Laws

FILE - In this March 21, 2019 file photo, Acoma Pueblo Gov. Brian Vallo poses outside the Pueblo's cultural center about 60 miles west of Albuquerque, New Mexico. A ceremonial shield at the center of a yearslong international debate over exporting of sacred Native American objects to foreign markets has returned to New Mexico. U.S. and Acoma Pueblo officials planned Monday, Nov. 18 to announce the shield’s return from Paris, where it had been listed for bidding in 2016 before the EVE auction house took the rare step of halting its sale. “It will be a day of high emotion and thanksgiving,” Vallo said ahead of the shield’s expected return to his tribe. (AP Photo/Felicia Fonseca, File)
November 18, 2019 - 10:34 am
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — When a ceremonial Native American shield was returned last week to New Mexico, tribal leaders were there to greet the sacred piece that held a place in their cycle of ceremonies until it vanished from their centuries-old, mesa-top village in the 1970s. Nearly four years ago...
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FILE - In this Nov. 4, 2019, file photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, Chinese President Xi Jinping, right, poses with Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam for a photo during a meeting in Shanghai, China. A sharp escalation of violence in Hong Kong has once again raised the question of how China's central government will respond. Experts said national security measures and deployment of the armed forces remain possibilities, though Beijing may just as likely allow destruction to continue unfolding. (Ju Peng/Xinhua via AP, File)
November 13, 2019 - 12:37 am
BEIJING (AP) — A sharp escalation of violence in Hong Kong is once again raising the question of how China's central government will respond: Will it intervene, or allow the chaos to persist? The Liaison Office, which represents mainland authorities in Hong Kong, said Wednesday that actions in the...
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FILE - In this Friday, Nov. 13, 2009 file photo a caravan of trucks from the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, Calif., drive around Los Angeles City Hall during a protest against container fees being assessed against independent truckers. The California Trucking Association has filed what appears to be the first lawsuit challenging a sweeping new labor law that seeks to give wage and benefit protections to workers in the so-called gig economy, including rideshare drivers at companies such as Uber and Lyft. The federal lawsuit filed Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019, contends that the legislation violates federal law and would deprive more than 70,000 independent truckers' of their ability to work. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)
November 12, 2019 - 9:24 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The California Trucking Association on Tuesday filed what appears to be the first lawsuit challenging a sweeping new labor law that seeks to give wage and benefit protections to workers in the so-called gig economy, including rideshare drivers at companies such as Uber and...
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FILE - In this March 21, 2018, file photo, Olivier Niggli, world anti-doping agency (WADA) Director General, delivers his speech during the opening day of the 2018 WADA annual symposium, at the Swiss Tech Convention Center, in Lausanne, Switzerland. A key American delegate at the World Anti-Doping Agency meetings lashed out at the agency’s director for using government money in an attempt to reshape U.S. legislation designed to fight drugs in sports. At the WADA board meeting Thursday, Nov. 7, 2019, Kendel Ehrlich of the U.S. Office of National Drug Control Policy seized on an Associated Press story from the previous day that described efforts by WADA and the International Olympic Committee to lobby for substantive changes to the Rodchenkov Act. (Jean-Christophe Bott/Keystone via AP, File)
November 07, 2019 - 4:52 pm
KATOWICE, Poland (AP) — A key American delegate at the World Anti-Doping Agency meetings lashed out at the agency's director for using government money in hopes of reshaping U.S. legislation designed to fight drugs in sports. At the WADA board meeting Thursday, Kendel Ehrlich of the U.S. Office of...
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Virginia Giovernor Ralph Northam, center, is surrounded by media outside his office at the State Capitol in Richmond, Va., Wednesday, Nov. 6, 2019. Northam had just left a meeting with his Cabinet and was questioned about the previous night's election results which gave Democrats control of the Virginia House of Delegates and Senate. (Bob Brown/Richmond Times-Dispatch via AP)
November 06, 2019 - 7:34 pm
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam promised Wednesday to ride a wave of voter dissatisfaction with President Donald Trump to turn the Old Dominion into a state where gun laws are stricter, the environment is cleaner and cities have greater leeway to take down Confederate statues. The...
