Prisons

FILE - In this May 10, 2017, file photo, Wesley Correa-Carmenaty is led into the Woodbury County Jail in Sioux City, Iowa. Prosecutors say the man charged with killing a sheriff's deputy and wounding another while escaping from an Iowa jail will plead guilty. (Tim Hynds/Sioux City Journal via AP, File)
August 09, 2017 - 6:53 pm
COUNCIL BLUFFS, Iowa (AP) — A man charged with killing a sheriff's deputy and wounding another while escaping from an Iowa jail will plead guilty, prosecutors said Wednesday. The Pottawattamie County Attorney's Office said an attorney for Wesley Correa-Carmenaty, 24, informed officials of the...
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August 09, 2017 - 5:36 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — For more than five years, Arizona has been dogged by a federal lawsuit that alleges the state provides shoddy medical care for its prisoners. Now, the state is facing the prospect of millions of dollars in fines over its failure to carry out reforms of its medical system. Arizona...
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August 07, 2017 - 6:23 pm
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Six inmates have snatched keys from three correctional officers at a maximum security prison in Arkansas and are holding the officers in an area where the prisoners now control the keys and the doors. The Arkansas Department of Correction said Monday in a statement that the...
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In this photo taken March 30, 2017, Ismail Royer poses for a photograph in Arlington, Va. Royer was been released from prison after serving more than 13 years on charges that he provided assistance to friends who wanted to join the Taliban after the Sept. 11 attacks. Dozens of convicts serving time in U.S. prisons for terror-related offenses are slated to be released in the next several years, prompting the question: Should Americans be afraid? (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
August 07, 2017 - 3:38 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Dozens of convicts serving time in U.S. prisons for terrorism-related offenses are due to be released in the next several years, raising the question of whether that's something Americans should fear. Since the Sept. 11 attacks, the United States has worked aggressively to foil...
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In this photo taken March 30, 2017, Ismail Royer poses for a photograph in Arlington, Va. Royer was been released from prison after serving more than 13 years on charges that he provided assistance to friends who wanted to join the Taliban after the Sept. 11 attacks. Dozens of convicts serving time in U.S. prisons for terror-related offenses are slated to be released in the next several years, prompting the question: Should Americans be afraid? (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
August 07, 2017 - 3:30 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Since 9/11, the United States has worked aggressively to foil attacks and has imprisoned hundreds of people who joined or helped militant groups. Now, dozens of convicts serving time in U.S. prisons for terrorism-related offenses are slated to complete their sentences and be...
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This undated image provide by the Paulding County Sheriff’s Office shows Branden Powell. Authorities say a manhunt is under way for Powell, an Ohio rape suspect who overpowered a sheriff’s deputy in a transport van and stole his gun and ammunition. (Paulding County Sheriff’s Office via AP)
August 06, 2017 - 1:18 am
PAULDING, Ohio (AP) — A nationwide manhunt is underway for an Ohio rape suspect who overpowered a sheriff's deputy in a transport van and stole his gun and ammunition. Paulding County Sheriff Jason Landers said Saturday that FBI agents and U.S. Marshals have joined the search for 32-year-old...
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In this photo taken March 30, 2017, Ismail Royer poses for a photograph in Arlington, Va. Royer was been released from prison after serving more than 13 years on charges that he provided assistance to friends who wanted to join the Taliban after the Sept. 11 attacks. Dozens of convicts serving time in U.S. prisons for terror-related offenses are slated to be released in the next several years, prompting the question: Should Americans be afraid? (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
August 05, 2017 - 9:45 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Dozens of convicts serving time in U.S. prisons for terrorism-related offenses are due to be released in the next several years, raising the question whether that's something Americans should fear. There's no easy answer. Since the Sept. 11 attacks, the United States has worked...
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A man tosses a football in the street in San Bernardino, Calif., on Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017. Attorney General Jeff Sessions is cracking down on so-called sanctuary cities, threatening to keep federal crime-fighting resources from cities ravaged by violence if they don't cooperate with federal immigration authorities. The Justice Department sent letters to Baltimore, Albuquerque, and Stockton and San Bernardino, Calif., telling them they will be ineligible for a new program if they don't step up efforts to help detain and deport those in the country illegally. (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)
August 03, 2017 - 7:40 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Attorney General Jeff Sessions took new steps Thursday to punish cities he believes are not cooperating with federal immigration agents in a move that was met with bewilderment by local officials who said they did not know why they were being singled out. The Justice...
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FILE - In this Aug. 2, 2017 file photo, Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks in Columbus, Ohio. Sessions moved Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017, to again punish so-called sanctuary cities, this time threatening to deny federal crime-fighting resources to four cities beset by violence if they don’t step up efforts to help detain and deport people living in the country illegally. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete, File)
August 03, 2017 - 5:14 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Attorney General Jeff Sessions took new steps Thursday to punish cities he believes are not cooperating with federal immigration agents in a move that was met with bewilderment by local officials who said they did not know why they were being singled out. The Justice...
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This photo provided by the Martin County, Fla., Sheriff's Office, shows Brady Kilpatrick under arrest Tuesday, Aug. 1, 2017, the last of 12 inmates who used peanut butter to escape from an Alabama jail. The inmates escaped Sunday by writing a number in peanut butter over a cell door. An inexperienced guard in a control room thought he was opening the cell, but the number released a door to the outside. (Martin County Sheriff's Office via AP)
August 03, 2017 - 3:27 am
MIAMI (AP) — Using peanut butter to escape from the Walker County Jail in Alabama isn't as crazy as it sounds. Belinda Ann Weldon, an Alabama attorney familiar with the jail who represents the last of 12 inmates to be captured after escaping Sunday, said she can see how a guard watching remotely...
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