Hate groups

A 100-foot monument to former U.S. vice president and slavery advocate John C. Calhoun towers over a downtown square Tuesday, June 23, 2020, in Charleston, S.C. Officials in Charleston voted unanimously Tuesday to remove the statue from a downtown square, the latest in a wave of actions arising from protests against racism and police brutality against African Americans. (AP Photo/Meg Kinnard)
June 23, 2020 - 11:48 pm
CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — Officials in the historic South Carolina city of Charleston voted unanimously Tuesday to remove a statue of former vice president and slavery advocate John C. Calhoun from a downtown square, the latest in a wave of actions arising from protests against racism and police...
Read More
People film the only statue of a Confederate general, Albert Pike, in the nation's capital after it was toppled by protesters and set on fire in Washington early Saturday, June 20, 2020. It comes on Juneteenth, the day marking the end of slavery in the United States, amid continuing anti-racism demonstrations following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.(AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo)
June 20, 2020 - 6:38 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Protesters tore down more statues across the United States, expanding the razing in a San Francisco park to the writer of America’s national anthem and the general who won the country’s Civil War that ended widespread slavery. In Seattle, pre-dawn violence erupted Saturday in a...
Read More
President Donald Trump looks at his phone during a roundtable with governors on the reopening of America's small businesses, in the State Dining Room of the White House, Thursday, June 18, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
June 18, 2020 - 10:32 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook has removed campaign ads by President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence that featured an upside-down red triangle, a symbol once used by Nazis to designate political prisoners, communists and others in concentration camps. The company said in a statement Thursday...
Read More
Freeman Culver stands in front of a mural listing the names of businesses destroyed during the Tulsa race massacre in Tulsa, Okla., Monday, June 15, 2020, on the other side of what's historically the city's white-black dividing line from where President Donald Trump will rally Saturday. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
June 18, 2020 - 7:53 pm
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — For decades, when it was discussed at all, the killing of hundreds of people in a prosperous black business district nearly a century ago was referred to as the Tulsa race riot. Under new standards developed by teachers, Oklahoma students are urged to consider the differences...
Read More
A tablet offers the recent history of the Stapleton neighborhood at the intersection of 29th Avenue and Roslyn Street, Wednesday, June 17, 2020, in northeast Denver. Amid nationwide racial unrest, residents will vote on whether to continue to be named after Benjamin Stapleton, a five-term mayor of Denver who was a member of the Ku Klux Klan. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
June 17, 2020 - 8:02 pm
DENVER (AP) — A Denver neighborhood voted Wednesday to recommend changing its name after a yearslong debate over its association with a former mayor with ties to the Ku Klux Klan. The 11 elected neighborhood delegates of the Stapleton Master Community Association voted unanimously in favor of the...
Read More
June 17, 2020 - 12:23 pm
Several civil rights and other advocacy groups are calling on large advertisers to stop Facebook ad campaigns during July because they say the social network isn't doing enough to curtail racist and violent content on its platform. The groups in the “#StopHateforProfit" campaign, launched Wednesday...
Read More
Donald Shaw looks at a sculpture in the John Hope Franklin reconciliation park in Tulsa, Okla., Monday, June 15, 2020, a few hundred yards and on the other side of what's historically the city's white-black dividing line, where President Donald Trump will rally Saturday, June 20. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
June 16, 2020 - 11:56 pm
TULSA, Okla. (AP) — In the real world, 74-year-old Donald Shaw is walking on the empty, parched grass slope by Tulsa’s noisy crosstown expressway. He's on the other side of the city’s historical white-black dividing line from where President Donald Trump will hold a rally Saturday with his...
Read More
Donald Shaw looks at a sculpture in the John Hope Franklin reconciliation park in Tulsa, Okla., Monday, June 15, 2020, a few hundred yards and on the other side of what's historically the city's white-black dividing line, where President Donald Trump will rally Saturday, June 20. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
June 16, 2020 - 2:25 pm
TULSA, Okla. (AP) — In the real world, 74-year-old Donald Shaw is walking on the empty, parched grass slope by Tulsa’s noisy crosstown expressway. He's on the other side of the city’s historical white-black dividing line from where President Donald Trump will hold a rally Saturday with his...
Read More
Defendant Stephan Ernst, right, who is accused of murdering politician Walter Luebcke he arrives for the first day of his trial at the Oberlandgericht Frankfurt courthouse, in Frankfurt, Germany, Tuesday, June 16, 2020. A German court will begin hearing the case against two far-right extremists accused of killing the regional politician Walter Luebcke of Merkel's Christian Democratic Union party. The execution-style slaying of Walter Luebcke shocked the country last year. Stephan Ernst a 46-year-old with previous convictions for violent anti-migrant crimes, will appear in the Frankfurt regional court accused of murder, attempted murder, serious bodily harm and firearms offenses. A second man, identified only as Markus H. due to privacy rules, is charged with accessory to murder and breaking firearms laws. (Thomas Lohnes/Pool via AP)
June 16, 2020 - 7:22 am
BERLIN (AP) — A German court begin hearing the case Tuesday against two far-right extremists accused of killing a regional politician whose execution-style slaying shocked the country last year. Walter Luebcke, a member of Chancellor Angela Merkel’s party who led the regional administration in the...
Read More
This Nov. 5, 2009 file photo shows the entrance to Fort Hood Army Base in Fort Hood, Texas, near Killeen, Texas. As much as President Donald Trump enjoys talking about winning and winners, the Confederate generals he vows will not have their names removed from U.S. military bases were not only on the losing side of rebellion against the United States, some weren't even considered good generals. Or even good men. The 10 generals include some who made costly battlefield blunders; others mistreated captured Union soldiers, some were slaveholders, and one was linked to the Ku Klux Klan after the war. (AP Photo/Jack Plunkett, File)
June 14, 2020 - 8:53 am
CINCINNATI (AP) — As much as President Donald Trump enjoys talking about winning and winners, the Confederate generals he vows will not have their names removed from U.S. military bases were not only on the losing side of rebellion against the United States, some weren’t even considered good...
Read More

Pages