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FILE - In this Monday, Nov. 4, 2019, file photo, President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign event in Lexington, Ky. California’s Supreme Court is considering whether Trump must disclose his tax returns if he wants to be a candidate in the state’s primary election next spring. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
November 06, 2019 - 2:53 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California's Supreme Court justices seemed skeptical Wednesday of a state law requiring President Donald Trump to disclose his tax returns if he wants to be a candidate in the state's primary election next spring. The justices wondered in a rapid-fire hour of questioning...
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FILE - In this Monday, June 25, 2012, file photo, a small crowd protests at the Arizona State Building in Tucson, Ariz., during a rally after the U.S. Supreme Court's decision on Arizona SB1070. On Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019, residents voted not to designate Tucson a “sanctuary city” with further restrictions on how and when police officers can enforce immigration laws. The initiative explicitly aimed to neuter the 2010 Arizona immigration law known as SB1070, which drew mass protests and a boycott of the state. Courts threw out much of the law but upheld the requirement for officers to check immigration papers when they suspect someone is in the country illegally. (David Sanders/Arizona Daily Star via AP, File)
November 06, 2019 - 3:46 am
TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — After Arizona passed a law that required local police to check the immigration status of people suspected to be in the country illegally, the state's second-largest city wanted to send a message. The Democrats who control Tucson designated their town an "immigrant welcoming...
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Women shout outside the Justice Ministry in Madrid, Spain, Monday, Nov. 4, 2019. Thousands in Spain are demonstrating to demand changes in criminal laws and the country's judiciary after a new ruling on a sex assault case revived the debate over the fair treatment of victims. Monday's protests come after five men accused of gang raping an unconscious 14-year-old three years ago were sentenced between 10 to 12 years behind bars for sexual abuse instead of assault or rape.(AP Photo/Paul White)
November 04, 2019 - 2:09 pm
MADRID (AP) — Thousands of Spaniards have taken to the streets demanding changes in the country's criminal law, following a ruling on a sex assault case that was widely criticized as denying victims fair treatment. Monday's protests across Spain come after five men accused of gang-raping an...
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FILE - In this Aug. 29, 2019, file photo, Oklahoma state Rep. Jason Lowe, D-Oklahoma City, gestures to a stack of petitions during a news conference in Oklahoma City. An Oklahoma judge has rejected an attempt by a Democratic state lawmaker and gun safety advocates to stop a new law from taking effect that would allow most people in the state to carry a firearm in public without a background check or training. Oklahoma County District Judge Don Andrews on Wednesday, Oct. 30, rejected a request by Oklahoma City Rep. Lowe for a temporary injunction to stop the so-called "permitless carry" law from taking effect Friday. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki File)
October 30, 2019 - 6:54 pm
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — An Oklahoma judge on Wednesday rejected an attempt by a Democratic state lawmaker and gun safety advocates to block a new law that will allow most people in the state to carry a firearm in public without a background check or training. After hearing arguments from both sides,...
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Akamine Kiarie, a college student, says working for Lyft as an independent contractor gives him the freedom to work when he wants and still be able to attend classes, during a news conference in Sacramento, Calif., Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019. Kiarie supports a proposed ballot initiative by a group called Protect App-Based Drivers and Services that it will push a ballot initiative challenging a recently signed law that makes it harder for companies to label workers as independent contractors. If approved by voters the initiative would guarantee that drivers remain independent contractors but also receive a minimum wage and money for health insurance. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
October 29, 2019 - 5:39 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Some of the country's largest ride-sharing companies proposed a California law on Tuesday that would let them continue to treat drivers as independent contractors while also guaranteeing them a minimum wage and money for health insurance. The state Legislature enacted...
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