Student finances

Anthony Spencer, whose wife, Chastity, right, is a furloughed federal worker, holds his daughter, Sydney, as they wait in line with others who are affected by the partial government shutdown for Philabundance volunteers to distribute food under Interstate 95 in Philadelphia, Wednesday, Jan. 23, 2019. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
January 24, 2019 - 1:02 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — At this time of year, John Sprinkle and his wife would normally be planning their summer vacation. Not now. Sprinkle, a furloughed federal employee, is about to miss his second paycheck since the partial government shutdown began just before Christmas. With no end in sight to the...
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FILE - This April 2017 file photo provided by NerdWallet shows Liz Weston, a columnist for personal finance website NerdWallet.com. (NerdWallet via AP, File)
January 23, 2019 - 8:39 am
Tyler Luker of Plano, Texas, is a high school junior who already knows which college he wants to attend (University of Missouri), how much it costs ($43,300 for out-of-state residents) and how much he can expect his single mother to contribute: nothing. "That's protecting my retirement," says...
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Sen. Lamar Alexander listens as Department of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos speaks to students at Sevier County High School, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018, in Sevierville, Tenn. The pair spoke about the newly launched myStudentAid mobile application. (Robert Berlin/The Daily Times via AP)
November 27, 2018 - 2:37 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said Tuesday that ballooning student debt has caused a "crisis in higher education," and that the traditional path to college might not be the best choice for all students. DeVos made the comments in Atlanta at a training conference for the...
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FILE - In this Thursday, April 19, 2018, file photo, former New York City Mayor and United Nations Special Envoy for Climate Action Michael Bloomberg speaks at World Bank/IMF Spring Meetings, in Washington. Bloomberg is donating $1.8 billion to his alma mater, Johns Hopkins University. Bloomberg and the Baltimore university said Sunday, Nov. 18, 2018, that the gift is the largest ever to any education institution in the U.S. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)
November 18, 2018 - 5:53 pm
BALTIMORE (AP) — Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced Sunday he's donating $1.8 billion to his alma mater, Johns Hopkins University, to boost financial aid for low- and middle-income students. The Baltimore university said the contribution — the largest ever to any education...
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In this October 2014 photo provided by Nerdwallet, Takiia Anderson, left, poses for a photo with her daughter Taje Perkins during a campus visit to Anderson’s alma mater, Howard University in Washington. Today, Anderson’s student debt is long gone. She has nearly $500,000 in retirement savings, and her daughter, Taje Perkins, finished her third year at Spelman College in Atlanta with no student loans to cover its nearly $30,000 per year in tuition and fees. (Nerdwallet via AP)
October 11, 2018 - 10:37 am
When Takiia Anderson graduated from Boston College Law School in 1999, she was a single mom with a 2-year-old child, nearly $100,000 in student loans and a new job as a government attorney that paid $34,102 a year. She didn't like that math. "People are talking about 20 years to pay off a student...
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FILE- In this Nov. 9, 2017, file photo people walk by Old Main on the Penn State University main campus in State College, Pa. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, becomes available Monday, Oct. 1, 2018. It’s widely considered the most important document in securing money for higher education as current and prospective students must fill it out annually to get federal student aid including loans, grants, work-study and certain scholarships. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)
October 01, 2018 - 4:17 pm
Let the race for financial aid begin. The Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, becomes available Monday. It's widely considered the most important document in securing money for higher education. Current and prospective students must fill it out annually to get loans, grants and...
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FILE - In this Sept. 7, 2017, file photo, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos speaks at George Mason University Arlington, Va., campus. Complaints and lawsuits lodged against for-profit colleges are unfolding as DeVos engineers a seismic shift in the regulatory landscape that stands to benefit the multibillion-dollar industry. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
August 24, 2018 - 5:50 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A lawsuit against Ashford University describes an admissions office with a cutthroat sales culture more akin to a used-car lot than a place of higher learning, peddling "false promises and faulty information" to lure students eligible for federal financial aid. Sound familiar? The...
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August 22, 2018 - 12:16 pm
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — The Walt Disney Co. is offering to pay full tuition for hourly workers who want to earn a college degree, finish a high school diploma or learn a new skill, the entertainment giant said Wednesday. As many as 80,000 hourly workers in the United States could be eligible for the...
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FILE - In this Sept. 7, 2017 file photo, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos speaks at George Mason University Arlington, Va., campus. The Trump administration is proposing new rules that could make it harder for students to get their loans erased in cases of fraud. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos announced the proposal Wednesday after months of negotiating to replace Obama-era rules. Her proposal would allow students to get loans erased if a school intentionally misleads them into taking out student loans. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
July 25, 2018 - 2:27 pm
Students who are defrauded by their schools would have a harder time getting their federal loans erased under new rules proposed by the Trump administration on Wednesday. The proposal, which aims to replace a set of Obama-era rules that were never implemented, drew applause from the for-profit...
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In this Tuesday, May 29, 2018 photo, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, center, answers questions from reports after filing to run for the Republican nomination for governor as running mate and Wichita businessman Wink Hartman, to his left, and family members watch, in Topeka, Kan. Kobach is attacking a state law that helps young people living in the U.S. illegally go to state colleges. (AP Photo/John Hanna)
May 31, 2018 - 7:53 pm
TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — A Republican candidate for Kansas governor who has advised President Donald Trump is attacking a state law that helps young people living in the U.S. illegally go to state colleges, appealing to his party's conservative base in a tough GOP primary race. Kansas Secretary of State...
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