Heart health

This undated photo provided by Amarin in November 2018 shows a capsule of the purified, prescription fish oil Vascepa. On Friday, Dec. 13, 2019, U.S. regulators approved expanded use of the medication for preventing serious heart complications in high-risk patients already taking cholesterol-lowering pills. (Amarin via AP)
December 13, 2019 - 5:53 pm
TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — U.S. regulators on Friday approved expanded use of a fish oil-based drug for preventing serious heart complications in high-risk patients already taking cholesterol-lowering pills. Vascepa was approved years ago for people with sky-high triglycerides, a type of fat in blood...
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FILE - This May 26, 2009 file photo shows a printout from an electrocardiogram machine in Missouri. Doctors are reporting that novel drugs may offer fresh ways to reduce heart risks beyond the usual medicines to lower cholesterol and blood pressure. One new study found that heart attack survivors benefited from a medicine long used to treat gout. Gene-targeting medicines also showed promise in studies discussed Monday, Nov. 18, 2019, at an American Heart Association conference in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)
November 18, 2019 - 3:26 pm
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Novel drugs may offer fresh ways to reduce heart risks beyond the usual medicines to lower cholesterol and blood pressure. One new study found that heart attack survivors benefited from a medicine long used to treat gout. Several experimental drugs also showed early promise for...
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In this Feb. 16, 2017 file photo, surgeons perform a non-emergency angioplasty at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. Through a blood vessel in the groin, a tube is guided to a blockage in the heart. A tiny balloon is then inflated to flatten the clog, and a mesh tube called a stent is inserted to prop the artery open. According to a federally funded study released on Saturday, Nov. 16, 2019, people with severe but stable heart disease from clogged arteries may have less chest pain if they get a procedure to improve blood flow rather than just giving medicines a chance to help, but it won't cut their risk of having a heart attack or dying over the following few years. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)
November 16, 2019 - 2:01 pm
PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A large study finds that people with severe but stable heart disease from clogged arteries may have less chest pain if they get a procedure to improve blood flow rather than just giving medicines a chance to help, but it won't cut their risk of having a heart attack or dying...
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FILE - This June 14, 2011, file photo, shows the pills of the drug Lipitor in Willingboro, N.J. Researchers examined records of people taking cholesterol-lowering medicine between 2005 and 2016, a few years after a big change in treatment guidelines. They found encouraging drops, suggesting the change may be paying off. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)
November 11, 2019 - 2:00 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Here's some good health news: Cholesterol levels are dropping in the U.S. Researchers examined records of people taking cholesterol-lowering medicine between 2005 and 2016, a few years after a big change in treatment guidelines. They found encouraging declines, suggesting the...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Dec. 26, 2018 file photo, a pedestrian is silhouetted against wet pavement in Kansas City, Mo. In a first-of-its-kind report released Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that millions of cases of heart disease and other illnesses can be linked to abuse and other physical and psychological harm that patients suffered as children. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
November 05, 2019 - 8:12 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. health officials estimate that millions of cases of heart disease and other illnesses are linked to abuse and other physical and psychological harm suffered early in life. In a report released Tuesday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tried to estimate the impact...
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In this Thursday, July 25, 2019 photo, workers at the Electric Time Company in Medfield, Mass., test a 20 foot high clock, built for the a new train station in Bangkok, Thailand, prior to packing and shipment. The clock features a "9" in Thai number script. Daylight saving time ends at 2 a.m. local time Sunday, Nov. 3, 2019, when clocks are set back one hour. Losing an hour of daylight sounds like a gloomy preview for the dark winter months, and at least one study found an increase in people seeking help for depression after turning the clocks back to standard time in November _ in Scandinavia. But far more research says that the springtime start of daylight saving time may be more harmful, linking it with more car accidents, heart attacks in vulnerable people and other health problems that may persist throughout the time change. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
October 31, 2019 - 2:24 pm
Office workers bemoan driving home in the dark. Night owls relish the chance to sleep in. As clocks tick toward the end of daylight saving time, many sleep scientists and circadian biologists are pushing for a permanent ban because of potential ill effects on human health. Losing an hour of...
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This combination of undated photos provided by the family in October 2019 shows Faith Newsome before and after gastric bypass surgery. At 5 feet, 8 inches and 273 pounds, her BMI was almost 42 and she had high blood pressure and prediabetes when she had the procedure at age 16. After about a year, she’d shed 100 pounds and those health problems disappeared. She slimmed down enough to become active in sports, shop for prom dresses and gain a better self-image. But to avoid malnutrition she takes vitamins, must eat small meals and gets sick if she eats foods high in fat or sugar. (Family photos via AP)
October 27, 2019 - 11:38 am
Even some severely obese preteens should be considered for weight loss surgery, according to new recommendations. The guidance issued Sunday by the American Academy of Pediatrics is based on a review of medical evidence, including several studies showing that surgery in teens can result in marked...
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FILE - In this Oct. 11, 2019, file image taken with a slow shutter speed a soccer player runs for the ball during the Euro 2020 group A qualifying soccer match in Prague, Czech Republic. A study, from the University of Glasgow and reported Monday, Oct. 21, in New England Journal of Medicine, of former professional soccer players in Scotland found that they were less likely to die of common causes such as heart disease and cancer compared with the general population but more likely to die from dementia. (AP Photo/Petr David Josek, File)
AP Newsroom
October 21, 2019 - 12:53 pm
LONDON (AP) — A study of former professional soccer players in Scotland finds that they were less likely to die of common causes such as heart disease and cancer compared with the general population but more likely to die from dementia. The results raise fresh concerns about head-related risks from...
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In this image taken from video, Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks we reporters outside his home, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019, in Burlington, Vt. His wife, Jane O'Meara Sanders listens at right. Sanders says he was "dumb" not to have listened to the symptoms he was experiencing before he was stricken with a heart attack last week. (AP Photo/Wilson Ring)
October 10, 2019 - 8:21 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Bernie Sanders said Thursday that he never considered dropping out of the presidential race after suffering a heart attack last week and characterized his recovery as "so far, so very good" despite acknowledging that the incident left his heart "with some damage." In an interview...
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In this image taken from video, Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks we reporters outside his home, Tuesday, Oct. 8, 2019, in Burlington, Vt. His wife, Jane O'Meara Sanders listens at right. Sanders says he was "dumb" not to have listened to the symptoms he was experiencing before he was stricken with a heart attack last week. (AP Photo/Wilson Ring)
October 09, 2019 - 7:07 pm
BURLINGTON, Vt. (AP) — Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders said Wednesday that he "misspoke" when he told reporters he may slow his frenetic campaigning pace after a recent heart attack. The Vermont senator backtracked in an interview with NBC News just a day after indicating that...
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