Marine biology

In this May 13, 2017 photo, an activist holds a sign during a protest outside Sea Life Park in Waimanalo, Hawaii. A marine mammal that has contributed to groundbreaking science for the past 30 years is again making waves after being sold to the marine amusement park in Hawaii. Kina is a false killer whale, a large member of the dolphin family. Animal-rights activists say she deserves a peaceful retirement in an ocean-based refuge but is instead being traumatized by confinement in concrete tanks at Sea Life Park. But Kina's former Navy trainer and a longtime marine mammal researcher say no such sea sanctuaries exist, and the park is the best place for the 40-year-old toothy cetacean. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)
August 08, 2017 - 4:29 am
WAIMANALO, Hawaii (AP) — A Hawaii marine park's purchase of Kina, a 40-year-old false killer whale long used in echolocation research, has reignited a debate about captive marine mammals and the places that care for them. Most of the world's captive cetaceans - dolphins, whales and porpoises - are...
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FILE - In this Aug. 3, 2014, file photo, an algae bloom covers Lake Erie near the City of Toledo water intake crib off the shore of Curtice, Ohio. Scientists are predicting a "significant" algae bloom will form this summer on western Lake Erie, a continuing health hazard in a region where algae toxins forced a temporary tap water shutdown in 2014. (AP Photo/Haraz N. Ghanbari, File)
July 13, 2017 - 2:58 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — A "significant" harmful algae bloom is expected to form in western Lake Erie this summer, though it probably won't be as large as some previous formations that posed health risks and hampered tourism, scientists said Thursday. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric...
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A blue whale skeleton is exhibited in the Hintze Hall at the Natural History Museum in London, Thursday July 13, 2017, replacing the Diplodocus dinosaur which will go on a tour of Britain. Britain's Kate, Duchess of Cambridge, Patron of the Natural History Museum, is due to attend the opening of the museum's new Hintze Hall on Thursday. (Steve Parsons/PA via AP)
July 13, 2017 - 12:54 pm
LONDON (AP) — Britain's Natural History Museum in London has suspended a gigantic blue whale skeleton in its main entrance — drawing attention to vanishing species in an environment under strain. Scientists named the 25.2-meter (82-foot) whale "Hope," recognizing the role of science in safeguarding...
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June 18, 2017 - 11:00 am
BANGOR, Maine (AP) — Fewer of North America's Atlantic salmon are making it back to rivers to spawn, which bodes poorly for the future of the imperiled fish, an international conservation group says. Atlantic salmon were once abundant in the rivers of New England and Atlantic Canada, but they are...
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June 05, 2017 - 1:33 pm
UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Secretary-General Antonio Guterres has opened the first-ever U.N. conference on oceans with a warning that the lifeblood of the planet is "under threat as never before," with one recent study warning that discarded plastic garbage could outweigh fish by 2050 if nothing is done...
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In this photo taken July 9, 2014, humpback whales feed at the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary off Cape Cod near Provincetown, Mass. A new study explains how the baleen whale family, which includes humpback whales, grew seemingly suddenly only a few million years ago from smaller creatures to the ocean giants they are now. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
May 23, 2017 - 9:52 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists think they have answered a whale of a mystery: How the ocean creatures got so huge so quickly. A few million years ago, the largest whales, averaged maybe 15 feet long. That's big, but you could still hold a fossil skull in two hands. Then seemingly overnight, one type...
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May 23, 2017 - 7:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists think they have answered a whale of a mystery: How the ocean creatures got so huge so quickly. A few million years ago, the largest whales, averaged maybe 15 feet long. That's big, but you could still hold a fossil skull in two hands. Then seemingly overnight, one type...
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FILE - In this July 13, 2007 file photo, workers with the Pebble Mine project test drill in the Bristol Bay region of Alaska near the village of Iliamma. The Trump administration settled a lawsuit Friday, May 12, 2017, over the proposed development of a massive gold and copper mine at the headwaters of one of Alaska's premier salmon fisheries. The Environmental Protection Agency settled the long-running case with the Pebble Limited Partnership, agreeing to allow the Canadian-owned company to seek a federal permit to build its mine near Bristol Bay. (AP Photo/Al Grillo, File)
May 12, 2017 - 2:14 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — In a sharp reversal, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has cleared a way for the company seeking to develop a massive copper and gold deposit near the headwaters of a world-class salmon fishery in southwest Alaska to pursue permits. As part of a court settlement with the...
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In this photo taken March 28, 2017, Bill Fairgrieve, a fisheries research biologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, holds a sablefish at a research facility in Manchester, Wash. Scientists are studying sablefish genetics and investigating ways to make it easier and more efficient to commercially grow and farm the fish as part of a larger effort by NOAA to support marine aquaculture as a possible solution to feed a growing demand worldwide for seafood. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
May 07, 2017 - 10:52 am
PORT ORCHARD, Wash. (AP) — The dark gray fish prized for its buttery flavor live deep in the ocean, so researchers keep their lab cold and dark to simulate ideal conditions for sablefish larvae. A biologist shines his dim red headlamp and uses an ultrasound to scan the belly of an anesthetized...
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In this photo taken March 28, 2017, Bill Fairgrieve, a fisheries research biologist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, holds a sablefish at a research facility in Manchester, Wash. Scientists are studying sablefish genetics and investigating ways to make it easier and more efficient to commercially grow and farm the fish as part of a larger effort by NOAA to support marine aquaculture as a possible solution to feed a growing demand worldwide for seafood. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
May 07, 2017 - 10:48 am
PORT ORCHARD, Wash. (AP) — The dark gray fish prized for its buttery flavor live deep in the ocean, so researchers keep their lab cold and dark to simulate ideal conditions for sablefish larvae. A biologist shines his dim red headlamp and uses an ultrasound to scan the belly of an anesthetized...
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