Marine biology

In this Aug. 4, 2019 photo provided by Taylor Williams, a new species of seaweed covers dead a coral reef at Pearl and Hermes Atoll in the remote Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Researchers say the recently discovered species of seaweed is killing large patches of coral on once-pristine reefs and is rapidly spreading across one of the most remote and protected ocean environments on earth. A study from the University of Hawaii and others says the seaweed is spreading more rapidly than anything they've seen in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, a nature reserve that stretches more than 1,300 miles north of the main Hawaiian Islands. The algae easily breaks off and rolls across the ocean floor like tumbleweed, scientists say, covering nearby reefs in thick vegetation that out-competes coral for space, sunlight and nutrients. (Taylor Williams/College of Charleston via AP)
July 07, 2020 - 2:58 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Researchers say a recently discovered species of seaweed is killing large patches of coral on once-pristine reefs and is rapidly spreading across one of the most remote and protected ocean environments on earth. A study from the University of Hawaii and others says the seaweed is...
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This 2014 microscope photo provided by Dr. F. Dahlke shows 1.5 mm diameter eggs of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Global warming looks like it will be a far bigger problem for the world’s fish species than scientists first thought, since a study led by Dahlke released on Thursday, July 2, 2020 shows that when fish are spawning or are embryos they are far more vulnerable to hotter water. (Dr. F. Dahlke via AP)
July 02, 2020 - 2:04 pm
Global warming looks like it will be a bigger problem for the world’s fish species than scientists first thought: A new study shows that when fish are spawning or are embryos they are more vulnerable to hotter water. With medium-level human-caused climate change expected by the end of the century,...
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FILE - In this June 26, 2010 file photo, Plaquemines Parish Coastal Zone Director P.J. Hahn rescues a heavily oiled bird from the waters of Barataria Bay, La., which are laden with oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Ten years after the nation's biggest offshore oil spill fouled its waters, the Gulf of Mexico sparkles in the sunlight and its fish are safe to eat. But scientists who have spent $500 million dollars from BP researching the impact of the Deepwater Horizon disaster have found much to be concerned about. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)
April 20, 2020 - 1:20 am
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Ten years after a well blew wild under a BP platform in the Gulf of Mexico, killing 11 men and touching off the nation’s worst offshore oil spill, gulf waters sparkle in the sunlight, its fish are safe to eat, and thick, black oil no longer visibly stains the beaches and...
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FILE - In this Jan. 5, 2016, file photo, Guy Runco, director of the Bird Treatment and Learning Center, releases a common murre near the Anchorage small boat harbor in Anchorage, Alaska. Hundreds of thousands of common murres, a fast-flying seabird, died from starvation four winters ago in the North Pacific, and a new research paper attempts to explain why. (AP Photo/Dan Joling, File)
January 15, 2020 - 2:06 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Common murres look like skinny penguins but fly like F-15 fighter jets. The North Pacific seabirds can quickly cover hundreds of miles searching for schools of small forage fish. Their powerful wings let them dive more than 150 feet (46 meters) under water to gorge on...
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January 06, 2020 - 9:06 am
BANGKOK (AP) — A community in southern Thailand has offered a reward for catching whoever stole dozens of unhatched eggs of an endangered turtle species. The Pacific Leatherback turtle eggs were stolen before dawn Sunday from a beach in the southern province of Phang-nga, said Pratom Rassamee, head...
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This Dec. 3, 2019, photo, ecologist Nalini Nadkarni is shown in her lab on the University of Utah campus in Salt Lake City holding a Barbie created to look like her when she's climbing into the treetops to study the rainforest canopy. Nadkarni's childhood climbing trees shaped her career and now she's hoping she can get help kids interested in science in an new way: Barbies. Nadkarni has long created her own "treetop Barbies" and has now helped Mattel and National Geographic create a line of dolls with careers in science and conservation. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
December 30, 2019 - 2:03 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — When Nalini Nadkarni was a kid, she’d run home from school, climb into one of the eight maple trees in her parents’ backyard and spend an afternoon there with an apple and a book. That time in the treetops set the tone for the rest of her life: She’s now a forest ecologist at...
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This undated photo provided by the Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab shows two humpback whales in the Antarctic. Whales are big, but why aren't they bigger? A new study released on Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019 says it's basically about how many calories they can take in. (Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab via AP)
December 14, 2019 - 9:09 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Whales are big, but why aren't they bigger? A new study says it's basically about how many calories they can take in. That's the conclusion of researchers who used small boats to chase down 300 whales of various species around the world. They reached out with a long pole to attach...
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FILE - In this Sept. 5, 2018 file photo, a lobster walks over the top of a lobster trap off the coast of Biddeford, Maine. A pair of studies published in 2019 by University of Maine scientists suggest the U.S. lobster industry is headed for a period of decline, but likely not a crash. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
December 01, 2019 - 1:50 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — A pair of studies by Maine-based scientists suggest the U.S. lobster industry is headed for a period of decline, but likely not a crash. Lobster fishermen have brought in record hauls this decade, a period in which Maine catches that previously rarely topped 70 million pounds...
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This Nov. 5, 2019 photo provided by Oregon State University shows whale bones from a 78-foot blue whale that washed near Gold Beach, Ore. The carcass of the giant blue whale that's been submerged off the Oregon coast for more than three years was hauled to the surface so it can be reassembled, studied and put on public display, scientists with Oregon State University said Friday, Nov. 22, 2019. The dead whale, which was about as long as two school buses, washed ashore near Gold Beach in 2015. (Michelle Klampe/Oregon State University via AP)
November 22, 2019 - 8:42 pm
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The carcass of a giant blue whale that has been submerged off the Oregon coast for more than three years was hauled to the surface so it can be reassembled, studied and put on public display, scientists with Oregon State University said Friday. The dead whale, which was about...
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File-Picture taken in August 2017 show linear clusters of trilobites (arthropods) on the surface of the rock slab. These fossils come the Fezouata Shale in Morocco (near Zagora). Their age is 480 million years. The trilobites are all oriented towards the same direction. The head part has a long spine in the front. There are also two lateral spines along the animal's body. (AP Photo/Jean Vannier)
October 17, 2019 - 11:55 am
BERLIN (AP) — Ever felt like you've been queuing forever? Scientists say fossils found in Morocco suggest the practice of forming orderly lines may date back 480 million years and could have had evolutionary advantages. Their study, published Thursday in the journal Scientific Reports, describes...
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