Medical research

FILE - In this Wednesday, Aug. 5, 2020 file photo, senior Clinical Research Nurse Ajithkumar Sukumaran prepares the COVID-19 vaccine to administer to a volunteer, at a clinic in London. U.K. researchers said Tuesday Oct. 20, 2020, they are preparing to begin a controversial experiment that will infect healthy volunteers with the new coronavirus to study the disease in hopes of speeding up development of a vaccine. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File)
October 20, 2020 - 1:54 pm
LONDON (AP) — Danica Marcos wants to be infected with COVID-19. While other people are wearing masks and staying home to avoid the disease, the 22-year-old Londoner has volunteered to contract the new coronavirus as part of a controversial study that hopes to speed development of a vaccine. Marcos...
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In this Sept. 24, 2020, file photo, an employee manually inspects syringes of the SARS CoV-2 Vaccine for COVID-19 produced by Sinovac at its factory in Beijing. China is rapidly increasing the number of people receiving its experimental coronavirus vaccines, with a city offering one to the general public and a biotech company providing another free to students going abroad. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
October 16, 2020 - 6:50 am
TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — China is rapidly increasing the number of people receiving its experimental coronavirus vaccines, with a city offering one to the general public and a biotech company providing another free to students going abroad. The city of Jiaxing, south of Shanghai, is offering a vaccine...
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AP Illustration/Peter Hamlin;
October 15, 2020 - 3:08 am
Does the flu vaccine affect my chances of getting COVID-19? The flu vaccine protects you from seasonal influenza, not the coronavirus — but avoiding the flu is especially important this year. Health officials and medical groups are urging people to get either the flu shot or nasal spray, so that...
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A man wearing a face mask walks past an entrance to Belfast City Hospital, Northern Ireland, Wednesday, Oct. 14, 2020. Northern Ireland introducing the tightest COVID-19 restrictions in the United Kingdom on Wednesday, closing schools for two weeks and pubs and restaurants for a month. “This is not the time for trite political points," First Minister Arlene Foster told lawmakers at the regional assembly in Belfast. “This is the time for solutions." (Brian Lawless/PA via AP)
October 14, 2020 - 9:33 am
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say a comparison of 21 developed countries during the start of the coronavirus pandemic shows that those with early lockdowns and well-prepared national health systems avoided large numbers of additional deaths due to the outbreak. In a study published Wednesday by the...
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AP Illustration/Peter Hamlin;
October 13, 2020 - 3:05 am
How long can I expect a COVID-19 illness to last? It depends. Most coronavirus patients have mild to moderate illness and recover quickly. Older, sicker patients tend to take longer to recover. That includes those who are obese, or have high blood pressure and other chronic diseases. The World...
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FILE - This September 2020 photo provided by Johnson & Johnson shows a single-dose COVID-19 vaccine being developed by the company. A late-stage study of Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine candidate has been paused while the company investigates whether a study participant’s “unexplained illness” is related to the shot, the company announced Monday, Oct. 12, 2020. (Cheryl Gerber/Courtesy of Johnson & Johnson via AP, File)
October 12, 2020 - 10:27 pm
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. (AP) — A late-stage study of Johnson & Johnson’s COVID-19 vaccine candidate has been paused while the company investigates whether a study participant’s “unexplained illness” is related to the shot. The company said in a statement Monday evening that illnesses, accidents and...
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FILE -- In this March 14, 2016 file photo American biochemist Jennifer A. Doudna, left, and the French microbiologist Emmanuelle Charpentier, right, poses for a photo in Frankfurt, Germany. French scientist Emmanuelle Charpentier and American Jennifer A. Doudna have won the Nobel Prize 2020 in chemistry for developing a method of genome editing likened to ‘molecular scissors’ that offer the promise of one day curing genetic diseases. (Alexander Heinl/dpa via AP)
October 08, 2020 - 4:29 pm
STOCKHOLM (AP) — The Nobel Prize in chemistry went to two researchers Wednesday for a gene-editing tool that has revolutionized science by providing a way to alter DNA, the code of life — technology already being used to try to cure a host of diseases and raise better crops and livestock...
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September 30, 2020 - 8:20 am
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say genes that some people have inherited from their Neanderthal ancestors may increase the likelihood of suffering severe forms of COVID-19. A study by European scientists published Wednesday by the journal Nature identifies a cluster of genes that are linked to a higher...
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People board a bus outside Waterloo station in London, Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020, after Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced a range of new restrictions to combat the rise in coronavirus cases in England, Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020. (Dominic Lipinski/PA via AP)
September 25, 2020 - 8:38 am
LONDON (AP) — U.S.-based Novavax has begun a late stage trial of its potential COVID-19 vaccine in the United Kingdom because the high-level of the coronavirus circulating in the country is likely to produce quick results, the pharmaceutical company said. Novavax plans to test the effectiveness of...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Aug. 5, 2020 file photo, senior Clinical Research Nurse Ajithkumar Sukumaran prepares the COVID 19 vaccine to administer to a volunteer, at a clinic in London. The British government on Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020 says it may take part in a study that tries to deliberately infect volunteers who have been given an experimental vaccine against the coronavirus in an effort to more quickly determine if the vaccine works. The approach, called a challenge study, is risky but proponents think it may produce results faster than typical studies, which wait to see if volunteers who have been given an experimental treatment or a dummy version get sick. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File)
September 24, 2020 - 4:37 pm
LONDON (AP) — The British government says it may take part in a study that tries to deliberately infect volunteers who have been given an experimental vaccine against the coronavirus in an effort to more quickly determine if the vaccine works. The approach, called a challenge study, is risky but...
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