Oceanography

FILE - In this file photo taken Tuesday, July 24, 2018, provided by the Center for Whale Research, a baby orca whale is being pushed by her mother after being born off the Canada coast near Victoria, British Columbia. Whale researchers are keeping close watch on an endangered orca that has spent the past week carrying and keeping her dead calf afloat in Pacific Northwest waters. The display has struck an emotional chord around the world and highlighted the plight of the declining population of southern resident killer whales that has not seen a successful birth since 2015.(Michael Weiss/Center for Whale Research via AP)
August 01, 2018 - 1:37 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Whale researchers are keeping close watch on an endangered orca that has spent the past week keeping her dead calf afloat in Pacific Northwest waters, a display that has struck an emotional chord around the world and highlighted the plight of the declining population that has not...
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July 17, 2018 - 2:41 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Scientists no longer have to collect poop to get key data on the health of endangered right whales. A new study indicates that under the right conditions, scientist can get real-time hormonal data by collecting the spray from whales' blowholes. Researchers with the Anderson...
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FILE - In this August, 2009, file photo provided by the Department of Defense, a Cook Inlet beluga whale calf, left, and an adult breach near Anchorage, Alaska. A new study concludes that endangered beluga whales in Cook Inlet changed their diet over five decades from saltwater prey to fish and crustaceans influenced by freshwater. The analysis of isotopes in beluga bone and teeth by University of Alaska Fairbanks researchers showed belugas formerly fed on prey that had little contact with freshwater. (Christopher Garner/Department of Defense via AP, File)
June 15, 2018 - 7:22 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Beluga whales in Alaska's Cook Inlet may have changed their diet over five decades from saltwater prey to fish and crustaceans influenced by freshwater, according to a study by University of Alaska Fairbanks researchers. An analysis of isotopes in beluga bone and teeth...
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May 14, 2018 - 9:53 am
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — In a story May 13 about lobster shell strength, The Associated Press reported erroneously that marine biogeochemist Justin Ries attributed the collapse of the southern New England lobster fishery to shell disease. He attributed it to overfishing and population shifts caused...
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FILE - In this March 13, 2017, file photo, people relax on the beach in Waikiki in Honolulu. Many sunscreen makers could soon be forced to change their formulas or be banned from selling lotions in Hawaii. Hawaii state lawmakers on Tuesday passed a measure that would ban the local sale of sunscreens containing oxybenzone and octinoxate by 2021 in an effort to protect coral reefs.(AP Photo/Caleb Jones, File)
May 02, 2018 - 8:56 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Many sunscreen makers could soon be forced to change their formulas or be banned from selling the lotions in Hawaii. State lawmakers passed a measure this week that would ban the sale of sunscreens containing oxybenzone and octinoxate by 2021 in an effort to protect coral reefs...
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In this March 4, 2017, photo, tourists enjoy the popular Maya bay on Phi Phi island, Krabi province. Authorities have ordered the temporary closing of the beach made famous by the Leonardo DiCaprio movie "The Beach" to halt environmental damage caused by too many tourists. (AP Photo/Rajavi Omanee)
March 29, 2018 - 4:08 am
BANGKOK (AP) — The daily hordes of tourists have exhausted the Thai beach made famous by the Leonardo DiCaprio movie. Maya Bay, on Phi Phi Leh island in the Andaman Sea, will be closed to all visitors for four months annually starting this June to allow for the recovery of the battered coral reefs...
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In this Feb. 1, 2018, images made from video and supplied by Dr Regina Eisert and Anthony Powell of the University of Canterbury a minke whale glides under the ice in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. Marine mammal expert Regina Eisert thought minke whales were a little boring until she captured some striking footage of one swimming underwater near Antarctica. Now she thinks they're beautiful. (Regina Eisert/Anthony Powell /University of Canterbury via AP)
March 21, 2018 - 7:39 am
WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — Marine mammal expert Dr. Regina Eisert thought minke whales were a little boring until she captured some striking footage of one swimming underwater near Antarctica. Now she thinks they're beautiful. Eisert said the whales look similar from the surface but that she...
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FILE--In this Jan. 18, 2014, file photo, an endangered female orca leaps from the water while breaching in Puget Sound west of Seattle, Wash. Washington Gov. Jay Inslee is set to establish an executive order Wednesday, March 14, 2018, calling for state actions to protect the unique population of endangered orcas that spend time in Puget Sound. The fish-eating whales have struggled due to lack of food, pollution and noise and disturbances from vessels. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
March 14, 2018 - 9:18 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — With the number of endangered orcas that frequent the inland waters of Washington state at a 30-year low, Gov. Jay Inslee on Wednesday directed state agencies to take immediate and longer-term steps to protect the struggling killer whales. The fish-eating mammals that spend time in...
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In this 2017 photo provided by Simon Pierce, Jonathan Green checks on a fin-mounted satellite tag on a whale shark in the Galapagos Islands area of Ecuador. Despite typically being bigger than a double-decker bus, the elusive whale shark has only tiny, almost useless teeth. It's also one of the least understood animals in the ocean. (simonjpierce.com via AP)
February 28, 2018 - 3:09 am
GALAPAGOS ISLANDS, Ecuador (AP) — Scientists have spent time diving with whale sharks in the Galapagos Islands to help solve some of the most enduring mysteries about the biggest shark in the sea. Despite typically being bigger than a double-decker bus, the elusive whale shark has only tiny, almost...
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In this Aug. 14, 2017 photo, Marie Kesten Zahn, an archaeologist and education coordinator at the Whydah Pirate Museum in West Yarmouth, Mass., probes the concretion surrounding a leg bone that was salvaged from the Whydah shipwreck off the coast of Wellfleet on Cape Cod. Researchers are working to determine if the remains belong to Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy, the captain of the ship. (Merrily Cassidy/Cape Cod Times via AP)
February 19, 2018 - 7:56 pm
YARMOUTH, Mass. (AP) — Researchers are working to use DNA to identify whether a human bone recovered from a Cape Cod shipwreck belongs to the infamous pirate Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy. The Whydah (WIH'-duh) Pirate Museum in Yarmouth, Massachusetts, publicly displayed the bone Monday. It was found...
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