Pornography

FILE - In this Wednesday, June 28, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks during an energy roundtable with tribal, state and local leaders in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, in Washington. Trump’s latest tweets attacking a female TV host would get him fired, or at least reprimanded if he was a regular person or even regular CEO. Of course, he isn’t. But experts say it’s a mistake to think that because the president is getting away with sending out crude tweets, others would too. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
June 30, 2017 - 10:27 am
NEW YORK (AP) — If President Donald Trump were anyone else, he'd be fired, or at least reprimanded, for his latest tweets attacking a female TV host, social media and workplace experts say. And if he were to look for a job, the experts say, these and past tweets would raise red flags for companies...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, June 28, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks during an energy roundtable with tribal, state and local leaders in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, in Washington. Trump’s latest tweets attacking a female TV host would get him fired, or at least reprimanded if he was a regular person or even regular CEO. Of course, he isn’t. But experts say it’s a mistake to think that because the president is getting away with sending out crude tweets, others would too. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
June 30, 2017 - 12:05 am
NEW YORK (AP) — If President Donald Trump were anyone else, he'd be fired, or at least reprimanded, for his latest tweets attacking a female TV host, social media and workplace experts say. And if he were to look for a job, the experts say, these and past tweets would raise red flags for companies...
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In this photo taken March 27, 2008, the Pentagon is seen in this aerial view. Reports of sexual assaults in the military increased slightly last year, U.S. defense officials said Monday, May 1, 2017, and more than half the victims reported negative reactions or retaliation for their complaints. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
May 02, 2017 - 4:01 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Concern is growing across the military about inappropriate social media behavior by those in uniform. In April, sexually explicit photos of female and male Marines were discovered being shared on a secret Facebook page. Months before, service members complained about a similar...
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In this March 14, 2017, photo, Marine Corps Commandant Gen. Robert B. Neller speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington, while testifying before the Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on the investigation of nude photographs of female Marines and other women that were shared on the Facebook page "Marines United." At least 20 victims have now come forward to complain that explicit photos of them are being shared online by active duty and retired members of the Marine Corps and others, a leading Navy investigator said March 17. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
March 17, 2017 - 7:59 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — At least 20 victims have now come forward to complain that explicit photos of them are being shared online by active duty and retired members of the Marine Corps and others, a leading Navy investigator said Friday. Curtis Evans, the division chief for criminal investigations for...
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