Subpoenas

FILE - In this June 8, 2017 file photo, James Wolfe, center, former director of security with the Senate Intelligence Committee, escorts former FBI director James Comey to a secure room to continue his testimony on the 2016 election and his firing by President Donald Trump, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Federal prosecutors are accusing Wolfe with lying to the FBI about contact he had with reporters who covered the committee. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, file)
June 08, 2018 - 4:30 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A former employee of the Senate intelligence committee appeared before a federal court in Maryland Friday after being arrested for lying to the FBI about contacts with multiple reporters. James A. Wolfe, the longtime director of security for the committee — one of multiple...
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FILE - In this May 9, 2018, file photo, CIA nominee Gina Haspel, center seated, testifies during a confirmation hearing of the Senate Intelligence Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. A former employee of the committee has been arrested on charges of lying to the FBI about contacts he had with multiple reporters, federal prosecutors said Thursday, June 7, 2018. James A. Wolfe, the longtime director of security for the committee — one of multiple congressional panels investigating potential ties between Russia and the Trump campaign — was indicted on three false statement counts after prosecutors say he misled agents about his relationships with reporters. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
June 08, 2018 - 3:14 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A former employee of the Senate intelligence committee has been arrested on charges of lying to the FBI about contacts he had with multiple reporters, federal prosecutors said Thursday. James A. Wolfe, the longtime director of security for the committee — one of multiple...
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In this June 1, 2018 photo, President Donald Trump attends a Change of Command ceremony at the U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters in Washington. Trump asserted his presidential power and escalated his efforts to discredit the special counsel Russia probe Monday, declaring he has the “absolute right” to pardon himself and attacking the investigation as “totally UNCONSTITUTIONAL!” (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
June 04, 2018 - 9:55 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump asserted his presidential power and escalated his efforts to discredit the special counsel Russia probe Monday, declaring he has the "absolute right" to pardon himself and attacking the investigation as "totally UNCONSTITUTIONAL!" Trump's comments on Twitter...
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FILE- In this May 5, 2018, file photo, Rudy Giuliani, an attorney for President Donald Trump, speaks at the Iran Freedom Convention for Human Rights and democracy in Washington. Sharpening their legal and political defenses against the special counsel’s Russia probe, President Donald Trump’s attorneys stressed Sunday, June 3, that they would contest any effort to force the president to testify in front of a grand jury but downplayed the idea that Trump could pardon himself. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
June 03, 2018 - 9:10 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on President Donald Trump and special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation (all times local): 8:55 a.m. President Donald Trump's attorney says his legal team would go to court to prevent any effort to subpoena the president. Rudy Giuliani appeared on ABC's "...
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FILE- In this May 5, 2018, file photo, Rudy Giuliani, an attorney for President Donald Trump, speaks at the Iran Freedom Convention for Human Rights and democracy in Washington. Sharpening their legal and political defenses against the special counsel’s Russia probe, President Donald Trump’s attorneys stressed Sunday, June 3, that they would contest any effort to force the president to testify in front of a grand jury but downplayed the idea that Trump could pardon himself. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
June 03, 2018 - 11:03 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — An attorney for President Donald Trump stressed Sunday that the president's legal team would contest any effort to force the president to testify in front of a grand jury during the special counsel's Russia probe but downplayed the idea that Trump could pardon himself. Rudy...
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President Donald Trump, center, accompanied by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, left, speaks to members of the media on the South Lawn outside the Oval Office in Washington, Friday, June 1, 2018, after meeting with former North Korean military intelligence chief Kim Yong Chol. After the meeting Trump announced that the Summit with North Korea will go forward. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
June 02, 2018 - 4:57 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's lawyers composed a secret 20-page letter to special counsel Robert Mueller to assert that he cannot be forced to testify while arguing that he could not have committed obstruction because he has absolute authority over all federal investigations. The...
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Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens leaves the podium after announcing his resignation at a news conference, Tuesday, May 29, 2018, at the state Capitol, in Jefferson City, Mo. Greitens resigned amid a widening investigation that arose from an affair with his former hairdresser. Greitens said his resignation would take effect Friday. (Julie Smith/The Jefferson City News-Tribune via AP)
May 29, 2018 - 6:52 pm
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — The Latest on allegations against Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens (all times local): 5:50 p.m. U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt says Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens' resignation was "the best decision for his family and the state." The Republican senator also said Tuesday that he looks...
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Scott Faughn, publisher of the Jefferson City-based Missouri Times, defends himself Wednesday, May 23, 2018, against legislative questions about his payments to an attorney for a man whose ex-wife had an affair with Gov. Eric Greitens. (Zara McDowell/ABC 17 News via AP)
May 24, 2018 - 9:17 pm
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Allegations of sexual misconduct and campaign finance violations against Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens have been shared with federal authorities by a private attorney and a key lawmaker, according to testimony Thursday during a legislative hearing. The hearing by a special...
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In this April 6, 2018 photo, students walk on the campus of Mount Ida College in Newton, Mass. The state attorney general's office said Tuesday, May 15, 2018, that the sale of the college to the University of Massachusetts-Amherst can proceed because UMass paid fair market value for the smaller school, and the only alternative was the bankruptcy and closure of Mount Ida. (Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe via AP)
May 16, 2018 - 5:58 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Top officials of a Massachusetts college that recently closed its doors declined to appear before lawmakers at an oversight hearing on Wednesday, prompting the head of the panel to warn it might issue subpoenas. Mount Ida College, a small, private school in suburban Boston that traces...
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Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens leaves the Civil Courts building after speaking with reporters on the steps of the Civil Court building on Monday, May 14, 2018, after the case against him was dismissed. Greitens declared victory Monday as prosecutors abruptly dropped a felony invasion-of-privacy charge alleging he had taken a revealing photo of a woman with whom he has acknowledged having an affair. (Robert Cohen/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)
May 15, 2018 - 1:36 pm
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens no longer faces a felony charge stemming from an extramarital affair, but a legislative panel signaled Tuesday that it's pushing forward with its own expanded investigation into a variety of allegations against the Republican governor. The...
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