Law enforcement technology

FILE - In this Oct. 10, 2017 file photo, the Supreme Court in Washington is seen at sunset. In a 5-4 decision Friday, The Supreme Court says police generally need a search warrant if they want to track criminal suspects' movements by collecting information about where they've used their cellphones. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
June 23, 2018 - 2:07 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Police generally need a warrant to look at records that reveal where cellphone users have been, the Supreme Court ruled Friday in a big victory for privacy interests in the digital age. The justices' 5-4 decision marks a big change in how police may obtain information that phone...
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June 22, 2018 - 9:24 pm
HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — The Latest on xxxxxxx (all times local): 9 p.m. A brand new school safety law in Pennsylvania is designed to set up state-administered programs to distribute grants and take anonymous reports of dangerous activities or threats of violence in schools. Gov. Tom Wolf signed the...
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FILE- In this Tuesday, May 2, 2017, file photo, Verizon corporate signage is captured on a store in Manhattan's Midtown area, in New York. Verizon is pledging to stop selling data to outsiders through middlemen that can pinpoint the location of mobile phones, the Associated Press has learned. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)
June 19, 2018 - 9:03 pm
Verizon, AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile have pledged to stop providing information on U.S. phone owners' locations to data brokers, stepping back from a business practice that has drawn criticism for endangering privacy. The data has apparently allowed outside companies to pinpoint the location of...
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FILE - This Sept. 6, 2012, file photo, shows the Amazon logo. The American Civil Liberties Union and other privacy activists are asking Amazon to stop marketing a powerful facial recognition tool to police, saying law enforcement agencies could use the technology to "easily build a system to automate the identification and tracking of anyone." (AP Photo/Reed Saxon, File)
May 22, 2018 - 11:27 am
SEATTLE (AP) — The American Civil Liberties Union and other privacy activists are asking Amazon to stop marketing a powerful facial recognition tool to police, saying law enforcement agencies could use the technology to "easily build a system to automate the identification and tracking of anyone."...
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In this photo taken March 15, 2018, a dispatcher in Roswell, Ga., works with a variety of screens while handling a 911 call. The Roswell call center is one of the few in the United States that accepts text messages. This year is the 50th anniversary of the first 911 call placed in the United States and authorities say it is in desperate need to have its technology modernized. (AP Photo/Lisa Marie Pane)
May 16, 2018 - 2:58 pm
ROSWELL, Ga. (AP) — High school students hiding from the gunman in Parkland, Florida, were forced to whisper in calls to 911 for fear of tipping off their location. Others texted friends and family who then relayed information to emergency dispatchers over the phone. A few months later, a woman in...
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May 01, 2018 - 12:02 pm
SAN DIEGO (AP) — U.S. Customs and Border Protection is starting tests of body-worn cameras for employees at nine locations, potentially leading to a broad rollout that would make it the first federal law enforcement agency to use them on a large scale. The nation's largest law enforcement agency...
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FILE - In this Nov. 3, 2017, file photo, residents walk through a security checkpoint into the Hotan Bazaar where a screen shows Chinese President Xi Jinping in Hotan in western China's Xinjiang region. Human Rights Watch says it has found new evidence that authorities in one of China's most repressive regions are sweeping up citizens' personal information in a stark example of how modern big-data technology can be applied to policing, and potentially abused. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
February 27, 2018 - 5:57 am
BEIJING (AP) — Human Rights Watch says it has found new evidence that authorities in one of China's most repressive regions are sweeping up citizens' personal information in a stark example of how big-data technology can be used to police a population. The rights group used publicly available...
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FILE - In this Feb. 17, 2016 file photo an iPhone is seen in Washington. The government inspected a record number of international travelers' electronic devices in the last budget year. U.S. Customs and Border Protection announced Friday that it inspected 30,200 phones and other electronic devices in fiscal year 2017 _ a nearly 60 percent spike from 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
January 05, 2018 - 5:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The government inspected a record number of international travelers' electronic devices last year, expanding a practice that has drawn alarm from privacy advocates. U.S. Customs and Border Protection announced Friday that its border agents inspected 30,200 phones and other...
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Heather Gooze, Las Vegas shooting witness, cries as she testifies during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2017, entitled: "Firearm Accessory Regulation and Enforcing Federal and State Reporting to the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS)." (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
December 06, 2017 - 1:50 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on legislation intended to make it easier for gun owners to legally carry concealed weapons across state lines (all times local): 1:20 p.m. A Maryland police chief is calling on Congress to pass legislation that prohibits the use of devices that allow semi-automatic...
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November 28, 2017 - 3:23 pm
A 21-year-old woman told authorities in Pennsylvania she was afraid her ex-boyfriend might harm her in the weeks before he apparently killed her and her mother. Court records obtained Tuesday show that Victoria Schultz talked to police and testified about her concerns after she found a tracking...
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