Water pollution

FILE - In this Dec. 3, 2018, file photo, trees reflect in a swimming pool outside Erica Hail's Paradise, Calif., home, which burned during the Camp Fire. Water officials say the drinking water in Paradise, which was decimated by a wildfire last year, is contaminated with the cancer-causing chemical benzene. Fixing the problem could cost $300 million and take up to two years. The Sacramento Bee reports Thursday, April 18, 2019, experts believe the extreme heat of the November firestorm created a "toxic cocktail" of gases in burning homes that was sucked into water pipes when the system depressurized. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)
April 18, 2019 - 3:10 pm
PARADISE, Calif. (AP) — The drinking water in Paradise, California, where 85 people died in the worst wildfire in state history, is contaminated with the cancer-causing chemical benzene, water officials said. Officials said they believe the contamination happened after the November firestorm...
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April 04, 2019 - 11:51 am
MILAN (AP) — Italian explorer Alex Bellini plans to travel down the world's 10 most polluted rivers on make-shift rafts, tracing the routes of plastics that pollute the world's oceans. Bellini said Thursday that he was inspired by a 2018 study by a German scientist that found 80% of plastic in the...
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In this photo taken Thursday, March 28, 2019, Anne Vierra,with the town of Paradise, takes payment for the first building permit since the Camp Fire as Jason and Meagann Buzzard plan to rebuild their home in Paradise, Calif. Small signs of rebuilding a Northern California town destroyed by wildfire are sprouting this spring, including the issuing of the first permit to rebuild one of the 11,000 homes destroyed in Paradise five months ago. A city hall clerk on Thursday issued the couple a building permit to replace their home destroyed by the Nov. 8 fire that killed 85 people. The couple told reporters they never thought about leaving. Paradise Mayor Jody Jones said the Buzzards' permit is a sign that the town will rebuild.(Hector Amezcua/The Sacramento Bee via AP)
March 29, 2019 - 3:42 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Small signs of rebuilding the California town of Paradise after it was destroyed by wildfire are sprouting this spring, including the issuing of the first permits to rebuild two the 11,000 homes destroyed five months ago. The city issued the first permit Thursday to Jason and...
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Community members assist a doctor carrying boxes with medical supplies as he runs towards the South African Defence Forces helicopter after assisting a community affected by a cyclone near Beira, Mozambique, Thursday, March 28, 2019. The first cases of cholera have been confirmed in the cyclone-ravaged city of Beira, Mozambican authorities announced on Wednesday, raising the stakes in an already desperate fight to help hundreds of thousands of people sheltering in increasingly squalid conditions. (AP Photo/Themba Hadebe)
March 29, 2019 - 1:38 pm
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Cholera cases in Mozambique among survivors of a devastating cyclone have shot up to 139, officials said, as nearly 1 million vaccine doses were rushed to the region and health workers desperately tried to improvise treatment space for victims. Cholera causes acute diarrhea, is...
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FILE - This Sept. 21, 2017, file photo shows the Environmental Protection Agency building in Washington. Flooding in the Midwest temporarily cut off a Superfund site in Nebraska that stores radioactive waste and explosives, inundated another one storing toxic chemical waste in Missouri, and limited access to others, the EPA said Wednesday, March 27, 2019. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
March 27, 2019 - 9:55 pm
MEAD, Neb. (AP) — Flooding in the Midwest temporarily cut off a Superfund site in Nebraska that stores radioactive waste and explosives, inundated another one storing toxic chemical waste in Missouri, and limited access to others, federal regulators said Wednesday. The Environmental Protection...
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March 25, 2019 - 3:02 pm
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — In a story March 23 about the aftermath of a Brazilian dam collapse, The Associated Press reported erroneously that a new evacuation had been ordered for people near a dam. They had been evacuated in February. A corrected version of the story is below: Brazilian miner Vale...
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In this March 12, 2019 satellite photo provided by NOAA, shows the Great Lakes in various degrees of snow and ice. A scientific report says the Great Lakes region is warming faster than the rest of the U.S., which likely will bring more flooding and other extreme weather events such as heat waves and drought. The warming climate also could mean less overall snowfall even as lake-effect snowstorms get bigger. The report by researchers from universities primarily from the Midwest says agriculture could be hit especially hard, with later spring planting and summer dry spells. (NOAA via AP)
March 21, 2019 - 5:46 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The Great Lakes region is warming faster than the rest of the U.S., a trend likely to bring more extreme storms while also degrading water quality, worsening erosion and posing tougher challenges for farming, scientists reported Thursday. The annual mean air temperature...
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FILE - In this June 25, 1952 file photo, a fire tug fights flames on the Cuyahoga River near downtown Cleveland. Federal environmental regulators say fish living in the northeastern Ohio river are now safe to eat. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga River was lauded by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine as progress achieved by investing in water quality.(The Plain Dealer via AP)
March 19, 2019 - 1:59 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Fish in the Cuyahoga River, which became synonymous with pollution when it caught fire in Cleveland in 1969, are now safe to eat, federal environmental regulators say. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga was lauded Monday by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine...
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An island of solar panels floats in a pond at the Los Bronces mining plant, about 65 kilometers (approximately 40 miles) from Santiago, Chile, Thursday, March 14, 2019. The island of solar panels could give purpose to mine refuse in Chile by using them to generate clean energy and reduce water evaporation.(AP Photo / Esteban Felix)
March 16, 2019 - 2:17 pm
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — In a story March 15 about a floating island of solar panels in Chile, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the array is 1,200 square feet. The array is 1,200 square meters. A corrected version of the story is below: SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — A floating island of solar...
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March 15, 2019 - 6:13 pm
MERRIMACK, N.H. (AP) — Democratic presidential hopeful Kirsten Gillibrand is trying to connect with voters' important issues on the ground — or, in some cases, underground. The U.S. senator from New York held two roundtable discussions Friday in New Hampshire communities struggling with...
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