Deserts

FILE - In this June 11, 2014 file photo, James Lyons and Florence Reaves, from Kirkwood, Mo., hike to a stone lookout over the Little Missouri River inside the Theodore Roosevelt National Park, located in the Badlands of North Dakota. An heir to the Wal-Mart fortune, a wealthy governor and energy companies operating in the North Dakota oil patch could fund a big chunk of the private money needed by developers of a presidential library for Theodore Roosevelt in the western Badlands. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)
May 05, 2019 - 11:05 am
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — A Walmart heir, a wealthy governor and energy companies profiting from North Dakota oil could fund a big chunk of the private money needed by developers of a presidential library for Theodore Roosevelt in the western Badlands where he hunted and ranched before becoming the...
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FILE - This March 6, 2014, file photo shows the idled Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, the nation's only underground nuclear waste repository, near Carlsbad, N.M. Shipments of waste to the repository resumed in April 2017 for the first time since a 2014 radiation release contaminated part of the facility. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan, File)
March 23, 2019 - 1:47 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — In a remote stretch of New Mexico desert, the U.S. government put in motion an experiment aimed at proving to the world that radioactive waste could be safely disposed of deep underground, rendering it less of a threat to the environment. Twenty years and more than 12,380...
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In this Wednesday, March 6, 2019, photo, a man looks on amid wildflowers in bloom near Borrego Springs, Calif. Two years after steady rains sparked seeds dormant for decades under the desert floor to burst open and produce a spectacular display dubbed the "super bloom," another winter soaking this year is shaping up to be possibly even better. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
March 08, 2019 - 11:58 am
BORREGO SPRINGS, Calif. (AP) — It started with the desert lilies in December. Since then a wave of wildflower blooms has been crescendoing across Southern California's Anza-Borrego desert in a burst of color so vivid it can be seen from mountain tops thousands of feet above. Two years after steady...
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Elephant seals and their pups occupy Drakes Beach, Friday, Feb. 1, 2019, in Point Reyes National Seashore, Calif. Tourists unable to visit a popular beach in Northern California that was taken over by a colony of nursing elephant seals during the government shutdown will be able to get an up-close view of the creatures, officials said Friday. Rangers and volunteer docents will lead small groups of visitors starting Saturday to the edge of a parking lot so they can safely see the elephant seals and their newborn pups, said park spokesman John Dell'Osso. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
February 01, 2019 - 8:19 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — National park visitors cut new trails in sensitive soil. They pried open gates while no one was watching. They found bathrooms locked, so they went outside. One off-roader even mowed down an iconic twisted-limbed Joshua tree in California. During the 35-day government shutdown...
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In this Oct. 18, 2018, photo provided by the Arizona Department of Public Safety is the scene where authorities say they rescued a seriously injured woman who spent six days in the desert after crashing her car near Wickenburg, Ariz. The Department of Public Safety said Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018, that rescuers found the severely dehydrated 53-year-old woman on Oct. 18 after following the vehicle's tracks. A maintenance crew and a rancher spotted the car while working along a highway several miles from the historic Western town of Wickenburg. (Arizona Department of Public Safety via AP)
October 31, 2018 - 7:52 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — Arizona transportation worker Zach Moralez knew something wasn't right when he saw a damaged fence along a highway. Tracks went off the edge of the road and through the fence on the edge of the hill. Moralez, a highway operations technician, knew there had to be a car at the bottom...
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August 19, 2018 - 6:07 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Climate change could be to blame for the collapse of bird populations in the desert along the Nevada-California border, scientists said. The number of bird species has fallen by an average of 43 percent over the past century at survey sites across an area larger than New York state...
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FILE - In this Thursday Aug. 5, 2010 file photo, No More Deaths volunteer Katie Maloney checks water jugs at the group's camp before heading out to supply water stations for illegal immigrants near Arivaca, Ariz., about 13 miles north of Mexico. Arizona clergy are calling activists to gather this weekend at the state's border with Mexico and leave large bottles of water on remote trails for migrants who continue to cross the desert during the dangerously hot summer. (AP Photo/Amanda Lee Myers,File)
August 03, 2018 - 6:00 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — Arizona clergy are calling activists to gather this weekend at the state's border with Mexico and leave large jugs of water on remote trails for migrants who continue to cross the desert during the dangerously hot summer. The Sunday gathering organized by faith leaders and local...
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World Food Program executive director David Beasley talks during an interview at the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade in Canberra, Australia, Monday, March 26, 2018. Beasley says the collapse of the Islamic State movement’s self-described caliphate across Syria and Iraq has led to extremists mounting a recruitment drive in sub-Sahara Africa which threatens to trigger a new European migrant crisis. (AP Photo/Rod McGuirk)
March 26, 2018 - 6:55 am
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — The head of the United Nations food agency warned Monday that the relocation of Islamic State group members from the Middle East to Africa could trigger a massive new European migrant crisis. David Beasley, executive director of the World Food Program, said many of the...
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This 2011 photo from a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service motion-activated camera shows an elephant seal in the Channel Islands National Park off the coast of Southern California. Motion-detecting wildlife cameras devices are getting smaller, cheaper and more reliable, and scientists across the United State are using them to document elusive creatures like never before. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)
January 17, 2018 - 2:15 pm
CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — How does a bighorn sheep say "cheese?" Some charismatic critters caught by motion-detecting wildlife cameras seem to know how to strike a pose. But it's not just show business. As these devices get ever smaller, cheaper and more reliable, scientists across the U.S. are using...
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November 08, 2017 - 6:12 am
MARRAKECH, Morocco (AP) — Morocco has launched its first observation satellite, to be used for military activities, surveillance of its borders and coastline and monitoring desertification in the region. The Mohammed VI-A satellite was launched Wednesday from Kourou, French Guiana, in the presence...
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