Law enforcement agencies

FILE - In this April 3, 2019, file photo, Casey Viner, an Ohio gamer accused of recruiting a prankster to make a bogus emergency call, leaves federal court in Wichita, Kansas, after changing his plea to guilty for his alleged part in the hoax that got an unarmed Kansas man killed by police. (AP Photo/Roxana Hegeman, File)
September 13, 2019 - 9:30 pm
WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — An Ohio gamer upset about a $1.50 bet while playing Call of Duty: WWII online was sentenced Friday to 15 months in prison for recruiting a prankster to make a bogus emergency call that resulted in the fatal shooting of a Kansas man by police. Casey Viner, 19, of North College...
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Pro-China protesters wave a Chinese national flag at a shopping mall in Hong Kong, Friday, Sept. 13, 2019. Protest-related activities are expected to continue Friday, when Chinese celebrate the Mid-Autumn Festival with lanterns and mooncakes. Police banned a planned major march in central Hong Kong on Sunday, but many protesters have said they will turn up anyway. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
September 13, 2019 - 8:19 am
HONG KONG (AP) — A tennis tournament and a London musical are the latest events postponed in Hong Kong out of concerns over safety and disruptions from pro-democracy protests. K-pop concerts, Chanel fashion shows and international conferences have been canceled, postponed or moved out of the semi-...
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FILE - In this June 7, 2017, file photo, then-acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe appears before a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing about the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, on Capitol Hill in Washington. McCabe faces the prospect of an indictment after his attorneys were unable to persuade senior Justice Department officials not to pursue charges. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
AP Newsroom
September 12, 2019 - 2:54 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, a frequent target of President Donald Trump's wrath, faces the prospect of an indictment after his attorneys were unable to persuade senior Justice Department officials not to pursue charges. Two people familiar with the matter said...
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Government contractors erect a section of Pentagon-funded border wall along the Colorado River, Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2019 in Yuma, Ariz. The 30-foot high wall replaces a five-mile section of Normandy barrier and post-n-beam fencing, shown at left, along the the International border that separates Mexico and the United States. Construction began as federal officials revealed a list of Defense Department projects to be cut to pay for President Donald Trump's wall. (AP Photo/Matt York)
AP Newsroom
September 12, 2019 - 4:31 am
YUMA, Ariz. (AP) — On a dirt road past rows of date trees, just feet from a dry section of Colorado River, a small construction crew is putting up a towering border wall that the government hopes will reduce — for good — the flow of immigrants who cross the U.S.-Mexico border illegally. Cicadas...
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This undated photo provided by Anthony Darst shows Brian Quinones. Quinones, 30, was fatally shot by police in suburban Minneapolis on Saturday, Sept. 7, 2019, after a police chase that Quinones livestreamed on Facebook. Police say Quinones confronted officers with a knife before he was shot. (Anthony Darst via AP)
September 09, 2019 - 8:50 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The livestreamed video of the final minutes of Brian Quinones' life before he was fatally shot by police show him calmly driving a car and listening to music, running at least one red light as he leads officers on a chase through two Minneapolis suburbs. At one point, the video...
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September 08, 2019 - 12:19 pm
RICHFIELD, Minn. (AP) — Police near Minneapolis shot and killed a driver following a chase after he apparently emerged from his car holding a knife and refused their commands to drop it. The chase started late Saturday night in Edina and ended in Richfield with officers shooting the man, Brian J...
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September 06, 2019 - 8:37 am
SHARONVILLE, Ohio (AP) — A man confused about Ohio drug laws has called a police department demanding that officers return the small amount of marijuana they "stole" from him. WXIX-TV reports the man told a Sharonville police dispatcher in an expletive-laced call Tuesday that it's legal to possess...
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Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam, pauses during a press conference at the government building in Hong Kong, on Thursday, Sept. 5, 2019. Lam says the extradition bill that sparked months of demonstrations will be formally withdrawn in the legislative council without the need for debate or vote. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)
September 05, 2019 - 8:41 pm
HONG KONG (AP) — Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam said Thursday that the decision to withdraw an extradition bill that sparked months of demonstrations in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory was her government's own initiative to break the impasse, and not Beijing's directive. Lam told a news...
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FILE - In this March 26, 2019, file photo, actor Jussie Smollett smiles and waves to supporters before leaving Cook County Court after his charges were dropped in Chicago. Smollett's attorneys have filed a motion this week arguing that the actor should not have to pay the city of Chicago $130,000 for the police investigation into what he claimed was a racist and homophobic attack in January, because he had no way of knowing how much time and money the department would spend on the probe. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty, File)
September 04, 2019 - 12:39 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Jussie Smollett's attorneys have filed a motion arguing that the actor should not have to pay Chicago $130,000 for a police investigation into what he claimed was a racist and homophobic attack, because he couldn't have known how much time and money the department would spend looking...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, March 28, 2012 file photo, a surveillance camera is seen by the Olympic Stadium at the Olympic Park in London. A British court has ruled that a police force’s trial of automated facial recognition technology is lawful, dealing a blow to activists concerned about its implications for privacy. The court said Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019 that existing laws adequately cover the trial by the South Wales police force, in what’s believed to be the world’s first legal case on how a law enforcement agency uses the new technology. (AP Photo/Sang Tan, file)
September 04, 2019 - 8:27 am
LONDON (AP) — A British court has ruled that a police force's trial of automated facial recognition technology is lawful, dealing a blow to an activist concerned about its implications for privacy. The court said Wednesday that existing laws adequately cover the trial by the South Wales police...
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