Pornography

In this May 15, 2015 file photo, a promotional banner of mobile apps that block harmful contents, is posted on the door at a mobile store in Seoul, South Korea. The banner reads: "Young smartphone users, you must install apps that block harmful content." A South Korean child-monitoring smartphone app that was removed from the market in 2015 after it was found to be riddled with security holes has been reissued under a new name and puts children at risk, researchers said Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man, File)
September 11, 2017 - 9:12 pm
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — A South Korean child-monitoring smartphone app that was removed from the market in 2015 after it was found to be riddled with security flaws has been reissued under a new name and still puts children at risk, researchers said Monday. The app "Cyber Security Zone" is part...
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In this May 15, 2015 file photo, a promotional banner of mobile apps that block harmful contents, is posted on the door at a mobile store in Seoul, South Korea. The banner reads: "Young smartphone users, you must install apps that block harmful content." A South Korean child-monitoring smartphone app that was removed from the market in 2015 after it was found to be riddled with security holes has been reissued under a new name and puts children at risk, researchers said Monday, Sept. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man, File)
September 11, 2017 - 6:46 pm
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — A South Korean child-monitoring smartphone app that was removed from the market in 2015 after it was found to be riddled with security flaws has been reissued under a new name and still puts children at risk, researchers said Monday. The app "Cyber Security Zone" is part...
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August 08, 2017 - 9:40 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Marine Corps for the first time is eyeing a plan to let women attend what has been male-only combat training in Southern California, as officials work to quash recurring problems with sexism and other bad behavior among Marines, according to Marine Corps officials. If...
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July 17, 2017 - 10:50 am
LONDON (AP) — The British government says that starting next year pornography websites will have to verify that their users are at least 18. The government says that from April 2018 websites will have to show they are blocking access by minors, possibly by making users supply credit-card details. A...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, June 28, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks during an energy roundtable with tribal, state and local leaders in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, in Washington. Trump’s latest tweets attacking a female TV host would get him fired, or at least reprimanded if he was a regular person or even regular CEO. Of course, he isn’t. But experts say it’s a mistake to think that because the president is getting away with sending out crude tweets, others would too. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
June 30, 2017 - 10:27 am
NEW YORK (AP) — If President Donald Trump were anyone else, he'd be fired, or at least reprimanded, for his latest tweets attacking a female TV host, social media and workplace experts say. And if he were to look for a job, the experts say, these and past tweets would raise red flags for companies...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, June 28, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks during an energy roundtable with tribal, state and local leaders in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, in Washington. Trump’s latest tweets attacking a female TV host would get him fired, or at least reprimanded if he was a regular person or even regular CEO. Of course, he isn’t. But experts say it’s a mistake to think that because the president is getting away with sending out crude tweets, others would too. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
June 30, 2017 - 12:05 am
NEW YORK (AP) — If President Donald Trump were anyone else, he'd be fired, or at least reprimanded, for his latest tweets attacking a female TV host, social media and workplace experts say. And if he were to look for a job, the experts say, these and past tweets would raise red flags for companies...
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In this photo taken March 27, 2008, the Pentagon is seen in this aerial view. Reports of sexual assaults in the military increased slightly last year, U.S. defense officials said Monday, May 1, 2017, and more than half the victims reported negative reactions or retaliation for their complaints. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
May 02, 2017 - 4:01 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Concern is growing across the military about inappropriate social media behavior by those in uniform. In April, sexually explicit photos of female and male Marines were discovered being shared on a secret Facebook page. Months before, service members complained about a similar...
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In this March 14, 2017, photo, Marine Corps Commandant Gen. Robert B. Neller speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington, while testifying before the Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on the investigation of nude photographs of female Marines and other women that were shared on the Facebook page "Marines United." At least 20 victims have now come forward to complain that explicit photos of them are being shared online by active duty and retired members of the Marine Corps and others, a leading Navy investigator said March 17. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
March 17, 2017 - 7:59 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — At least 20 victims have now come forward to complain that explicit photos of them are being shared online by active duty and retired members of the Marine Corps and others, a leading Navy investigator said Friday. Curtis Evans, the division chief for criminal investigations for...
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