Zoology

This 2020 photo provided by the Wyoming Game and Fish Department shows the worn, mostly toothless jaw of Grizzly 168. The grizzly was the oldest documented in the Yellowstone region. Bear biologists euthanized the 34-year-old grizzly due to its poor health. (Zach Turnbull/Wyoming Game and Fish Department)
January 24, 2021 - 1:42 pm
JACKSON, Wyo. (AP) — A 34-year-old grizzly bear captured in southwestern Wyoming has been confirmed as the oldest on record in the Yellowstone region, Wyoming wildlife officials said. Grizzly bear 168 was captured last summer after it preyed on calves in the Upper Green River Basin area. The male...
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FILE - In this Aug. 28, 2019 file photo, a Monarch butterfly flies to Joe Pye weed, in Freeport, Maine. Monarch butterflies are among well known species that best illustrate insect problems and declines, according to University of Connecticut entomologist David Wagner, lead author in a special package of studies released Monday, Jan. 11, 2021, written by 56 scientists from around the globe. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
January 11, 2021 - 7:33 pm
The world’s vital insect kingdom is undergoing “death by a thousand cuts,” the world’s top bug experts said. Climate change, insecticides, herbicides, light pollution, invasive species and changes in agriculture and land use are causing Earth to lose probably 1% to 2% of its insects each year, said...
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FILE - In this June 2, 2019, file photo, a fresh monarch butterfly rests on a Swedish Ivy plant soon after emerging in Washington. Trump administration officials are expected to say this week whether the monarch butterfly, a colorful and familiar backyard visitor now caught in a global extinction crisis, should receive federal designation as a threatened species. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
December 15, 2020 - 3:19 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Federal officials on Tuesday declared the monarch butterfly “a candidate” for threatened or endangered status, but said no action would be taken for several years because of the many other species awaiting that designation. Environmentalists said delaying that long could...
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This 2018 photo provided by the Leibniz-IZW Cheetah Research Project shows cheetahs gathering at a tree in central Namibia. New research published on Monday, Dec. 7, 2020, on how cheetahs use the landscape has allowed some ranchers to reduce the number of calves killed annually by 86%, largely by avoiding popular cheetah hangouts. (Leibniz-IZW Cheetah Research Project via AP)
December 07, 2020 - 3:07 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — On the dusty savannahs of Namibia, one of the last strongholds of cheetah populations on earth, conflicts between cattle ranchers and big cats threaten the survival of the embattled carnivores. But new research on how cheetahs use the landscape has allowed some ranchers to reduce...
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In this Saturday, Nov. 28, 2020, photo provided by Kelsea Dockham, rocks mark the location where a metal monolith once stood in the ground in a remote area of red rock in Spanish Valley, Utah south of Moab near Canyonlands National Park. The mysterious silver monolith that was placed there has disappeared less than 10 days after it was spotted by wildlife biologists performing a helicopter survey of bighorn sheep, federal officials and witnesses said. (Kelsea Dockham/Canyon State Overland via AP)
November 29, 2020 - 7:18 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A mysterious silver monolith that was placed in the Utah desert has disappeared less than 10 days after it was spotted by wildlife biologists performing a helicopter survey of bighorn sheep, federal officials and witnesses said. “We have received credible reports that the...
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In this photo provided by the Wyoming Migration Initiative, migratory elk cross Granite Creek in the Bridger-Teton National Forest, Wyoming, on May 19, 2018. Big-game animals have traveled the same routes across Western landscapes for millennia but scientists only recently have discovered precisely where they go in pursuit of the best places to spend summer or wait out winter. Now the U.S. Geological Survey has published a collection of migration maps based on the latest research using GPS tracking and statistical analysis techniques. (Gregory Nickerson/Wyoming Migration Initiative, University of Wyoming via AP)
November 26, 2020 - 11:36 am
CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — The life-or-death journey made by mule deer during the second-longest big game migration in North America came down to their ability to squeeze through a fence — a discovery made by scientists using wildlife GPS tracking techniques to map animal migrations in the West in...
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FILE - In this Oct. 24, 2020, file photo, a Washington state Department of Agriculture worker holds two of the dozens of Asian giant hornets vacuumed from a tree in Blaine, Wash. When scientists destroyed the first nest of so-called murder hornets found in the U.S. recently, they discovered about 500 live specimens inside in various stages of development. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
November 10, 2020 - 6:11 pm
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — When scientists in Washington state destroyed the first nest of so-called murder hornets found in the U.S., they discovered about 500 live specimens in various stages of development, officials said Tuesday. Among them were nearly 200 queens that had the potential to start...
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FILE - In this Sept. 2, 2019, file photo, a silverback mountain gorilla named Segasira walks in the Volcanoes National Park, Rwanda. These large vegetarian apes are generally peaceful, but as the number of family groups in a region increases, so does the frequency of gorilla family feuds, according to a new study published Wednesday, Nov. 4, 2020, in the journal Science Advances. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
November 04, 2020 - 2:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Gorillas are highly sociable animals – up to a point. A crowded mountain can make silverbacks more violent, scientists say. Mountain gorillas spend most of their time sleeping, chomping leaves and wild celery stalks, and grooming each other’s fur with long, dexterous fingers...
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Sven Spichiger, Washington State Department of Agriculture managing entomologist, walks with a canister of Asian giant hornets vacuumed from a nest in a tree behind him Saturday, Oct. 24, 2020, in Blaine, Wash. Scientists in Washington state discovered the first nest earlier in the week of so-called murder hornets in the United States and worked to wipe it out Saturday morning to protect native honeybees. Workers with the state Agriculture Department spent weeks searching, trapping and using dental floss to tie tracking devices to Asian giant hornets, which can deliver painful stings to people and spit venom but are the biggest threat to honeybees that farmers depend on to pollinate crops. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
October 27, 2020 - 1:56 am
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Workers from the state Department of Agriculture managed to destroy the first nest of so-called murder hornets discovered in the U.S. without suffering any stings or other injuries, the agency said Monday. The nest, located in Whatcom County near the Canadian border, created...
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In photo provided by the Washington State Dept. of Agriculture, an Asian Giant Hornet wearing a tracking device is shown Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020 near Blaine, Wash. Scientists have discovered the first nest of so-called murder hornets in the United States and plan to wipe it out Saturday to protect native honeybees, officials in Washington state said Friday, Oct. 23, 2020. (Karla Salp/Washington Dept. of Agriculture via AP)
October 23, 2020 - 7:08 pm
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Scientists in Washington state have discovered the first nest of so-called murder hornets in the United States and plan to wipe it out Saturday to protect native honeybees, officials said. Workers with the state Agriculture Department spent weeks searching, trapping and using...
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