Salmon

FILE - In this June 22, 2015 photo, Melissa Erkel, a fish passage biologist with the Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife, looks at a culvert, a large pipe that allows streams to pass beneath roads but block migrating salmon, along the north fork of Newaukum Creek near Enumclaw, Wash. The Supreme Court is leaving in place a court order that forces Washington state to restore salmon habitat by removing barriers that block fish migration. The justices divided 4-4 Monday, June 11, 2018, in the long-running dispute that pits the state against Indian tribes and the federal government. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, file)
June 11, 2018 - 6:40 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Washington state must restore salmon habitat by removing barriers that block fish migration after the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday left in place a lower court order. The justices divided 4-4 in the long-running dispute that pits the state against Northwest Indian tribes and the...
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June 07, 2018 - 5:15 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — An Idaho utility has filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency contending the agency failed to act on a request by the state of Idaho to modify water temperature standards below a hydroelectric project where federally protect fall chinook salmon reproduce...
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FILE - In this July 13, 2007 file photo, workers with the Pebble Mine project test drill in the Bristol Bay region of Alaska near the village of Iliamma. A Canadian company that was courted as a potential partner in a proposed copper-and-gold mine near one of the world's largest salmon fisheries has backed away from the project. Mine developer Northern Dynasty Minerals Ltd. says it was unable to finalize an agreement with First Quantum Minerals Ltd., the potential investor. The proposed mine is near Alaska's Bristol Bay, which is where about half the world's sockeye salmon is produced. (AP Photo/Al Grillo, File)
May 25, 2018 - 7:51 pm
JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — A Canadian company that was courted as a potential partner in a proposed copper-and-gold mine near one of the world's largest salmon fisheries in Alaska has backed away from the project. Northern Dynasty Minerals Ltd., which is seeking to develop the Pebble Mine project in...
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In this March 14, 2018, photo, a California sea lion, designated #U253, leaps out of a cage towards the beach and open Pacific Ocean as Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife scientist Bryan Wright holds the gate open in Newport, Ore. After a decade killing the hungriest sea lions in one area, wildlife officials now want to do so at Willamette Falls, a waterfall in the Willamette River about 25 miles (40 kilometers) southeast of Portland. Five days after his 2 1/2-hour drive to the Oregon coast, #U253 was back at Willamette Falls, hungry for more fish. (AP Photo/Don Ryan)
March 22, 2018 - 3:43 pm
NEWPORT, Ore. (AP) — The 700-pound sea lion blinked in the sun, sniffed the sea air and then lazily shifted to the edge of the truck bed and plopped onto the beach below. Freed from the cage that carried him to the ocean, the massive marine mammal shuffled into the surf, looked left, looked right...
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FILE--In this Jan. 18, 2014, file photo, an endangered female orca leaps from the water while breaching in Puget Sound west of Seattle, Wash. Washington Gov. Jay Inslee is set to establish an executive order Wednesday, March 14, 2018, calling for state actions to protect the unique population of endangered orcas that spend time in Puget Sound. The fish-eating whales have struggled due to lack of food, pollution and noise and disturbances from vessels. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
March 14, 2018 - 9:18 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — With the number of endangered orcas that frequent the inland waters of Washington state at a 30-year low, Gov. Jay Inslee on Wednesday directed state agencies to take immediate and longer-term steps to protect the struggling killer whales. The fish-eating mammals that spend time in...
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In this photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, a winter-run Chinook salmon is seen on Friday, March 2, 2018. Approximately 29,000 endangered winter-run juvenile Chinook salmon were released into the North Fork of Battle Creek, a tributary of the Sacramento River. A $100 million project removing some dams and helping fish route around others is allowing wildlife officials to restore one of the state's most endangered native salmon to vital spring-fed Battle Creek, which springs from the cold northernmost reaches of the Sierra Nevada. Authorities say Battle Creek could prove a species-saving chill hideout against climate change and drought. (Steve Martarano/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)
March 08, 2018 - 6:55 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A $100 million project removing dams and helping fish route around others is returning a badly endangered salmon to spring-fed waters in northernmost California, giving cold-loving native fish a life-saving place to chill as scientists say climate change, drought and human...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2017, file photo, Riley Starks of Lummi Island Wild shows three of the farm-raised Atlantic salmon that were caught alongside four healthy Kings in Point Williams, Wash. The Washington Legislature on Friday, March 2, 2018, voted to phase out marine Atlantic salmon aquaculture, an industry that has operated for decades in the state but has come under fire after tens of thousands of nonnative fish escaped into local waters last summer. (Dean Rutz/The Seattle Times via AP, File)
March 02, 2018 - 11:21 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — The Washington Legislature on Friday voted to phase out marine Atlantic salmon aquaculture, an industry that has operated for decades in the state but came under heavy criticism after tens of thousands of nonnative fish escaped into waterways last summer. After lengthy debate, the...
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FILE - In this Friday, Aug. 29, 2014 file photo, Pinot Noir grapes just picked are shown in a bin in Napa, Calif. Federal scientists have determined that a family of widely used pesticides poses a threat to dozens of endangered and threatened species, including Pacific salmon, Atlantic sturgeon and Puget Sound orcas. The National Marine Fisheries Service issued its new biological opinion on three organophosphate pesticides _ chlorpyrifos, diazinon and malathion _ after a years-long court fight by environmental groups. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
January 12, 2018 - 6:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal scientists have determined that a family of widely used pesticides poses a threat to dozens of endangered and threatened species, including Pacific salmon, Atlantic sturgeon and Puget Sound orcas. The National Marine Fisheries Service issued its new biological opinion on...
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FILE - In this April 24, 2014, file photo, young salmon that have been transported by tanker truck from the Coleman National Fish hatchery are loaded into a floating net suspended on a pontoon barge at Mare Island, Calif. A desperate decision to truck baby salmon to their destination in the Pacific Ocean during California's drought, when dry rivers made their usual migration routes unnavigable, has resulted in generations of lost salmon now hard-pressed to find their way back to their normal spawning grounds. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
December 26, 2017 - 2:01 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A desperate decision to truck California's native baby salmon toward the Pacific Ocean during the state's drought may have resulted in generations of lost young salmon now hard-pressed to find their way back to their reproductive grounds. With fewer native fall-run Chinook...
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November 20, 2017 - 5:05 am
SEATTLE (AP) — Harbor seals, sea lions and some fish-eating killer whales have rebounded in the Northeast Pacific Ocean in recent decades. But that boom comes with a trade-off: They're devouring more of the salmon prized by a unique but fragile population of endangered orcas. A new study suggests...
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