Environmental science

FILE - In this Oct. 30, 2012 file photo, the intersection of 8th Street and Atlantic Avenue is flooded in Ocean City, N.J., after the storm surge from Superstorm Sandy flooded much of the town. New satellite research shows that global warming is making seas rise at an ever increasing rate. Scientists say melting ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica is speeding up sea level rise so that by the year 2100 on average oceans will be two feet higher than today, probably even more. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)
February 12, 2018 - 3:56 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — New satellite research shows melting ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are speeding up already rising seas. At the current rate, the world's oceans on average will be at least 2 feet (61 centimeters) higher by the end of the century compared to today, according to researchers...
Read More
January 11, 2018 - 6:52 am
BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say millions more people around the world are threatened by river floods in coming decades due to climate change. Researchers in Germany say greater flood defenses are particularly needed in the United States, parts of India and Africa, Indonesia and Central Europe. River...
Read More
December 10, 2017 - 10:11 am
PITTSBURGH (AP) — Authorities are investigating the death of a man found near a partially submerged sport utility vehicle in a river in Pittsburgh. Police said the body of 52-year-old Todd Patrick Wharton of Imperial was found face-up in the Allegheny River near the Carnegie Science Center shortly...
Read More
FILE - In this Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017 file photo, a neighborhood near Houston's Addicks Reservoir is flooded after heavy rains from Tropical Storm Harvey. A study released Monday, Nov. 20, 2017 predicts that summer thunderstorms in North America will likely be larger, wetter and more frequent in a warmer world, dumping 80 percent more rain in some areas and worsening flooding. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
November 20, 2017 - 7:40 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Summer thunderstorms in North America will likely be larger, wetter and more frequent in a warmer world, dumping 80 percent more rain in some areas and worsening flooding, a new study says. Future storms will also be wilder, soaking entire cities and huge portions of states,...
Read More
FILE - In this Tuesday, Aug. 29, 2017 file photo, a neighborhood near Houston's Addicks Reservoir is flooded after heavy rains from Tropical Storm Harvey. A study released Monday, Nov. 20, 2017 predicts that summer thunderstorms in North America will likely be larger, wetter and more frequent in a warmer world, dumping 80 percent more rain in some areas and worsening flooding. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
November 20, 2017 - 11:05 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study says summer thunderstorms in North America will likely be larger, wetter and more frequent in a warmer world, dumping 80 percent more rain in some areas and worsening flooding. The U.S. in recent years has experienced prolonged drenchings that have doused Nashville in...
Read More
FILE - In this June 2, 2017, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt speaks to the media during the daily briefing in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. Pruitt is set to speak privately to chemical industry executives next week during a conference at a luxury oceanfront golf resort. Pruitt is listed as the featured speaker at board meeting of the American Chemistry Council, a group that has lobbied against stricter regulations for chemical manufacturers. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
November 03, 2017 - 6:50 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration's top environmental regulator is set to speak privately to chemical industry executives next week during a conference at a luxury oceanfront golf resort. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt is listed as the featured speaker at a...
Read More
November 03, 2017 - 6:48 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the Environmental Protection Agency has named a slate of new members to federal science advisory boards, including several who work for chemical and fossil-fuel interests. EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt announced his appointments Friday, after saying he would block...
Read More
November 01, 2017 - 12:54 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's nominee for NASA chief has been criticized for promoting political divisiveness and rejecting climate change science. He says he'll run the space agency on a consensus agenda driven by science. Democrats weren't convinced Wednesday, with some calling him...
Read More
FILE - In this June 2, 2017 file photo, Environmental Protection Agency administrator Scott Pruitt speaks in the Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. Pruitt says he will replace the panels that advise him on science and public health issues with new members holding more diverse views. He announced the changes on Oct. 31, saying many previously appointed to the boards were potentially biased because they had received federal grants. The panels advise EPA on a wide range of issues, including drinking water standards and clean air regulations. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
October 31, 2017 - 9:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the Environmental Protection Agency said Tuesday he intends to replace the outside experts that advise him on science and public health issues with new board members holding more diverse views. In announcing the changes, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt suggested many...
Read More
FILE - In this Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017 file photo, a patient suffering from dengue fever lies in a hospital bed in Peshawar, Pakistan. Cases of dengue fever _ a painful mosquito-borne spread disease _ have doubled every decade since 1990 with 58.4 million cases and 10,000 deaths in 2013. Dr. Howard Frumkin, a former environmental health director at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said climate change, which allows mosquitoes to live in more places and stay active longer with shorter freeze seasons, is part but not all of the reason. (AP Photo/Muhammad Sajjad)
October 30, 2017 - 8:10 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Global warming is hurting people's health a bit more than previously thought, but there's hope that the Earth — and populations — can heal if the planet kicks its coal habit, a group of doctors and other experts said. The poor and elderly are most threatened by worsening climate...
Read More

Pages