Environmental concerns

Tank cars carrying crude oil are shown derailed about a mile south of Doon, Iowa, Friday, June 22, 2018. About 31 cars derailed after the tracks reportedly collapsed due to saturation from flood waters from adjacent Little Rock River. (Tim Hynds/Sioux City Journal via AP)
June 23, 2018 - 4:13 pm
DOON, Iowa (AP) — Crews were scrambling Saturday to clean up a BNSF oil train derailment in northwest Iowa that dumped crude into floodwaters, while officials seek to get a handle on the extent of the spill and its cause. Thirty-three oil tanker cars derailed Friday just south of Doon in Lyon...
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June 22, 2018 - 5:34 pm
TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — A nonprofit devoted to protecting jaguars believes one that was spotted in Arizona mountains in recent years has since died. Tucson-based Northern Jaguar Project obtained a photo of a jaguar pelt and provided it to the Arizona Daily Star, the newspaper reported . "We're very...
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In this photo taken in May 2018 in Canada and provided by Interpol on Wednesday, June 20, 2018, a Canadian wildlife officer inspects a Polar Bear pelt for trade compliance. International police agency Interpol said a giant operation against illegal trade in wildlife and timber resulted in millions of dollars-worth of seizures and the identification of 1,400 suspects across the world. (Interpol via AP)
June 20, 2018 - 9:57 pm
PARIS (AP) — Thousands of live animals along with tons of meat, ivory, pangolin scales and timber were seized in a monthlong global crackdown on the illegal wildlife trade that Interpol said exposed the international reach of traffickers. The live animals recovered in the stings included turtles in...
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FILE- In this Aug. 14, 2017 file photo, a couple kayak on the Rogue River adjacent to where Wolverine World Wide's tannery once stood, in Rockford, Mich. The Michigan Department of Environmental Quality is investigating the connection between old waste drums in the area and an old Wolverine World Wide tannery waste dump nearby. Some private wells in the area have tested positive for elevated levels of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances called PFAS, also called perfluorinated chemicals, or PFCs. A government report shows that a family of industrial chemicals turning up in public water supplies around the country threatens human health at concentrations seven to 10 times lower than previously realized. The chemicals are called perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl. (Neil Blake /The Grand Rapids Press via AP)
June 20, 2018 - 5:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A family of industrial chemicals turning up in public water supplies around the country is even more toxic than previously thought, threatening human health at concentrations seven to 10 times lower than once realized, according to a government report released Wednesday. The...
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June 18, 2018 - 7:12 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency on Monday approved the first state permit program for disposal of toxic ash from coal plants, a switch from federal oversight that the coal industry had sought. Coal ash is the residue left after burning coal to generate power. Utilities around...
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June 18, 2018 - 4:55 pm
New research suggests drinking water supplies in Pennsylvania have shown resilience in the face of a drilling boom that has turned swaths of countryside into a major production zone for natural gas. Energy companies have drilled more than 11,000 wells since arriving en masse in 2008, making...
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June 18, 2018 - 3:20 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — On June 23, 1988, a top NASA scientist told Congress and the world that global warming had arrived. NASA scientist James Hansen predicted that 1988 would be the world's hottest year on record, thanks to the burning of fossil fuels that released heat-trapping gases. The Associated...
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James Hansen sits for a portrait in his home in New York on April 12, 2018. NASA’s top climate scientist in 1988, Hansen warned the world on a record hot June day 30 years ago that global warming was here and worsening. In a scientific study that came out a couple months later, he even forecast how warm it would get, depending on emissions of heat-trapping gases. (AP Photo/Marshall Ritzel)
June 18, 2018 - 3:19 am
NEW YORK (AP) — James Hansen wishes he was wrong. He wasn't. NASA's top climate scientist in 1988, Hansen warned the world on a record hot June day 30 years ago that global warming was here and worsening. In a scientific study that came out a couple months later, he even forecast how warm it would...
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FILE - In this August, 2009, file photo provided by the Department of Defense, a Cook Inlet beluga whale calf, left, and an adult breach near Anchorage, Alaska. A new study concludes that endangered beluga whales in Cook Inlet changed their diet over five decades from saltwater prey to fish and crustaceans influenced by freshwater. The analysis of isotopes in beluga bone and teeth by University of Alaska Fairbanks researchers showed belugas formerly fed on prey that had little contact with freshwater. (Christopher Garner/Department of Defense via AP, File)
June 15, 2018 - 7:22 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Beluga whales in Alaska's Cook Inlet may have changed their diet over five decades from saltwater prey to fish and crustaceans influenced by freshwater, according to a study by University of Alaska Fairbanks researchers. An analysis of isotopes in beluga bone and teeth...
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In this image from video made available by NASA, astronaut Drew Feustel prepares to close a door to an atmospheric experiment during a space walk outside the International Space Station on Thursday, June 14, 2018. (NASA via AP)
June 14, 2018 - 1:29 pm
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Spacewalking astronauts set up TV cameras Thursday for new crew capsules set to arrive in coming months. The International Space Station's commander, Drew Feustel, and Ricky Arnold completed the installation — their main job — after struggling with a shield for...
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