Climatology

FILE - In this May 16, 2018, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt appears before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee on the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies on budget on Capitol Hill in Washington. President Trump tweeted Thursday, July 5, he accepted the resignation of Pruitt. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
July 06, 2018 - 7:38 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Bowing out after months of scandals, Scott Pruitt is turning the Environmental Protection Agency over to a far less flashy deputy who is expected to continue Pruitt's rule-cutting, business-friendly ways as steward of the country's environment. With Pruitt's departure, President...
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FILE - In this Feb. 12, 2018, file photo, LGBT activists shout slogans during a rally against a planned revision to Indonesia's criminal code that would criminalize unmarried and gay sex outside the Parliament in Jakarta, Indonesia. The death of a 20-year-old man with HIV who died after "effectively committed suicide" by stopping anti-viral medication is a sign of an out of control but little acknowledged epidemic of HIV among gay men in Indonesia that researchers say is now being fueled by a gay hate climate fostered by the country's conservative political and religious leaders. (AP Photo/Tatan Syuflana, File)
July 02, 2018 - 2:48 am
JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Disowned by his father and ill-equipped to deal with the stigma of HIV/AIDS, a young man who died in the central Indonesian city of Yogyakarta early this year had "effectively committed suicide" by stopping anti-viral medication, according to a doctor familiar with the...
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June 25, 2018 - 9:53 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A U.S. judge who held a hearing about climate change that received widespread attention ruled Monday that Congress and the president were best suited to address the contribution of fossil fuels to global warming, throwing out lawsuits that sought to hold big oil companies...
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June 18, 2018 - 3:20 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — On June 23, 1988, a top NASA scientist told Congress and the world that global warming had arrived. NASA scientist James Hansen predicted that 1988 would be the world's hottest year on record, thanks to the burning of fossil fuels that released heat-trapping gases. The Associated...
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James Hansen sits for a portrait in his home in New York on April 12, 2018. NASA’s top climate scientist in 1988, Hansen warned the world on a record hot June day 30 years ago that global warming was here and worsening. In a scientific study that came out a couple months later, he even forecast how warm it would get, depending on emissions of heat-trapping gases. (AP Photo/Marshall Ritzel)
June 18, 2018 - 3:19 am
NEW YORK (AP) — James Hansen wishes he was wrong. He wasn't. NASA's top climate scientist in 1988, Hansen warned the world on a record hot June day 30 years ago that global warming was here and worsening. In a scientific study that came out a couple months later, he even forecast how warm it would...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, May 15, 2018 file photo, Rick Stewart sits in the sunshine with the New York City skyline in the background, in a park in Weehawken, N.J. According to weather records released on Wednesday, June 6, 2018, May reached a record 65.4 degrees in the continental United States, which is 5.2 degrees above the 20th century average. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
June 06, 2018 - 5:16 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Record heat returned to the United States with a vengeance in May. May warmed to a record average 65.4 degrees in the Lower 48 states, breaking the high of 64.7 set in 1934, according to federal weather figures released Wednesday. May was 5.2 degrees above the 20th century's...
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FILE - In this May 16, 2018, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt testifies before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee on the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies on budget on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
May 26, 2018 - 8:05 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Newly released emails show senior Environmental Protection Agency officials working closely with a conservative group that dismisses climate change to rally like-minded people for public hearings on science and global warming, counter negative news coverage and promote...
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FILE - In this May 16, 2018, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt testifies before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee on the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies on budget on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
May 26, 2018 - 12:47 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Senior Environmental Protection Agency officials have been working closely with a conservative group that dismisses climate change to rally like-minded people for public hearings on science and global warming. Recently released emails show they also recruited help to counter...
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FILE - In this May 16, 2018, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt testifies before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee on the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies on budget on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
May 25, 2018 - 10:07 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Newly released emails show senior Environmental Protection Agency officials working closely with a conservative group that dismisses climate change to rally like-minded people for public hearings on science and global warming, counter negative news coverage and tout Administrator...
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FILE - In this Dec. 7, 2009, file photo, demonstrators block the main entrance of Chevron Corp. in San Ramon, Calif. A federal judge presiding over lawsuits accusing big oil companies of lying about global warming is turning his courtroom into a classroom. U.S. District Judge William Alsup has asked lawyers for two California cities and five of the world's largest oil and gas companies to come to court on Wednesday, March 21, 2018, to present "the best science now available on global warming." (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)
March 21, 2018 - 7:15 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — There were no test tubes or Bunsen burners, but a courtroom turned into a science classroom Wednesday for a U.S. judge considering lawsuits that accuse big oil companies of lying about the role of fossil fuels in the Earth's warming environment. Leading researchers taught U.S...
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