Coastlines and beaches

In this undated photo provided by Eric Regehr, polar bears are seen on Wrangel Island in the Arctic Circle. A study of polar bears in the Chukchi Sea between Alaska and Russia finds that the population is thriving for now despite a loss of sea ice due to climate change. Lead author Eric Regehr of the University of Washington says the Chukchi may be buffered from some effects of ice loss. Regehr says polar bears can build fat reserves and the Chukchi's abundant seal population may allow bears to compensate for a loss of hunting time on ice. (AP Photo Eric Regehr via AP)
November 15, 2018 - 8:43 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The first formal count of polar bears in waters between the United States and Russia indicates they're doing better than some of their cousins elsewhere. Polar bears are listed as a threatened species because of diminished sea ice due to climate change. But university and...
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November 14, 2018 - 3:42 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The U.S. Senate has approved a new policy on ships that dump ballast water in coastal ports and the Great Lakes, a practice blamed for spreading invasive species that damage the environment and the economy. The ballast plan is contained in a $10.6 billion Coast Guard...
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FILE - In this Sept. 2, 2016, file photo, a friend's basket of clams sit in the water as Mike Suprin, of Rollinsford, N.H., calls it a day after filling his basket with softshell clams at Cape Porpoise in Kennebunkport, Maine. A study by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientists released in 2018 concluded that valuable species of shellfish, including softshell clams, have become harder to find on the East Coast because of degraded habitats caused by a warming environment. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
November 11, 2018 - 2:44 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Valuable species of shellfish have become harder to find on the East Coast because of degraded habitat caused by a warming environment, according to a pair of scientists that sought to find out whether environmental factors or overfishing was the source of the decline. The...
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In this Wednesday, Oct. 3, 2018, photo, Abdoulaye Camara, an immigrant from Mauritania, waits at the Dasmesh Darbar Sikh temple in Salem, Ore. Camara was one of 124 migrants who were detained near the border with Mexico in May 2018, and sent to a federal prison in Oregon, the result of the Trump administration's zero tolerance policy. (AP Photo/Amanda Loman)
November 09, 2018 - 11:19 am
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The young man traversed Andean mountains, plains and cities in buses, took a harrowing boat ride in which five fellow migrants drowned, walked through thick jungle for days, and finally reached the U.S.-Mexico border. Then Abdoulaye Camara, from the poor West African country of...
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In this Oct. 23, 2018 photo, Ronald Lauricella cradles a kitten in his front yard in Bay County, Fla.,. The rural Bay County resident says some on the outskirts of the cities aren't getting needed services like electricity as fast as the populated areas. (AP Photo/Tamara Lush)
October 26, 2018 - 1:15 am
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (AP) — More than two weeks after the powerful eyewall of Hurricane Michael passed over Bay County, Mark Ward wonders when the power will work again. And the sewer. And the water. "We've been living out of coolers. We've been grilling out." He points to a red cooler and two grills...
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A family stands near their damaged home and debris in the aftermath of Hurricane Willa, in Escuinapa, Mexico, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018. Emergency workers on Wednesday were struggling to reach beach towns left incommunicado by a blow from Willa. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
October 24, 2018 - 2:18 pm
MAZATLAN, Mexico (AP) — Emergency workers struggled to reach beach towns left incommunicado by a blow from Hurricane Willa on Wednesday, and the storm continued to force evacuations due to fear of flooding even as it dissipated over northern Mexico. There were no immediate reports of deaths or...
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A couple and their dog stand of the seawall prior the landfall of Hurricane Willa, in Mazatlan, Mexico, Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. Emergency officials said they evacuated more than 4,250 people in coastal towns and set up 58 shelters ahead of the dangerous Category 3 storm. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
October 24, 2018 - 7:51 am
MAZATLAN, Mexico (AP) — The Latest on Hurricane Willa (all times local): 5:45 a.m. Once-mighty Hurricane Willa has weakened into a tropical depression as it moves rapidly over west-central Mexico. The U.S. National Hurricane Center says the storm had maximum sustained winds of 35 mph (55 kph) early...
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View of the beach before the arrival of Hurricane Willa in Mazatlan, Mexico, Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2018. "Extremely dangerous" Hurricane Willa headed toward a Tuesday afternoon collision with a stretch of Mexico's Pacific coast, its strong winds and high waves threatening high-rise resorts, surfing beaches and fishing villages. (AP Photo/Marco Ugarte)
October 23, 2018 - 4:09 pm
MAZATLAN, Mexico (AP) — Hurricane Willa roared over an offshore penal colony and closed in on Mexico's Pacific coast with 120 mph (195 kph) winds Tuesday, threatening a major resort area along with fishing villages and farms. Emergency officials said they evacuated more than 4,250 people in coastal...
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This GOES East satellite image provided by NOAA shows Hurricane Willa in the eastern Pacific, on a path toward Mexico's Pacific coast on Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. (NOAA via AP)
October 22, 2018 - 5:42 pm
MEXICO CITY (AP) — A potential catastrophic Hurricane Willa swept toward Mexico's Pacific coast with winds of 155 mph (250 kph) Monday, threatening a stretch of high-rise resort hotels, surfing beaches and fishing villages. After briefly reaching Category 5 strength, the storm's maximum sustained...
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Sandra Sheffield, 72, uses a washcloth to wipe sweat from her face, in her home, which now has no electricity, in the aftermath of Hurricane Michael in Panama City, Fla., Wednesday, Oct. 17, 2018. She and her husband refuse to leave their home, and neighbors are trying to assist them with fans and a generator. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
October 18, 2018 - 10:50 pm
MEXICO BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Missing relatives and worries that looters are just outside the door. Dirty clothes. Hours-long lines for gasoline, insurance adjusters, food and water. No power, no air conditioning, no schools, no information and little real improvement in sight. Daily life is a series...
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