Soft commodity markets

FILE - This April 28, 2020 file photo shows the Pilgrim's Pride plant in Cold Spring. Minn. Pilgrim’s Pride Corp. has reached a plea agreement with the U.S. government, Wednesday, Oct. 14, over charges of price-fixing in the chicken industry. If a federal judge approves the agreement, Pilgrim’s Pride would pay a fine of $110.5 million as a penalty for restraining competition. (Dave Schwarz/St. Cloud Times via AP)
October 14, 2020 - 11:38 am
Pilgrim’s Pride Corp. has reached a plea agreement with the U.S. government over charges of price-fixing in the chicken industry. Under the agreement, Pilgrim’s Pride would pay a fine of $110.5 million as a penalty for restraining competition in three separate contracts with a U.S. customer. In...
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The TIPCO tower stands in Bangkok, Thailand, Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020. One of Asia's biggest asphalt companies, Tipco Asphalt, is helping Venezuela skirt harsh U.S. sanctions by moving hundreds of millions of dollars on behalf of the state-run oil company PDVSA, according to an Associated Press investigation. (AP Photo/Gemunu Amarasinghe)
October 08, 2020 - 8:31 am
MIAMI (AP) — Back in January, a yearlong campaign of U.S. sanctions was taking its toll at Venezuela’s state-run oil company. Many of PDVSA’s overseas bank accounts had been frozen or closed, hampering its ability to pay vendors on whom it relies to keep the nation’s crude flowing. So, as the bills...
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FILE - In this July 11, 2018, file photo, a field of corn grows in front of an old windmill in Pacific Junction, Iowa. The federal government said Friday, Sept. 18, 2020, it would give farmers an additional $14 billion to compensate them for the difficulties they've experienced selling their crops, milk and meat because of the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File )
September 18, 2020 - 2:28 pm
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — The federal government said Friday that it will give farmers an additional $14 billion to compensate them for the difficulties they have experienced selling their crops, milk and meat because of the coronavirus pandemic. The U.S. Department of Agriculture released details of...
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In this Feb. 29, 2012, file photo a shopper looks over the wine at King & Godfree, one of Australia's oldest licensed grocery stores in, Melbourne, Australia. China on Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2020, began investigating whether Australia is dumping wine in a trade dispute that further strains relations between the countries and could shut the biggest export market for Australian wine. (AP Photo/Mal Fairclough, FILE)
August 18, 2020 - 5:11 am
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — China on Tuesday began investigating whether Australia is dumping wine in a trade dispute that further strains relations between the countries and could shut the biggest export market for Australian wine. The Chinese Ministry of Commerce said the anti-dumping...
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Workers with old Belarus national flags, one of them holds a poster reads "Requirement # 1 Go away!" gather during a rally at the Minsk Motor Plant in Minsk, Belarus, Monday, Aug. 17, 2020. Some thousands of factory workers have taken to the streets of Minsk demanding the resignation of Belarus' authoritarian President Alexander Lukashenko. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)
August 17, 2020 - 3:41 pm
MINSK, Belarus (AP) — Workers heckled and jeered President Alexander Lukashenko on Monday as he visited a factory and strikes grew across Belarus, raising the pressure on the authoritarian leader to step down after 26 years in power. On the ninth straight day of mass protests over the official...
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Children wash sheep with soap before they are offered for sale for the upcoming Islamic holiday of Eid al-Adha, on the beach in Dakar, Senegal Thursday, July 30, 2020. Even in the best of times, many Muslims in West Africa scramble to afford a sheep to slaughter on the Eid al-Adha holiday, a display of faith that often costs as much as a month's income, and now the coronavirus is wreaking havoc on people's budgets putting an important religious tradition beyond financial reach. (AP Photo/Sylvain Cherkaoui)
July 30, 2020 - 12:16 pm
DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — Even in the best of times, many Muslims in West Africa scramble to afford a sheep to slaughter on Eid al-Adha, a display of faith that often costs as much as a month's income. Now COVID-19 is wreaking havoc on people's budgets from Senegal to Nigeria to Ivory Coast, putting an...
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This artist rendering released by Live Nation shows the set up for Live Nation's “Live from the Drive-In,” concert series taking place July 10-12. (Live Nation via AP)
June 22, 2020 - 12:26 pm
The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Monday related to the national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus. ________________________ CASH BURN: Live to see another day has become a...
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South Korea's Unification Ministry's spokesman Yoh Sang-key, speaks during a briefing at the government complex in Seoul, South Korea, Wednesday, June 10, 2020. South Korea’s government on Wednesday said it will sue two activist groups that have sent anti-Pyongyang leaflets and plastic bottles filled with rice to the North for allegedly creating tensions between the rivals. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)
June 10, 2020 - 5:48 am
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea’s government said Wednesday that it will press charges against two activist groups that have been floating anti-Pyongyang leaflets and bottles filled with rice to North Korea. Any action against the groups is likely to trigger a debate over freedom of...
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May 05, 2020 - 5:38 pm
BELLE PLAINE, Kan. (AP) — The attorneys general for 11 Midwestern states urged the Justice Department on Tuesday to pursue a federal investigation into market concentration and potential price fixing by meatpackers in the cattle industry during the coronavirus pandemic. In a letter to U.S. Attorney...
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In this Friday, April 17, 2020, photo, Chris Petersen looks at a Berkshire hog in a pen on his farm near Clear Lake, Iowa. COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus, has created problems for all meat producers, but pork farmers have been hit especially hard. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
April 21, 2020 - 8:30 am
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — After enduring extended trade disputes and worker shortages, U.S. hog farmers were poised to finally hit it big this year with expectations of climbing prices amid soaring domestic and foreign demand. Instead, restaurant closures due to the coronavirus have contributed to an...
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