Medical technology

FILE - In this March 14, 2014, file photo, a representative of GCHQ points to a screen showing all the teams progress in completing the task during a mock cyberattack scenario with teams of amateur computer experts taking part and trying to fight this simulated attack in London. Computer systems across a major hospital chain operating in the U.S. and Britain were down Monday, Sept. 28, 2020, due to what the company termed an unspecified technology “security issue.” Universal Health Services Inc., which operates more than 400 hospitals and other clinical care facilities, said in a short statement p osted to its website Monday that its network was offline and doctors and nurses were resorting to “back-up processes” including paper records. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant, File)
September 28, 2020 - 11:33 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A computer outage at a major hospital chain thrust healthcare facilities across the U.S. into chaos Monday, with treatment impeded as doctors and nurses already burdened by the coronavirus pandemic were forced to rely on paper backup systems. Universal Health Services Inc., which...
Read More
In this Aug. 24, 2020, photo Jean Grady smiles as she poses at her home in Westford, Vt. Grady wears an insulin pump to help manage her diabetes. Before the pandemic, Medicare rules required her make regular two-hour, one-way trips to New Hampshire to meet with her doctor to discuss her treatment. Medicare rule changes during the pandemic now makes it possible for her to meet with her doctor remotely, saving her from hours on the road. (AP Photo/Wilson Ring)
August 30, 2020 - 1:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Telehealth is a bit of American ingenuity that seems to have paid off in the coronavirus pandemic. Medicare temporarily waived restrictions predating the smartphone era and now there's a push to make telemedicine widely available in the future. Consultations via tablets, laptops...
Read More
Nurse practitioner Sadie Paez uses a stethoscope to listen to the chest of William Merry, who is recovering from pneumonia at his home, Thursday, July 9, 2020, in Ipswich, Mass. As hospitals care for people with COVID-19 and try to keep others from catching the virus, more patients are opting to be treated where they feel safest: at home. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
August 20, 2020 - 11:47 am
As hospitals care for people with COVID-19 and try to keep others from catching the virus, more patients are opting to be treated where they feel safest: at home. Across the U.S., “hospital at home” programs are taking off amid the pandemic, thanks to communications technology, portable medical...
Read More
Democratic presidential candidate, former Vice President Joe Biden puts on a face mask to protect against the spread of the new coronavirus as he departs after speaking at Alexis Dupont High School in Wilmington, Del., Tuesday, June 30, 2020. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
July 07, 2020 - 12:32 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Joe Biden is promising to shift production of medical equipment and other key pandemic-fighting products “back to U.S. soil," creating jobs and bolstering a domestic supply chain he says has been exposed as inadequate and vulnerable by the coronavirus outbreak. The presumptive...
Read More
FILE - In this May 11, 2020, file photo light shines in a patient pod at a temporary alternate care site constructed in response to the coronavirus outbreak inside the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington. People are still more likely to prefer the private sector than the government on driving innovation in health care, improving quality and, by a narrower margin, providing coverage, according to the survey by the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy and The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, FIle)
June 08, 2020 - 8:04 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The coronavirus pushed hospitals to the edge, and millions of workers lost job-based coverage in the economic shutdown to slow the spread, but a new poll suggests Americans have remarkably little interest in big changes to health care as a result of the pandemic. People are still...
Read More
President Donald Trump holds a face mask in his left hand as speaks during a tour of Ford's Rawsonville Components Plant that has been converted to making personal protection and medical equipment, Thursday, May 21, 2020, in Ypsilanti, Mich. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
May 21, 2020 - 10:18 pm
YPSILANTI TOWNSHIP, Mich. (AP) — Pandemic politics shadowed President Donald Trump's trip to Michigan on Thursday as he highlighted lifesaving medical devices, with the president and officials from the electoral battleground state clashing over federal aid, mail-in ballots and face masks. Trump...
Read More
In this image provided Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health, Respiratory Care Practitioner Craig Skirvin, wears a face shield, Friday, May 1, 2020, at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center;s Medical Intensive Care Unit, where it cares for COVID-19 patients in Lebanon, N.H. The hospital had extra face shields but needed hand sanitizer, so it swapped with another hospital on one of several new online matchmaking platforms that enable hospitals to swap supplies or get donations of them to quickly fill supply gaps. (Mark L. Washburn/Dartmouth-Hitchcock Health via AP)
May 12, 2020 - 10:52 am
Facing shortages of protective equipment, two New England hospital systems tried the latest twist in internet matchmaking: online swap meets. As the coronavirus pandemic stretches on, online platforms have popped up to match hospitals that need masks, gowns, ventilators and even doctors with those...
Read More
May 12, 2020 - 7:20 am
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — The U.S. government is donating “up to 1,000” ventilators to South Africa to help the country respond to COVID-19 as the Trump administration addresses criticism that it hasn't done enough for countries in need. “South Africa is the first country in the world to receive this...
Read More
May 11, 2020 - 1:50 pm
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — Bosnia’s state prosecutors say about a hundred ventilators imported from China by a private company and paid for by the country's government have been found to be useless for COVID-19 patients. The little known fruit-processing firm, with no license to import...
Read More
French President Emmanuel Macron, wearing a protective face mask, speaks with schoolchildren during a class at the Pierre Ronsard elementary school Tuesday, May 5 2020 in Poissy, outside Paris. Starting from May 11, all French businesses will be allowed to resume activity and schools will start gradually reopening. (Ian Langsdon, Pool via AP)
May 05, 2020 - 10:09 am
The Latest on the coronavirus pandemic. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. TOP OF THE HOUR: — 4 new cases in South Korea, China show work on...
Read More

Pages