Violations of environmental law

FILE - This Jan. 12, 2017, file photo shows gas gathering plant on a hilltop at the Southern California Gas Company's Aliso Canyon storage facility near the Porter Ranch neighborhood of Los Angeles. An investigation into the cause of the largest-known release of methane in the U.S. faults a California utility for the way it maintained its natural gas storage field before the massive 2015 blowout. The report released Friday, May 17, 2019, by the California Public Utilities Commission says Southern California Gas Co. did not assess its wells for disaster potential and did not investigate previous ruptures. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
May 17, 2019 - 8:58 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A blowout at a Los Angeles natural gas well in 2015 that led to the largest-known release of methane in U.S. history was the result of a corroded pipe casing, safety failures by a utility and inadequate regulations, according to an investigation report released Friday. Southern...
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President Donald Trump visits a new section of the border wall with Mexico in Calexico, Calif., Friday April 5, 2019. Gloria Chavez with the U.S. Border Patrol, center, and Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen listen (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
April 05, 2019 - 11:00 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on President Donald Trump and the border (all times local): 10:50 p.m. President Donald Trump is still thinking about winning heavily Democratic California in 2020. Trump lost the state to Hillary Clinton by over 4 million votes in the 2016 election. But he told a crowd...
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FILE - This summer 2018 file photo provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows the U.S. Coast Guard Icebreaker Healy on a research cruise in the Chukchi Sea of the Arctic Ocean. President Donald Trump's plan to reverse environmental initiatives in Alaska put in place by his predecessor, Barack Obama, took a hit with two rulings in federal court. U.S. District Court Judge Sharon Gleason on Friday, March 29, 2019 ruled that ruled that Trump exceeded his authority when he reversed bans on offshore drilling in vast parts of the Arctic Ocean and dozens of canyons in the Atlantic Ocean. She also ruled that the administration violated federal law with a proposed road that would split a wilderness area in a national wildlife refuge. (Devin Powell/NOAA via AP, File)
April 01, 2019 - 9:04 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — President Donald Trump's plan to reverse environmental initiatives in Alaska put in place by his predecessor, Barack Obama, took a hit with two rulings in federal court. U.S. District Court Judge Sharon Gleason on Friday ruled that the administration violated federal law...
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FILE - In this April 4, 2013, file photo, a mechanized shovel loads a haul truck with coal at the Spring Creek coal mine near Decker, Mont. A judge says U.S. officials should reconsider the climate change effects of expanding the mine. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)
February 12, 2019 - 7:50 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. officials have again been faulted by a federal judge for failing to adequately consider the potential climate change effects of expanding a massive coal mine in the sagebrush-covered hills of southeastern Montana. U.S. Magistrate Judge Timothy Cavan recommended in a...
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FILE - In this Nov. 18, 2018, file photo, a sign marks a trailhead at the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge in Broomfield, Colo., outside Denver. Activists are asking a judge to unseal documents from a 27-year-old criminal investigation into the former Rocky Flats nuclear weapons plant outside Denver. The groups said Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019 the documents could show whether the federal government did enough to clean up the site before turning part of it into a wildlife refuge and opening it to the public. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski,File)
January 10, 2019 - 5:37 pm
DENVER (AP) — Activists asked a U.S. judge Thursday to make documents public from a 27-year-old criminal investigation into a former nuclear weapons plant outside Denver with a history of fires, leaks and spills. The activists said the documents could show whether the federal government did enough...
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FILE - In this May 6, 2014, file photo, a vehicle moves past a sign outside Fiat Chrysler Automobiles world headquarters in Auburn Hills, Mich. Fiat Chrysler will pay more than $650 million to settle allegations that it cheated on emissions tests involving more than 104,000 Jeep SUVs and Ram pickup trucks, a person with the knowledge of the settlement told The Associated Press on Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)
January 10, 2019 - 1:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Fiat Chrysler agreed on Thursday to pay hundreds of millions of dollars, including a $300 million fine to the U.S. government, to settle allegations that the Italian-American automaker cheated on emissions tests. Under a deal with the Justice Department and the Environmental...
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FILE - In this May 6, 2014, file photo, a vehicle moves past a sign outside Fiat Chrysler Automobiles world headquarters in Auburn Hills, Mich. Fiat Chrysler will pay more than $650 million to settle allegations that it cheated on emissions tests involving more than 104,000 Jeep SUVs and Ram pickup trucks, a person with the knowledge of the settlement told The Associated Press on Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)
January 09, 2019 - 8:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Fiat Chrysler will pay more than $650 million to settle allegations that it cheated on emissions tests involving more than 104,000 Jeep SUVs and Ram pickup trucks, a person with the knowledge of the settlement told The Associated Press on Wednesday. The Italian-American automaker...
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File - In this Nov. 18, 2018 file photo, volunteer members of an El Dorado County search and rescue team search the ruins of a home, looking for human remains, in Paradise, Calif., following a wildfire. Authorities have deployed a powerful tool to aid in their race to identify the remains of 77 bodies burned in the deadly wildfire that ripped through Northern California: Rapid DNA testing that produces results in just two hours. But the technology that can match DNA to bone fragments in as little as two hours is only as effective as the numbers of people who show up to give a sample, and so far there are not nearly enough volunteers. (AP Photo/Sudhin Thanawala, File)
November 20, 2018 - 3:52 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The Latest on California's wildfires (all times local): 12:40 p.m. Authorities are using a rapid DNA test that produces results in just two hours to help identify the scores of people killed by the Northern California wildfire. The company ANDE is donating the technology...
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FILE - This July 19, 2018, file photo, shows the property, southwest of Belfield, N.D, the future home of The Davis Refinery near Theodore Roosevelt National Park. North Dakota water officials say the company developing the oil refinery has supplied adequate information to justify drawing water from an underwater aquifer. An attorney for area landowners challenging the recommended permit for the Davis Refinery counters that information from Meridian Energy Group has been vague and contradictory. The arguments came Wednesday, Nov. 14 during a hearing before an administrative law judge. (Tom Stromme /The Bismarck Tribune via AP, File)
November 14, 2018 - 4:09 pm
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — A company developing an oil refinery near Theodore Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota has supplied adequate information to justify drawing water from an underwater aquifer, State Water Commission officials testified Wednesday. An attorney for area landowners challenging...
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This photo provided by the United States Geological Survey shows a female Pacific walrus resting, Sept. 19, 2013 in Point Lay, Alaska. A lawsuit making its way through federal court in Alaska will decide whether Pacific walruses should be listed as a threatened species, giving them additional protections. Walruses use sea ice for giving birth, nursing and resting between dives for food but the amount of ice over several decades has steadily declined due to climate warming. (Ryan Kingsbery/U.S. Geological Survey via AP)
October 13, 2018 - 2:39 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Given a choice between giving birth on land or sea ice, Pacific walrus mothers most often choose ice. Likewise, they prefer sea ice for molting, mating, nursing and resting between dives for food. Trouble is, as the century progresses, there's going to be far less ice...
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