Oceanography

April 23, 2020 - 11:02 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled Thursday that sewage plants and other industries cannot avoid environmental requirements under landmark clean-water protections when they send dirty water on an indirect route to rivers, oceans and other navigable waterways. Rejecting the Trump...
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FILE - In this June 26, 2010 file photo, Plaquemines Parish Coastal Zone Director P.J. Hahn rescues a heavily oiled bird from the waters of Barataria Bay, La., which are laden with oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Ten years after the nation's biggest offshore oil spill fouled its waters, the Gulf of Mexico sparkles in the sunlight and its fish are safe to eat. But scientists who have spent $500 million dollars from BP researching the impact of the Deepwater Horizon disaster have found much to be concerned about. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)
April 20, 2020 - 1:20 am
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Ten years after a well blew wild under a BP platform in the Gulf of Mexico, killing 11 men and touching off the nation’s worst offshore oil spill, gulf waters sparkle in the sunlight, its fish are safe to eat, and thick, black oil no longer visibly stains the beaches and...
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In this handout photo taken in Jan. 2020 and provided by Nekton, scientists lower the “Limiting Factor” submarine into the Mediterranean Sea, part of sea trials before the next stage of the Nekton Mission begins in mid-March. A team of scientists is preparing to dive deep into the depths of the Indian Ocean - into a “Midnight Zone” where light barely reaches, but life still thrives. Scientists from the British-led Nekton Mission plan to survey wildlife and gauge the effects of climate change in the unexplored area. (Nekton via AP)
February 05, 2020 - 12:37 pm
BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — A team of scientists is preparing to dive deep into the depths of the Indian Ocean — into a “Midnight Zone” where light barely reaches but life still thrives. Scientists from the British-led Nekton Mission plan to survey wildlife and gauge the effects of climate change in...
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FILE - In this Jan. 5, 2016, file photo, Guy Runco, director of the Bird Treatment and Learning Center, releases a common murre near the Anchorage small boat harbor in Anchorage, Alaska. Hundreds of thousands of common murres, a fast-flying seabird, died from starvation four winters ago in the North Pacific, and a new research paper attempts to explain why. (AP Photo/Dan Joling, File)
January 15, 2020 - 2:06 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Common murres look like skinny penguins but fly like F-15 fighter jets. The North Pacific seabirds can quickly cover hundreds of miles searching for schools of small forage fish. Their powerful wings let them dive more than 150 feet (46 meters) under water to gorge on...
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January 06, 2020 - 9:06 am
BANGKOK (AP) — A community in southern Thailand has offered a reward for catching whoever stole dozens of unhatched eggs of an endangered turtle species. The Pacific Leatherback turtle eggs were stolen before dawn Sunday from a beach in the southern province of Phang-nga, said Pratom Rassamee, head...
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This Dec. 3, 2019, photo, ecologist Nalini Nadkarni is shown in her lab on the University of Utah campus in Salt Lake City holding a Barbie created to look like her when she's climbing into the treetops to study the rainforest canopy. Nadkarni's childhood climbing trees shaped her career and now she's hoping she can get help kids interested in science in an new way: Barbies. Nadkarni has long created her own "treetop Barbies" and has now helped Mattel and National Geographic create a line of dolls with careers in science and conservation. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
December 30, 2019 - 2:03 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — When Nalini Nadkarni was a kid, she’d run home from school, climb into one of the eight maple trees in her parents’ backyard and spend an afternoon there with an apple and a book. That time in the treetops set the tone for the rest of her life: She’s now a forest ecologist at...
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In this undated photo provided by the Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries, a winter skate rests among seagrass at a monitoring site in the sound off shore from Salem, Mass. Seagrass meadows, found in coastlines all coastal areas around the world except Antarctica's shores, are among the most poorly protected but widespread coastal habitats in the world. Studies have found more than 70 species of seagrass that can reduce erosion and improve water quality, while providing food and shelter for sea creatures. (Tay Evans/Massachusetts Division of Marine Fisheries via AP)
December 22, 2019 - 10:29 am
DURHAM, N.H. (AP) — Peering over the side of his skiff anchored in the middle of New Hampshire’s Great Bay, Fred Short liked what he saw. Just below the surface, the 69-year-old marine ecologist noticed beds of bright green seagrass swaying in the waist-deep water. It was the latest sign that these...
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In this photo taken Dec. 13, 2019, provided by Marine Life Studies Whale Entanglement Team, a young humpback whale entangled in fishing gear is freed in Monterey Bay, Calif., days after it was first spotted by a fisherman. (Marine Life Studies via AP)
December 17, 2019 - 4:35 pm
MOSS LANDING, Calif. (AP) — A rescue team helped free a young humpback whale that was tangled in fishing gear south of San Francisco days after a fisherman first spotted it, a conservation group said Tuesday. The team in a small inflatable boat in Monterey Bay attached five large, hot-pink buoys to...
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This undated photo provided by the Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab shows two humpback whales in the Antarctic. Whales are big, but why aren't they bigger? A new study released on Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019 says it's basically about how many calories they can take in. (Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab via AP)
December 14, 2019 - 9:09 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Whales are big, but why aren't they bigger? A new study says it's basically about how many calories they can take in. That's the conclusion of researchers who used small boats to chase down 300 whales of various species around the world. They reached out with a long pole to attach...
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FILE - In this Sept. 5, 2018 file photo, a lobster walks over the top of a lobster trap off the coast of Biddeford, Maine. A pair of studies published in 2019 by University of Maine scientists suggest the U.S. lobster industry is headed for a period of decline, but likely not a crash. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
December 01, 2019 - 1:50 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — A pair of studies by Maine-based scientists suggest the U.S. lobster industry is headed for a period of decline, but likely not a crash. Lobster fishermen have brought in record hauls this decade, a period in which Maine catches that previously rarely topped 70 million pounds...
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