Financial industry regulation

In this April 25, 2018, photo, Gary Ramey, owner and founder of Honor Defense, a gunmaker in Gainesville, Ga., holds a part from one of the company's firearms. Ramey and others in the gun industry are finding corporate America distancing itself from gunmakers and gun dealers, discontinuing discounts or refusing business. (AP Photo/Lisa Marie Pane)
June 24, 2018 - 6:54 pm
GAINESVILLE, Ga. (AP) — With Gary Ramey's fledgling gun-making business taking off in retail stores, he decided to start offering one of his handguns for sale on his website. That didn't sit well with the company he used to process payments, and they informed him they were dropping his account...
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FILE - In March 14, 2018 file photo, Labor Secretary Alex Acosta speaks during a Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, & Transportation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Trump administration is preparing to announce a new insurance option for small firms and self-employed people that would cost less but could cover fewer benefits than current plans. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
June 19, 2018 - 12:32 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration Tuesday rolled out a health insurance option for small businesses and self-employed people that could lead to lower premiums but may also cover fewer benefits than current plans. Labor Secretary Alex Acosta said the new "association health plans" will...
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June 18, 2018 - 9:33 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is close to finalizing a health insurance option for small firms and self-employed people that would cost less but could cover fewer benefits than current plans, congressional officials and business groups said Monday. They spoke on condition of anonymity...
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June 15, 2018 - 3:53 am
BEIJING (AP) — China's former chief insurance regulator has pleaded guilty to taking bribes over 12 years in exchange for helping people obtain loans, promotions and other favors, a state news agency reported. Xiang Junbo was the highest-ranking figure in Chinese finance to be ensnared in an anti-...
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FILE - This May 21, 2018 image shows the main page of the healthcare.gov website in Washington. On Wednesday, June 13, 2018, two independent experts said that the Trump administration appears to be taking aim at provisions of the Affordable Care Act that protect people in employer plans, not just those consumers who buy a policy directly from an insurer. The new position was outlined a week earlier in a legal brief the Justice Department filed in a Texas case challenging the health law. (HealthCare.gov via AP)
June 14, 2018 - 1:02 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration's latest move against "Obamacare" could jeopardize legal protections on pre-existing medical conditions for millions of people with employer coverage, particularly workers in small businesses, say law and insurance experts. At issue is Attorney General...
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In this May 22, 2018, file photo, Clarke Tucker talks to supporters after winning the District 2 U.S. House Democratic primary at Cotham's in the City in Little Rock. Democrats typically aren’t embracing their most liberal options in House districts that’ll determine which party controls Congress after the November midterms, but candidates will test how liberal the party can go and still win among GOP-leaning voters. (Thomas Metthe/Arkansas Democrat-Gazette via AP)
June 11, 2018 - 3:13 pm
A single-payer health care advocate in South Texas. A gun restriction supporter in Dallas. Cheerleaders in Arkansas and Iowa for public option health care. Weeks into the primary season, with five more states voting Tuesday, Democrats' midterm class is shaping up to test what liberal messages the...
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June 11, 2018 - 11:12 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is siding with a man's children over his ex-wife in a dispute about who should get more than $180,000 in life insurance proceeds. The justices ruled on Monday in a case involving the breakup of Mark Sveen and Kaye Melin. When the Minnesota residents divorced in...
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FILE - In this April 25, 2018, file photo, Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Trump administration said in a court filing late Thursday that it will no longer defend key parts of the Affordable Care Act, including the requirement that people have health insurance and provisions that guarantee access to health insurance regardless of any medical conditions. Sessions said in a letter to Congress on June 7, that President Donald Trump, who campaigned on repealing the law and nearly did so his first year in office, approved the legal strategy. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
June 09, 2018 - 8:38 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration's decision to stop defending in court the Obama health law's popular protections for consumers with pre-existing conditions could prove risky for Republicans in the midterm elections — and nudge premiums even higher. The Justice Department said in a court...
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FILE - In this April 25, 2018, file photo, Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Trump administration said in a court filing late Thursday that it will no longer defend key parts of the Affordable Care Act, including the requirement that people have health insurance and provisions that guarantee access to health insurance regardless of any medical conditions. Sessions said in a letter to Congress on June 7, that President Donald Trump, who campaigned on repealing the law and nearly did so his first year in office, approved the legal strategy. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
June 08, 2018 - 3:08 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration says in a court filing that it will no longer defend key parts of the Affordable Care Act, including the requirement that people have health insurance and provisions that guarantee access to health insurance regardless of any medical conditions. The...
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FILE - In this April 25, 2018, file photo, Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Trump administration said in a court filing late Thursday that it will no longer defend key parts of the Affordable Care Act, including the requirement that people have health insurance and provisions that guarantee access to health insurance regardless of any medical conditions. Sessions said in a letter to Congress on June 7, that President Donald Trump, who campaigned on repealing the law and nearly did so his first year in office, approved the legal strategy. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
June 07, 2018 - 10:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration said in a court filing late Thursday that it will no longer defend key parts of the Affordable Care Act, including the requirement that people have health insurance and provisions that guarantee access to health insurance regardless of any medical...
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