Weapons administration

FILE - In this April 17, 2017, file photo, two North Korean soldiers look at the south side as a South Korean soldier, center, stands guard while U.S. Vice President Mike Pence visited the border village of Panmunjom which has separated the two Koreas since the Korean War, South Korea. South Korea has offered on Monday, July 17, 2017 to talk with North Korea to ease animosities along their tense border and resume reunions of families separated by their war in the 1950s. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man, File)
July 17, 2017 - 6:23 am
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Less than two weeks after North Korea's first intercontinental ballistic missile test, South Korea's new president has offered to hold talks at the tense border separating the two Koreas in what would be the rivals' first face-to-face meeting in 19 months. President Moon...
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FILE - In this June 6, 2015, file photo, heavy machines move imported iron ore at the dock in Rizhao in eastern China's Shandong province. China defended Thursday, July 13, 2017, its purchase of iron ore from North Korea following criticism by U.S. President Donald Trump and said it is "strictly and earnestly" complying with U.N. sanctions. China stopped importing North Korean coal but total trade has risen, which prompted Trump to complain last week Beijing is failing to use its economic leverage to stop Pyongyang's pursuit of nuclear weapons. (Chinatopix via AP)
July 13, 2017 - 6:54 am
BEIJING (AP) — China defended Thursday its purchase of iron ore from North Korea following criticism by U.S. President Donald Trump and said it is "strictly and earnestly" complying with U.N. sanctions. China stopped importing North Korean coal but total trade has risen, which prompted Trump to...
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FILE - In this Saturday, April 15, 2017, file photo, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waves during a military parade to celebrate the 105th birth anniversary of Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea. When Kim Jong Un took the helm of North Korea in late 2011, speculation swirled around the young leader. What would he do for an economically backward authoritarian nation in a high-stakes nuclear standoff with its neighbors and Washington? Almost six years later, his rule has actually seen the economy improve, and when it comes to the nuclear drive, it's obvious that Kim Jong Un, who rattled nerves last week by test-firing his country's first intercontinental ballistic missile, has a more uncompromising stance than his late father, Kim Jong Il. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)
July 13, 2017 - 5:41 am
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Ruthless dictator? Economic reformer? Shrewd master of nuclear brinksmanship? When Kim Jong Un took the helm of North Korea in late 2011, speculation swirled around the young, Swiss-educated leader. What would he do for an economically backward authoritarian nation that...
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FILE - In this Saturday, April 15, 2017, file photo, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un waves during a military parade to celebrate the 105th birth anniversary of Kim Il Sung in Pyongyang, North Korea. When Kim Jong Un took the helm of North Korea in late 2011, speculation swirled around the young leader. What would he do for an economically backward authoritarian nation in a high-stakes nuclear standoff with its neighbors and Washington? Almost six years later, his rule has actually seen the economy improve, and when it comes to the nuclear drive, it's obvious that Kim Jong Un, who rattled nerves last week by test-firing his country's first intercontinental ballistic missile, has a more uncompromising stance than his late father, Kim Jong Il. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)
July 13, 2017 - 5:39 am
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Ruthless dictator? Economic reformer? Shrewd master of nuclear brinksmanship? When Kim Jong Un took the helm of North Korea in late 2011, speculation swirled around the young, Swiss-educated leader. What would he do for an economically backward authoritarian nation that...
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In this image made from video, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Geng Shuang speaks during a press briefing in Beijing Tuesday, July 11, 2017. China said it shouldn’t be held responsible alone for resolving the North Korean nuclear standoff and accused other countries of shirking their responsibilities in the effort to reduce tensions. Geng told reporters China was upholding its obligations under United Nations resolutions, while other countries were fanning the crisis while damaging China’s interests by their actions. (AP Photo)
July 11, 2017 - 8:29 am
BEIJING (AP) — China on Tuesday said it shouldn't be held responsible alone for solving the North Korean nuclear standoff, and accused other countries of shirking their responsibilities in the effort to reduce tensions. The complaints, made in unusually strident language, follow a phone...
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A man walks by a TV screen showing a local news program reporting about North Korea's missile firing at Seoul Train Station in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, July 5, 2017. North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un vowed his nation would "demonstrate its mettle to the U.S." and never put its weapons programs up for negotiations a day after test-launching its first intercontinental ballistic missile. The hard line suggests more tests are being prepared as the country tries to perfect a nuclear missile capable of striking anywhere in the United States. The letters read "North Korea, release an ICBM launching video." (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)
July 07, 2017 - 11:11 am
UNITED NATIONS (AP) — More than 120 countries have approved the first-ever treaty banning nuclear weapons at a U.N. meeting boycotted by all nuclear-armed nations. Friday's vote was 122 countries in favor with the Netherlands opposed and Singapore abstaining. Elayne Whyte Gomez is president of the...
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People gather in Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea, Thursday, July 6, 2017, to celebrate the test launch of North Korea's first intercontinental ballistic missile two days earlier. The North's ICBM launch, its most successful missile test to date, has stoked security worries in Washington, Seoul and Tokyo as it showed the country could eventually perfect a reliable nuclear missile capable of reaching anywhere in the United States. Analysts say the "Hwasong 14" missile, tested Tuesday could reach Alaska if launched at a normal trajectory. (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin)
July 07, 2017 - 4:43 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The risk of an all-out war with North Korea is one reason a military strike isn't likely at the top of the possible responses to the North's latest missile test. U.S. officials worry that retaliation by the North could lead to untold numbers of deaths in South Korea. Still,...
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South Korea's President Moon Jae-in and his wife Kim Jung-sook wave as they arrive for the G-20 summit in Hamburg, northern Germany, Thursday, July 6, 2017. The leaders of the group of 20 meet July 7 and 8. (Carsten Rehder/dpa via AP)
July 06, 2017 - 10:39 pm
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The latest on the response to North Korea's missile launch (all times local): 11 a.m. South Korea's new liberal president says he's willing to meet North Korean leader Kim Jong Un amid heightened regional animosities in the wake of the North's first intercontinental...
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People gather in Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea, Thursday, July 6, 2017, to celebrate the test launch of North Korea's first intercontinental ballistic missile two days earlier. The North's ICBM launch, its most successful missile test to date, has stoked security worries in Washington, Seoul and Tokyo as it showed the country could eventually perfect a reliable nuclear missile capable of reaching anywhere in the United States. Analysts say the "Hwasong 14" missile, tested Tuesday could reach Alaska if launched at a normal trajectory. (AP Photo/Jon Chol Jin)
July 06, 2017 - 6:18 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A pre-emptive military strike may be among the "pretty severe things" President Donald Trump says he is considering for North Korea, but it's a step so fraught with risk that it ranks as among the unlikeliest options. Even a so-called surgical strike aimed at the North's partially...
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In this July 5, 2017, photo United States U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley, respond to Russia's statements, during United Nations Security Council meeting on North Korea's latest launch of an intercontinental ballistic missile, at U.N. headquarters.Having lost patience with China, the Trump administration is studying new steps to starve North Korea of cash for its nuclear program, including an option that would infuriate Beijing: sanctions on Chinese companies that help keep the North’s economy afloat. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
July 06, 2017 - 6:24 am
BEIJING (AP) — President Donald Trump's hopes for China's help with restraining North Korea appear to have gone nowhere, with the sides growing further apart as their approaches and concerns diverge. China shows no sign of caving to U.S. pressure to tighten the screws on Pyongyang, while the North'...
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