Environmental science

November 01, 2017 - 12:54 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's nominee for NASA chief has been criticized for promoting political divisiveness and rejecting climate change science. He says he'll run the space agency on a consensus agenda driven by science. Democrats weren't convinced Wednesday, with some calling him...
Read More
FILE - In this June 2, 2017 file photo, Environmental Protection Agency administrator Scott Pruitt speaks in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. Pruitt says he will replace the panels that advise him on science and public health issues with new members holding more diverse views. He announced the changes on Oct. 31, saying many previously appointed to the boards were potentially biased because they had received federal grants. The panels advise EPA on a wide range of issues, including drinking water standards and clean air regulations. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
October 31, 2017 - 9:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the Environmental Protection Agency said Tuesday he intends to replace the outside experts that advise him on science and public health issues with new board members holding more diverse views. In announcing the changes, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt suggested many...
Read More
FILE - In this Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017 file photo, a patient suffering from dengue fever lies in a hospital bed in Peshawar, Pakistan. Cases of dengue fever _ a painful mosquito-borne spread disease _ have doubled every decade since 1990 with 58.4 million cases and 10,000 deaths in 2013. Dr. Howard Frumkin, a former environmental health director at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said climate change, which allows mosquitoes to live in more places and stay active longer with shorter freeze seasons, is part but not all of the reason. (AP Photo/Muhammad Sajjad)
October 30, 2017 - 8:10 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Global warming is hurting people's health a bit more than previously thought, but there's hope that the Earth — and populations — can heal if the planet kicks its coal habit, a group of doctors and other experts said. The poor and elderly are most threatened by worsening climate...
Read More
FILE--In this Oct. 16, 2017, file photo, Jenny Parks, CEO of the Los Alamos National Laboratories Foundation, criticizes a proposed overhaul of New Mexico's state science standards for public schools that would omit or delete references to global warming, evolution and the age of the Earth, at a public hearing in Santa Fe, N.M. Public education officials in New Mexico have retreated from proposed science standards that would have deleted or omitted references to evolution, human contributions to global warming and Earth's age. (AP Photo/Morgan Lee, file)
October 27, 2017 - 4:13 pm
SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Public education officials in New Mexico have retreated from proposed science standards that would have deleted or omitted references to evolution, human contributions to global warming and Earth's age. Scores of scientists and engineers from Los Alamos National Laboratory —...
Read More
FILE - This Monday, Oct. 23, 2017 file photo show fall colors beginning to show along Route 209 in Reilly Township, Schuylkill County, Pa. Across the United States, 2017’s first freeze has been arriving further and further into the calendar, according to more than a century of measurements from weather stations nationwide. (David McKeown/Republican-Herald via AP)
October 27, 2017 - 4:07 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Winter is coming ... later. And it's leaving ever earlier. Across the United States, the year's first freeze has been arriving further and further into the calendar, according to more than a century of measurements from weather stations nationwide. Scientists say it is yet another...
Read More
Sarah Boryszewski is helped by her father Gerald Peete as they dig for belongings in the remains of Boryszewski's home in Coffey Park, Friday Oct. 20, 2017 in Santa Rosa, Calif. Northern California residents who fled a wildfire in the dead of night with only minutes to spare returned to their neighborhoods Friday for the first time in nearly two weeks to see if anything was standing. (Kent Porter/The Press Democrat via AP)
October 23, 2017 - 9:03 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A non-partisan federal watchdog says climate change is already costing U.S. taxpayers billions of dollars each year, with those costs expected to rise as devastating storms, floods, wildfires and droughts become more frequent in the coming decades. A Government Accountability...
Read More
Protesters gather outside a meeting where a climate change report was to be released, Monday, Oct. 23, 2017, in Providence, R.I. The Environmental Protection Agency kept of its three scientists, who had been expected to discuss the report on the health of Narragansett Bay, from speaking at the event. (AP Photo/Michelle R. Smith)
October 23, 2017 - 2:45 pm
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency kept three scientists from speaking at a Monday event in a move condemned by researchers and Democratic members of Congress as an attempt by the agency to silence a discussion of climate change. The scientists were scheduled to discuss a...
Read More
FILE - In this June 5, 2017, file photo, toxic froth from industrial pollution floats on Bellundur Lake on World Environment Day, in Bangalore, India. Environmental pollution - from filthy air to contaminated water - is killing more people every year than all war and violence in the world. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi, File)
October 20, 2017 - 12:02 am
NEW DELHI (AP) — Environmental pollution — from filthy air to contaminated water — is killing more people every year than all war and violence in the world. More than smoking, hunger or natural disasters. More than AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined. One out of every six premature deaths in...
Read More
October 04, 2017 - 4:17 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Trump's nominee to oversee chemical safety at the Environmental Protection Agency is promising to apply sound science in his new job. He also is defending his history on behalf of corporate clients of endorsing far higher exposures to toxins than the government now...
Read More
This April 2015 photo provided by John W. Chapman shows marine sea slugs from a derelict vessel from Iwate Prefecture, Japan which washed ashore in Oregon. On Thursday, Sept. 27, 2017, researchers reported nearly 300 species of fish, mussels and other sea creatures hitchhiked across the Pacific Ocean on debris from the 2011 Japanese tsunami, washing ashore alive in the United States. (John W. Chapman via AP)
September 28, 2017 - 8:56 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly 300 species of fish, mussels and other sea critters hitchhiked across the Pacific Ocean on debris from the 2011 Japanese tsunami, washing ashore alive in the United States, researchers reported Thursday. It is the largest and longest marine migration ever documented,...
Read More

Pages