Freshwater pollution

In this photo taken Thursday, March 28, 2019, Anne Vierra,with the town of Paradise, takes payment for the first building permit since the Camp Fire as Jason and Meagann Buzzard plan to rebuild their home in Paradise, Calif. Small signs of rebuilding a Northern California town destroyed by wildfire are sprouting this spring, including the issuing of the first permit to rebuild one of the 11,000 homes destroyed in Paradise five months ago. A city hall clerk on Thursday issued the couple a building permit to replace their home destroyed by the Nov. 8 fire that killed 85 people. The couple told reporters they never thought about leaving. Paradise Mayor Jody Jones said the Buzzards' permit is a sign that the town will rebuild.(Hector Amezcua/The Sacramento Bee via AP)
March 29, 2019 - 3:42 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Small signs of rebuilding the California town of Paradise after it was destroyed by wildfire are sprouting this spring, including the issuing of the first permits to rebuild two the 11,000 homes destroyed five months ago. The city issued the first permit Thursday to Jason and...
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FILE - This Sept. 21, 2017, file photo shows the Environmental Protection Agency building in Washington. Flooding in the Midwest temporarily cut off a Superfund site in Nebraska that stores radioactive waste and explosives, inundated another one storing toxic chemical waste in Missouri, and limited access to others, the EPA said Wednesday, March 27, 2019. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
March 27, 2019 - 9:55 pm
MEAD, Neb. (AP) — Flooding in the Midwest temporarily cut off a Superfund site in Nebraska that stores radioactive waste and explosives, inundated another one storing toxic chemical waste in Missouri, and limited access to others, federal regulators said Wednesday. The Environmental Protection...
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March 25, 2019 - 3:02 pm
RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — In a story March 23 about the aftermath of a Brazilian dam collapse, The Associated Press reported erroneously that a new evacuation had been ordered for people near a dam. They had been evacuated in February. A corrected version of the story is below: Brazilian miner Vale...
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In this March 12, 2019 satellite photo provided by NOAA, shows the Great Lakes in various degrees of snow and ice. A scientific report says the Great Lakes region is warming faster than the rest of the U.S., which likely will bring more flooding and other extreme weather events such as heat waves and drought. The warming climate also could mean less overall snowfall even as lake-effect snowstorms get bigger. The report by researchers from universities primarily from the Midwest says agriculture could be hit especially hard, with later spring planting and summer dry spells. (NOAA via AP)
March 21, 2019 - 5:46 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The Great Lakes region is warming faster than the rest of the U.S., a trend likely to bring more extreme storms while also degrading water quality, worsening erosion and posing tougher challenges for farming, scientists reported Thursday. The annual mean air temperature...
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FILE - In this June 25, 1952 file photo, a fire tug fights flames on the Cuyahoga River near downtown Cleveland. Federal environmental regulators say fish living in the northeastern Ohio river are now safe to eat. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga River was lauded by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine as progress achieved by investing in water quality.(The Plain Dealer via AP)
March 19, 2019 - 1:59 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Fish in the Cuyahoga River, which became synonymous with pollution when it caught fire in Cleveland in 1969, are now safe to eat, federal environmental regulators say. The easing of fish consumption restrictions on the Cuyahoga was lauded Monday by Republican Gov. Mike DeWine...
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An island of solar panels floats in a pond at the Los Bronces mining plant, about 65 kilometers (approximately 40 miles) from Santiago, Chile, Thursday, March 14, 2019. The island of solar panels could give purpose to mine refuse in Chile by using them to generate clean energy and reduce water evaporation.(AP Photo / Esteban Felix)
March 16, 2019 - 2:17 pm
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — In a story March 15 about a floating island of solar panels in Chile, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the array is 1,200 square feet. The array is 1,200 square meters. A corrected version of the story is below: SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — A floating island of solar...
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March 05, 2019 - 7:17 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico on Tuesday sued the U.S. Air Force over groundwater contamination at two bases, saying the federal government has a responsibility to clean up plumes of toxic chemicals left behind by past military firefighting activities. The contamination — linked to a class of...
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In this image from video provided the Environmental Protection Agency, Associated Press reporter Ellen Knickmeyer, in white, being pushed by a security guard out of EPA headquarters on May 22, 2018, in Washington. Newly released security camera footage discredits Trump administration claims that Knickmeyer tried to force her way into EPA headquarters to cover a summit on drinking water contaminants. Video obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request shows a security guard grab Knickmeyer by the shoulders and shove her out of the agency’s lobby. (EPA via AP)
February 26, 2019 - 4:46 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Security camera footage released Tuesday undermines Trump administration claims that a reporter for The Associated Press tried to force her way into the Environmental Protection Agency headquarters to cover a summit last year on drinking water contaminants. Video obtained through...
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February 19, 2019 - 3:25 pm
A Minnesota environmental group filed a federal lawsuit against the Environmental Protection Agency Tuesday, seeking to force it to make public the concerns its specialists have expressed about a copper-nickel mine in the northeast of the state. Environmentalists worry PolyMet Mining's planned $1...
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Acting Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler speaks during a news conference in Philadelphia, Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019. Under strong pressure from Congress, the Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday that it will move ahead this year with a process that could lead to setting a safety threshold for a group of highly toxic chemicals in drinking water. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
February 14, 2019 - 3:26 pm
Under pressure from Congress, the Environmental Protection Agency said Thursday it would move toward setting safety limits for a class of highly toxic chemicals contaminating drinking water around the country. Environmentalists, congressional Democrats and state officials countered that the agency...
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