Seniors' health

The U.S. Medicare Handbook is photographed Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, in Washington. Seniors in many states will be able to get additional services like help with chores, safety devices and respite for caregivers next year through private ‘Medicare Advantage’ insurance plans. It’s a sign of potentially big changes for Medicare. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
November 09, 2018 - 12:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Medicare is experimenting with a new direction in health care. Starting next year, seniors in many states will be able to get additional services such as help with chores and respite for caregivers through private Medicare Advantage insurance plans. There's a growing recognition...
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November 09, 2018 - 9:32 am
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — Dutch officials said Friday they will prosecute a nursing home doctor for euthanizing an elderly woman with dementia, the first time a doctor has been charged since the Netherlands legalized euthanasia in 2002. Dutch prosecutors said in a statement the doctor "had not...
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FILE - In this Sept. 17, 2014 file photo, retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor speaks during a lecture, in Concord, N.H. O'Connor, the first woman on the Supreme Court, says she has the beginning stages of dementia and "probably Alzheimer's disease." O'Connor made the announcement in a letter Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. She said that her diagnosis was made "some time ago" and that as her condition has progressed she is "no longer able to participate in public life." (AP Photo/Jim Cole, File)
October 23, 2018 - 1:38 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Sandra Day O'Connor, the first woman on the Supreme Court, announced Tuesday in a frank and personal letter that she has been diagnosed with "the beginning stages of dementia, probably Alzheimer's disease." The 88-year-old said doctors diagnosed her some time ago and that as her...
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FILE - This Oct. 7, 2003 file photo shows a section of a human brain with Alzheimer's disease on display at the Museum of Neuroanatomy at the University at Buffalo, in Buffalo, N.Y. On Wednesday, July 25, 2018, two drug makers said an experimental therapy slowed mental decline by 30 percent in patients who got the highest dose in a mid-stage study, and it removed much of the sticky plaque gumming up their brains. The drug, called BAN2401, is from Eisai and Biogen. (AP Photo/David Duprey)
July 25, 2018 - 4:38 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Hopes are rising again for a drug to alter the course of Alzheimer's disease after repeated failures. Two drug companies said that an experimental therapy they are developing slowed mental decline by 30 percent in patients who got the highest dose. It also removed much of the sticky...
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In this March 23, 2017 photo provided by the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, patient Rick Karr is prepared for treatment at the facility in Toronto, Canada. Karr was the first Alzheimer's patient treated with focused ultrasound to open the blood-brain barrier. Scientists are using ultrasound waves to temporarily jiggle an opening in the brain’s protective shield, in hopes the technique one day might help drugs for Alzheimer’s, brain tumors and other diseases better reach their target. (Kevin Van Paassen/Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre via AP)
July 25, 2018 - 1:03 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A handful of Alzheimer's patients signed up for a bold experiment: They let scientists beam sound waves into the brain to temporarily jiggle an opening in its protective shield. That shield, called the blood-brain barrier, prevents germs and other damaging substances from leaching...
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Margaret Graham, 74, has her blood pressure checked while visiting the Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C., on Friday, July 13, 2018. She had participated in a multi-year study, published on Wednesday, July 25, 2018, investigating a connection between high blood pressure and the risk of mental decline. "I feel like maybe with this study, some findings may come that will develop new drugs and also new activities, exercise, theories that will help people to maintain an acceptable blood pressure level," Graham says. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed)
July 25, 2018 - 9:42 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Lowering blood pressure more than usually recommended not only helps prevent heart problems, it also cuts the risk of mental decline that often leads to Alzheimer's disease, a major study finds. It's the first time a single step has been clearly shown to help prevent a dreaded...
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Steam billows on New York's Fifth Avenue, Thursday, July 19, 2018. A steam pipe exploded beneath Fifth Avenue in Manhattan early Thursday, sending chunks of asphalt flying, a geyser of billowing white steam stories into the air and forcing pedestrians to take cover. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
July 19, 2018 - 9:03 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — An aging steam pipe containing cancer-causing asbestos exploded beneath Fifth Avenue in Manhattan early Thursday, spewing a geyser of white vapor 10 stories high and forcing an evacuation of 49 buildings, but city officials said there was no major public health threat. Five people,...
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July 11, 2018 - 7:30 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Pfizer, facing an aging population and shifting risks from the loss of patents, is reshaping the company into three businesses. The three divisions, announced Wednesday, include Innovative Medicines, which will focus on biological science and other technologies needed to address an...
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FILE - In this Aug. 8, 2009, file photo, actor-singer David Cassidy arrives at the ABC Disney Summer press tour party in Pasadena, Calif. Cassidy said he was still drinking in the last years of his life and he did not have dementia. People magazine reported Wednesday, June 6, 2018, the former teen idol called producers of an A&E documentary after he fell ill and told them he had liver disease. In the recorded conversation, Cassidy said there was no sign of dementia and it was “complete alcohol poisoning.”(AP Photo/Dan Steinberg, File)
June 06, 2018 - 9:17 am
LOS ANGELES (AP) — A new documentary quotes David Cassidy as saying he was still drinking in the last years of his life and he did not have dementia. People magazine reported Wednesday the former teen idol called producers of an A&E documentary after he fell ill and told them he had liver...
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President Donald Trump speaks during an event about prescription drug prices with Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, left, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Friday, May 11, 2018. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
May 12, 2018 - 6:20 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's long-promised plan to bring down drug prices would mostly spare the pharmaceutical industry he previously accused of "getting away with murder." Instead he focuses on private competition and more openness to reduce America's prescription pain. In Rose...
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