Oceans

Junar Lim takes photos of Ziah Lim, left, and Arsenia Lim, all of Cavite, the Philippines, at gardens in Town Square in Anchorage, Alaska, Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019. Alaska recorded its warmest month ever in July and hot, dry weather has continued in Anchorage and much of the region south of the Alaska Range. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)
August 18, 2019 - 2:13 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska has been America's canary in the coal mine for climate warming, and the yellow bird is swooning. July was Alaska's warmest month ever, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Sea ice melted. Bering Sea fish swam in above-normal temperatures...
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Junar Lim takes photos of Ziah Lim, left, and Arsenia Lim, all of Cavite, the Philippines, at gardens in Town Square in Anchorage, Alaska, Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019. Alaska recorded its warmest month ever in July and hot, dry weather has continued in Anchorage and much of the region south of the Alaska Range. (AP Photo/Dan Joling)
August 17, 2019 - 11:49 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska has been America's canary in the coal mine for climate warming, and the yellow bird is swooning. July was Alaska's warmest month ever, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Sea ice melted. Bering Sea fish swam in above-normal temperatures...
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In this Thursday, Aug. 1, 2019, photo, evidence of a Cascadia earthquake's awesome destructive power is visible at the beach in Neskowin, Ore. A "ghost forest" of Sitka spruces juts up from the beach in the tiny town. The trees were likely buried by tsunami debris 2,000 years earlier, and partially uncovered by storms in 1997. (AP Photo/Andrew Selsky)
August 16, 2019 - 9:30 am
NEWPORT, Ore. (AP) — With sunlight sparkling off surrounding Yaquina Bay, workers are putting up an ocean-studies building, smack in the middle of an area expected to one day be hit by a tsunami. Experts say it's only a matter of time before a shift in a major fault line off the Oregon coast causes...
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President Donald Trump speaks at the Pennsylvania Shell ethylene cracker plant on Tuesday, Aug. 13, 2019 in Monaca, Pa. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
August 13, 2019 - 4:37 pm
MONACA, Pa. (AP) — President Donald Trump sought to take credit Tuesday for the construction of a major manufacturing facility in western Pennsylvania as he tries to reinvigorate supporters in the Rust Belt towns that sent him to the White House in 2016. Trump visited Shell's soon-to-be completed...
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In this image taken on Thursday Aug.1, 2019 large rivers of melting water form on an ice sheet in western Greenland and drain into moulin holes that empty into the ocean from underneath the ice. The heat wave that smashed high temperature records in five European countries a week ago is now over Greenland, accelerating the melting of the island's ice sheet and causing massive ice loss in the Arctic. (Photo via Caspar Haarløv, Into the Ice via AP)
August 03, 2019 - 10:22 am
BERLIN (AP) — The heat wave that smashed high temperature records in five European countries a week ago is now over Greenland, accelerating the melting of the island's ice sheet and causing massive ice loss in the Arctic. Greenland, the world's largest island, is a semi-autonomous Danish territory...
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In this image taken on Thursday Aug.1, 2019 large rivers of melting water form on an ice sheet in western Greenland and drain into moulin holes that empty into the ocean from underneath the ice. The heat wave that smashed high temperature records in five European countries a week ago is now over Greenland, accelerating the melting of the island's ice sheet and causing massive ice loss in the Arctic. (Photo via Caspar Haarløv, Into the Ice via AP)
August 02, 2019 - 4:15 am
BERLIN (AP) — The heat wave that smashed high temperature records in five European countries a week ago is now over Greenland, accelerating the melting of the island's ice sheet and causing massive ice loss in the Arctic. Greenland, the world's largest island, is a semi-autonomous Danish territory...
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FILE - This undated image provided by National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center shows a 5.5-inch long rare pocket shark. A pocket-sized pocket shark found in the Gulf of Mexico has turned out to be a new species, and one that squirts little glowing clouds into the ocean. Researchers from around the Gulf and in New York have named it the American pocket shark, or Mollisquama (mah-lihs-KWAH-muh) mississippiensis (MISS-ih-SIP-ee-EHN-sis). (Mark Grace/National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration National Marine Fisheries Service Southeast Fisheries Science Center via AP, File)
July 19, 2019 - 5:41 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A pocket-sized pocket shark found in the Gulf of Mexico has turned out to be a new species. And the mysterious pouches that it's named for, up near its front fins? Scientists say they squirt little glowing clouds into the ocean. Researchers from around the Gulf and in New York...
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July 17, 2019 - 1:58 am
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — A fisherman man said on Wednesday he was looking for the author of a message in a bottle found off the southern Australian coast 50 years after it was written. Paul Elliot told Australian Broadcasting Corp. that he and his son Jyah found the bottle on the west coast of...
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Ashley Boudreaux ties sandbags Friday, July 12, 2019, in Baton Rouge, La., ahead of Tropical Storm Barry. Barry could harm the Gulf Coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it’s hard to predict how severe the damage will be. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
July 14, 2019 - 5:03 am
Hurricane Barry could affect the environment of the Gulf coast and Lower Mississippi Valley in numerous ways, from accelerating runoff of farmland nutrients to toppling trees and damaging wildlife habitat and fisheries, scientists say. But the extent of the damage — and whether it will be at least...
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FILE - In this Oct. 5, 2017, file photo, residents move a "no wake," sign through flood waters caused by king tides in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Federal scientists, according to a report released Wednesday, July 10, 2019, predict 40 places in the U.S. will experience higher than normal rates of so-called sunny day flooding this year due to rising sea levels and an abnormal El Nino weather system. (Joe Cavaretta/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)
July 10, 2019 - 3:21 pm
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — The federal government is warning Americans to brace for a "floodier" future. Government scientists predict 40 places in the U.S. will experience higher than normal rates of so-called sunny day flooding this year because of rising sea levels and an abnormal El Nino...
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