Judiciary

File - In this May 14, 2019, file photo, Montana Gov. Steve Bullock, Democratic presidential candidate, officially announces his campaign for president at Helena High School in Helena, Mont. Gov. Bullock and New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal face a key test Wednesday, June 5, 2019, when a judge hears arguments in their lawsuit seeking to force the Trump administration to resume collecting information about donors to certain nonprofit groups. Bullock, who is running for the Democratic nomination for president, has made campaign-finance disclosure a signature issue. (Thom Bridge/Independent Record via AP, File)
June 04, 2019 - 4:14 pm
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — An attempt by two states to force the Trump administration to resume collecting information about donors to certain nonprofit groups faces a key test Wednesday when a federal judge in Montana hears arguments about whether the states can challenge the IRS policy. Montana Gov...
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U.S. Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-NY, Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, speaks during a news conference, in New York, Wednesday, May 29, 2019. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)
June 04, 2019 - 11:37 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on congressional investigations and President Donald Trump (all times local): 11:35 a.m. The White House is again directing former employees not to cooperate with a congressional investigation, this time instructing former aides Hope Hicks and Annie Donaldson not to...
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FILE - In this Oct. 29, 2018, file photo, young plaintiffs stand on the steps of the United States District Courthouse during a rally in Eugene, Ore., to support a high-profile climate change lawsuit against the federal government. A lawsuit by a group of young Americans accusing the U.S. government of harming them by having fostered a fossil-fuels energy system faces a major hurdle Tuesday, June 4, 2019, when a federal appeals court hears oral arguments on whether the case should proceed. (Andy Nelson/The Register-Guard via AP, File)
June 04, 2019 - 2:13 am
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A lawsuit by a group of young people who say U.S. energy policies are causing climate change and hurting their future faces a major hurdle Tuesday as lawyers for the Trump administration argue to stop the case from moving forward. Three judges from the 9th U.S. Circuit Court...
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Carnival Corp. President Arnold Donald, left, arrives at federal court, Monday, June 3, 2019, in Miami. Carnival Corp. is in federal court for a hearing on what to do about allegations that it has continued polluting the oceans from some of its cruise ships despite agreeing years ago to stop (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky)
June 03, 2019 - 6:24 pm
MIAMI (AP) — Carnival Corp. reached a settlement Monday with federal prosecutors in which the world's largest cruise line agreed to pay a $20 million penalty because its ships continued to pollute the oceans despite a previous criminal conviction aimed at curbing similar conduct. Senior U.S...
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FILE - In this May 3, 2019, file photo, South Africa's Caster Semenya crosses the line to win gold in the women's 800-meter final during the Diamond League in Doha, Qatar. Semenya's lawyers say the Swiss supreme court has ordered track's governing body to suspend its testosterone regulations. The lawyers say Monday's, June 3, 2019, ruling allows Semenya to compete unrestricted in all female events. (AP Photo/Kamran Jebreili, File)
June 03, 2019 - 5:12 pm
Caster Semenya won an interim ruling in her battle against the IAAF when the Swiss supreme court ordered athletics' governing body to suspend its testosterone regulations on Monday, raising the prospect of her competing at the world championships without having to take hormone suppressing...
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June 03, 2019 - 1:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A dispute involving the pirate Blackbeard's ship is on deck for the Supreme Court's next term. The justices said Monday they will hear a copyright dispute involving video and a photograph of the Queen Anne's Revenge. The ship was discovered off North Carolina in 1996. The case the...
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In this April 11 2019 file photo, Lawyer Juan Branco who co-authored a legal document alleging crimes against humanity by the European Union as he speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Paris, France. Human rights lawyers are accusing the European Union of committing crimes against humanity in its treatment of migrants who hope to cross the Mediterranean Sea from Libya. (AP Photo/Michel Euler, File)
June 03, 2019 - 12:11 pm
PARIS (AP) — More than 40,000 people have been intercepted in the Mediterranean and taken to detention camps and torture houses under a European migration policy that is responsible for crimes against humanity, according to a legal document asking the International Criminal Court to take the case...
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June 03, 2019 - 10:09 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is declining to get involved in a dispute that began when a group tried to have Washington transit officials display an ad with a provocative cartoon of the Prophet Muhammad. The justices said Monday they would not get involved in the case. The Texas-based...
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FILE - In this Aug. 24, 2016 file photo, burn victim Anthony Gooden gets help with his injured hand during a break in the trial for Martin Blackwell in Atlanta. Blackwell, who was convicted of throwing scalding water on a Gooden and his boyfriend while they slept, told one of them to “get out of my house with all that gay,” a victim testified, but he couldn’t be charged with a hate crime because the state has no such law. Georgia is one of only four states - along with South Carolina, Wyoming and Arkansas - without an official hate crimes law. (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)
June 02, 2019 - 9:48 am
ATLANTA (AP) — A Georgia man convicted of throwing scalding water on a sleeping same-sex couple told one of them to "get out of my house with all that gay," a victim testified, yet he couldn't be charged with a hate crime because the state has no such law. Victim Anthony Gooden said in a recent...
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FILE - This Thursday, May 16, 2019, file booking photo provided by the Alexandria Sheriff's Office, in Virginia, shows Chelsea Manning. Lawyers for former Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning are renewing efforts to get her released from a northern Virginia jail. Manning’s lawyers filed court papers Friday, May 31, 2019 asking a federal judge to reconsider his decision to send Manning to the Alexandria jail for refusing to testify to a grand jury investigating WikiLeaks. (Alexandria Sheriff's Office via AP, File)
May 31, 2019 - 3:14 pm
ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) — Lawyers for former Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning are renewing efforts to get her released from a northern Virginia jail. Manning's lawyers filed court papers Friday asking a federal judge to reconsider his decision to send Manning to the Alexandria jail for...
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