Health care reform

FILE - In this Jan. 20, 2021, file photo President Joe Biden waits to sign his first executive order in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. As one of his first acts, Biden offered a sweeping immigration overhaul that would provide a path to U.S. citizenship for the estimated 11 million people who are in the United States illegally. It would also codify provisions wiping out some of President Donald Trump's signature hard-line policies, including trying to end existing, protected legal status for many immigrants brought to the U.S. as children and crackdowns on asylum rules. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
January 24, 2021 - 7:37 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is confronting the political risk that comes with grand ambition. As one of his first acts, Biden offered a sweeping immigration overhaul last week that would provide a path to U.S. citizenship for the estimated 11 million people who are in the United States...
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Vietnam veteran and Purple Heart recipient Alford Washington, Sr., receives a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine from nurse Alanna Williams at the Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System's gymnasium in New Orleans, Thursday, Dec. 24, 2020. Washington was part of the Pathfinder Unit in Vietnam where he survived a plane crash that killed 7 people in Oct. 28, 1967. He said he had no concerns receiving the COVID-19 vaccine. (Sophia Germer/The Times-Picayune/The New Orleans Advocate via AP)
December 27, 2020 - 11:53 pm
The massive, year-end catchall bill that President Donald Trump signed into law combines $900 billion in COVID-19 aid with a $1.4 trillion omnibus spending bill and reams of other unfinished legislation on taxes, energy, education and health care. Highlights of the measure with overall funding...
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Michelle Chester, director of employee health services at Northwell Health, right, shows the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine to Arlene Ramirez, director of patient care at Long Island Jewish Valley Stream hospital, before administering the vaccine to her on Monday, Dec. 21, 2020, in Valley Stream, N.Y. (Eduardo Munoz/Pool via AP)
December 22, 2020 - 12:52 am
The massive, year-end catchall bill Congress passed combines $900 billion in COVID-19 aid with a $1.4 trillion omnibus spending bill and reams of other unfinished legislation on taxes, energy, education and health care. It awaits President Donald Trump's signature. Highlights of the measure with...
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Boxes containing the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine are moved to the loading dock for shipping at the McKesson distribution center in Olive Branch, Miss., Sunday, Dec. 20, 2020. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, Pool)
December 21, 2020 - 10:05 am
Congressional leaders have hashed out a massive, year-end catchall bill that combines $900 billion in COVID-19 aid with a $1.4 trillion omnibus spending bill and reams of other unfinished legislation on taxes, energy, education and health care. The huge, still-unreleased bill is slated for votes on...
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Boxes containing the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine are moved to the loading dock for shipping at the McKesson distribution center in Olive Branch, Miss., Sunday, Dec. 20, 2020. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, Pool)
December 21, 2020 - 12:34 am
Congressional leaders have hashed out a massive, year-end catchall bill that combines $900 billion in COVID-19 aid with a $1.4 trillion omnibus spending bill and reams of other unfinished legislation on taxes, energy, education and health care. The huge, still-unreleased bill is slated for votes on...
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President-elect Joe Biden speaks at a drive-in rally for Georgia Democratic candidates for U.S. Senate Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2020, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
December 15, 2020 - 6:38 pm
ATLANTA (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden told Georgia voters on Tuesday they must deliver two Democratic Senate runoffs victories in January so his administration can forcefully confront the coronavirus pandemic and other national challenges. Fresh off the Electoral College affirming his victory,...
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FILE - In this July 10, 2018, file photo bottles of medicine ride on a belt at a mail-in pharmacy warehouse in Florence, N.J. President-elect Joe Biden is unlikely to get sweeping health care changes through a closely divided Congress, but there’s a menu of narrower actions he can choose from to make a tangible difference in affordability and coverage for millions of people. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)
November 13, 2020 - 5:54 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden is unlikely to get sweeping health care changes through a closely divided Congress, but there’s a menu of narrower actions he can choose from to make a tangible difference on affordability and coverage for millions of people. With the balance of power in...
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U.S. Rep. Markwayne Mullin, R-Okla., speaks at a campaign rally, Friday, Oct. 30, 2020, in Flagstaff, Ariz. Until recently, Congress hasn't had many Native American members but hope is growing as the Native delegation in the U.S. House increased by two on Election Day along with four Native Americans who won reelection including Mullin who is Cherokee.(AP Photo/Matt York)
November 10, 2020 - 1:02 am
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Internet access, health care and basic necessities like running water and electricity within Indigenous communities have long been at the center of congressional debates. But until recently, Congress didn't have many Indigenous members who were pushing for solutions and...
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Katherine Rutigliano comforts her son at their home in Phoenix, Ariz., on March 15, 2020. When she and her husband moved away from San Francisco in 2013, they figured they would never meet a fellow Democrat again. Rutgliano didn't realize it, but she had moved her family to what is now the front lines in American politics. (AP Photo/Dario Lopez-Mills)
October 06, 2020 - 12:31 am
PHOENIX (AP) — When Katherine Rutigliano and her husband moved away from San Francisco in 2013, they figured they would never meet a fellow Democrat again. But housing was affordable around Phoenix. No more cramped condo. No more suffocating mortgage payments. No more tech-boom exhaustion...
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Tom Alexander holds a cross as he prays prior to rulings outside the Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, July 8, 2020. The Supreme Court is siding with two Catholic schools in a ruling that underscores that certain employees of religious schools, hospitals and social service centers can’t sue for employment discrimination.(AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
July 08, 2020 - 11:28 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled broadly Wednesday in favor of the religious rights of employers in two cases that could leave more than 70,000 women without free contraception and tens of thousands of people with no way to sue for job discrimination. In both cases the court ruled 7-2,...
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