Financial industry regulation

President Donald Trump and Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price arrive on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, to rally support for the Republican health care overhaul. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
March 22, 2017 - 9:57 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and House leaders revved up pressure Wednesday on balky conservatives and other Republican lawmakers as crunch time approaches on the party's health care overhaul bill, a drive GOP leaders concede they can't afford to lose. A day before the House planned...
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Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
March 22, 2017 - 3:43 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers questioning Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch at his Senate confirmation are asking about something called "Chevron deference." For the record, it is not about letting someone ahead of you in line at the gas station. But it is a legal concept Gorsuch has addressed as a...
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Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, joined by, from left, Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash., chair of the Republican Conference, Rep. Phil Roe, R-Tenn., and Rep. Pat Tiberi, R-Ohio, speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, March, 17, 2017, as House Republicans push for unity in advancing the GOP's "Obamacare" replacement bill. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
March 17, 2017 - 11:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump agreed to add fresh Medicaid curbs to the House Republican health care bill Friday, bolstering the measure with support from some conservative lawmakers but leaving its prospects wobbly. House leaders discussed other amendments calibrated to round up votes...
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Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, joined by, from left, Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, R-Wash., chair of the Republican Conference, Rep. Phil Roe, R-Tenn., and Rep. Pat Tiberi, R-Ohio, speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, March, 17, 2017, as House Republicans push for unity in advancing the GOP's "Obamacare" replacement bill. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
March 17, 2017 - 11:45 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House and some House conservatives agreed Friday to make changes in the troubled Republican health care bill in hopes of easing deep party divisions over the overhaul plan. But other conservatives expressed continued opposition and it remained uncertain that party...
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House Budget Committee Chair Diane Black, R-Tenn., right, joined at left by Rep. Todd Rokita, R-Ind., and panel staff member Jim Bates, center, works on the Republican health care bill, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, March, 16, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
March 17, 2017 - 3:57 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Pulling in different directions, Republicans are striving to get traction for a health care overhaul in danger of being dragged down by intra-party differences. Some GOP governors weighed in Thursday evening in a letter to congressional leaders saying the House bill gives them...
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Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa., left, and Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., arrive at the Senate chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March, 15, 2017, for a vote to confirm former Indiana Sen. Dan Coats as director of national intelligence. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
March 15, 2017 - 11:55 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The government says more than 12 million people have signed up for coverage this year under former President Barack Obama's health care law, even as the Republican-led Congress debates its repeal. The official national figure of 12.2 million does not include an additional 765,000...
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FILE - In this April 1, 2011 file photo, Keith Hall testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Congressional Budget Office is a scorekeeper suddenly in the spotlight. The obscure but respected agency, established under the 1974 budget act, provides cost estimates of legislation, baseline projections of the federal budget and its components, and independent economic and deficit statistics for lawmakers. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
March 14, 2017 - 4:02 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Congressional Budget Office is a scorekeeper suddenly in the spotlight. Monday's estimate of the House GOP's health care measure gave ammunition to Democratic critics of the law, predicting that 14 million people would lose insurance next year. Republicans had been bracing for...
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FILE - In this March 9, 2017 file photo, House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis. uses charts and graphs to make his case for the GOP's long-awaited plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Republicans pushing a plan to dismantle Barack Obama's health care law are bracing for a Congressional Budget Office analysis widely expected to conclude that fewer Americans will have health coverage under the proposal, despite President Donald Trump's promise of "insurance for everybody." (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
March 14, 2017 - 3:50 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Critics of GOP health care legislation got fresh ammunition from a report that estimates the bill would increase the ranks of the uninsured by 14 million people next year alone, and 24 million over a decade. The findings from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office could make...
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FILE - In this April 1, 2011 file photo, Keith Hall testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Congressional Budget Office is a scorekeeper suddenly in the spotlight. The obscure but respected agency, established under the 1974 budget act, provides cost estimates of legislation, baseline projections of the federal budget and its components, and independent economic and deficit statistics for lawmakers. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
March 13, 2017 - 5:47 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Congressional Budget Office is a scorekeeper suddenly in the spotlight. Monday's estimate of the House GOP's health care measure gave ammunition to Democratic critics of the law, predicting that 14 million people would lose insurance next year. Republicans had been bracing for...
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President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with his Cabinet in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, Monday, March 13, 2017. Clockwise, from lower left are, Veterans Affairs Secretary David Shulkin, Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson, Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, Vice President Mike Pence, Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Energy Secretary Rick Perry, UN Ambassador Nikki Haley, Budget Director Mick Mulvaney, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, the president, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao and Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
March 13, 2017 - 5:07 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Fourteen million Americans would lose coverage next year under House Republican legislation remaking the nation's health care system, and that figure would grow to 24 million by 2026, Congress' nonpartisan budget analysts projected Monday. The figures dealt a blow to a GOP drive...
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