Seniors' health

FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Alabama Department of Corrections shows a police mug shot of Vernon Madison, who is scheduled to be executed for the 1985 murder of Mobile police officer Julius Schulte. The Supreme Court is ordering a new state court hearing to determine whether an Alabama death row inmate is so affected by dementia that he can't be executed. The justices ruled 5-3 on Wednesday, feb. 27, 2019 in favor of Madison. His lawyers say he has suffered strokes that have left him with severe dementia. (Alabama Department of Corrections, via AP, File)
February 27, 2019 - 4:02 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is ordering a new state court hearing to determine whether an Alabama death row inmate is so affected by dementia that he can't be executed. The justices ruled 5-3 on Wednesday in favor of inmate Vernon Madison, who killed a police officer in 1985. His lawyers...
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Japanese Finance Minister Taro Aso speaks during a budget committee meeting at the lower house of the parliament in Tokyo Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019. Aso reluctantly apologized for saying childless people are to blame for the country's rising social security costs and its aging and declining population. Aso said Tuesday that he apologized if some people found his remarks "unpleasant." (Yohei Kanasashi/Kyodo News via AP)
February 05, 2019 - 3:38 am
TOKYO (AP) — Japan's Finance Minister Taro Aso has reluctantly apologized for saying childless people are to blame for the country's rising social security costs and its aging and declining population. "If it made some people feel uncomfortable, I apologize," Aso said Tuesday after drawing...
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A person walks along the lakeshore, Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2019, in Chicago. A deadly arctic deep freeze enveloped the Midwest with record-breaking temperatures on Wednesday, triggering widespread closures of schools and businesses, and prompting the U.S. Postal Service to take the rare step of suspending mail delivery to a wide swath of the region. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato)
January 30, 2019 - 6:09 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — A blast of polar air enveloped much of the Midwest on Wednesday, closing schools and businesses and straining infrastructure across the Rust Belt with some of the lowest temperatures in a generation. The deep freeze snapped rail lines and canceled hundreds of flights in the nation's...
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Mary Radnofsky, diagnosed with a rare form of leukoencephalopathy and in the early stages of dementia, holds her service dog Benjy at her home, on Friday, Jan. 18, 2019, in Alexandria, Va. Faced with an aging American workforce, U.S. companies are increasingly navigating delicate conversations with employees suffering from cognitive declines or dementia diagnoses, experts say. (AP Photo/Kevin Wolf)
January 28, 2019 - 3:02 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Faced with an aging American workforce, companies are increasingly navigating delicate conversations with employees grappling with cognitive declines, experts say. Workers experiencing early stages of dementia may struggle with tasks they had completed without difficulty...
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The U.S. Medicare Handbook is photographed Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018, in Washington. Seniors in many states will be able to get additional services like help with chores, safety devices and respite for caregivers next year through private ‘Medicare Advantage’ insurance plans. It’s a sign of potentially big changes for Medicare. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
November 09, 2018 - 12:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Medicare is experimenting with a new direction in health care. Starting next year, seniors in many states will be able to get additional services such as help with chores and respite for caregivers through private Medicare Advantage insurance plans. There's a growing recognition...
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November 09, 2018 - 9:32 am
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — Dutch officials said Friday they will prosecute a nursing home doctor for euthanizing an elderly woman with dementia, the first time a doctor has been charged since the Netherlands legalized euthanasia in 2002. Dutch prosecutors said in a statement the doctor "had not...
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FILE - In this Sept. 17, 2014 file photo, retired U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor speaks during a lecture, in Concord, N.H. O'Connor, the first woman on the Supreme Court, says she has the beginning stages of dementia and "probably Alzheimer's disease." O'Connor made the announcement in a letter Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. She said that her diagnosis was made "some time ago" and that as her condition has progressed she is "no longer able to participate in public life." (AP Photo/Jim Cole, File)
October 23, 2018 - 1:38 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Sandra Day O'Connor, the first woman on the Supreme Court, announced Tuesday in a frank and personal letter that she has been diagnosed with "the beginning stages of dementia, probably Alzheimer's disease." The 88-year-old said doctors diagnosed her some time ago and that as her...
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FILE - This Oct. 7, 2003 file photo shows a section of a human brain with Alzheimer's disease on display at the Museum of Neuroanatomy at the University at Buffalo, in Buffalo, N.Y. On Wednesday, July 25, 2018, two drug makers said an experimental therapy slowed mental decline by 30 percent in patients who got the highest dose in a mid-stage study, and it removed much of the sticky plaque gumming up their brains. The drug, called BAN2401, is from Eisai and Biogen. (AP Photo/David Duprey)
July 25, 2018 - 4:38 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Hopes are rising again for a drug to alter the course of Alzheimer's disease after repeated failures. Two drug companies said that an experimental therapy they are developing slowed mental decline by 30 percent in patients who got the highest dose. It also removed much of the sticky...
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In this March 23, 2017 photo provided by the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, patient Rick Karr is prepared for treatment at the facility in Toronto, Canada. Karr was the first Alzheimer's patient treated with focused ultrasound to open the blood-brain barrier. Scientists are using ultrasound waves to temporarily jiggle an opening in the brain’s protective shield, in hopes the technique one day might help drugs for Alzheimer’s, brain tumors and other diseases better reach their target. (Kevin Van Paassen/Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre via AP)
July 25, 2018 - 1:03 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A handful of Alzheimer's patients signed up for a bold experiment: They let scientists beam sound waves into the brain to temporarily jiggle an opening in its protective shield. That shield, called the blood-brain barrier, prevents germs and other damaging substances from leaching...
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Margaret Graham, 74, has her blood pressure checked while visiting the Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, N.C., on Friday, July 13, 2018. She had participated in a multi-year study, published on Wednesday, July 25, 2018, investigating a connection between high blood pressure and the risk of mental decline. "I feel like maybe with this study, some findings may come that will develop new drugs and also new activities, exercise, theories that will help people to maintain an acceptable blood pressure level," Graham says. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed)
July 25, 2018 - 9:42 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Lowering blood pressure more than usually recommended not only helps prevent heart problems, it also cuts the risk of mental decline that often leads to Alzheimer's disease, a major study finds. It's the first time a single step has been clearly shown to help prevent a dreaded...
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