Climate change

June 18, 2018 - 3:20 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — On June 23, 1988, a top NASA scientist told Congress and the world that global warming had arrived. NASA scientist James Hansen predicted that 1988 would be the world's hottest year on record, thanks to the burning of fossil fuels that released heat-trapping gases. The Associated...
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James Hansen sits for a portrait in his home in New York on April 12, 2018. NASA’s top climate scientist in 1988, Hansen warned the world on a record hot June day 30 years ago that global warming was here and worsening. In a scientific study that came out a couple months later, he even forecast how warm it would get, depending on emissions of heat-trapping gases. (AP Photo/Marshall Ritzel)
June 18, 2018 - 3:19 am
NEW YORK (AP) — James Hansen wishes he was wrong. He wasn't. NASA's top climate scientist in 1988, Hansen warned the world on a record hot June day 30 years ago that global warming was here and worsening. In a scientific study that came out a couple months later, he even forecast how warm it would...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, May 1, 2018 file photo, the Richmond city skyline is seen on the horizon behind the coal ash ponds near Dominion Energy's Chesterfield Power Station in Chester, Va. On June 7, 2018, scientists reported the amount of heat-trapping carbon dioxide in the air peaked again this year at record levels. Carbon dioxide is a major greenhouse gas and comes from the burning of coal, gas and oil. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
June 07, 2018 - 2:59 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The amount of heat-trapping carbon dioxide in the air peaked again this year at record levels, scientists reported Thursday. The National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday that carbon dioxide levels averaged 411.25 parts per million in May at the federal Mauna Loa...
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FILE - In this May 16, 2018, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt testifies before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee on the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies on budget on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
May 26, 2018 - 8:05 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Newly released emails show senior Environmental Protection Agency officials working closely with a conservative group that dismisses climate change to rally like-minded people for public hearings on science and global warming, counter negative news coverage and promote...
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FILE - In this May 16, 2018, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt testifies before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee on the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies on budget on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
May 26, 2018 - 12:47 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Senior Environmental Protection Agency officials have been working closely with a conservative group that dismisses climate change to rally like-minded people for public hearings on science and global warming. Recently released emails show they also recruited help to counter...
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FILE - In this May 16, 2018, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt testifies before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee on the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies on budget on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
May 25, 2018 - 10:07 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Newly released emails show senior Environmental Protection Agency officials working closely with a conservative group that dismisses climate change to rally like-minded people for public hearings on science and global warming, counter negative news coverage and tout Administrator...
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In this Wednesday, May 23, 2018, photo, Sky Running Enemy, left, and his sister, Kendalyn Running Enemy, are among about dozens of people who gathered in Elks Riverside Park in Great Falls, Mont. to protest the construction of the Keystone XL Pipeline. They were joined by their mother, Debbie McShane, holding the American Indian Movement flag. Attorneys for the Trump administration were due in a Montana courtroom Thursday to defend the disputed Keystone XL oil sands pipeline against environmental groups that want to derail the project. (Karl Puckett/The Great Falls Tribune via AP)
May 24, 2018 - 5:09 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Trump administration attorneys defended the disputed Keystone XL oil sands pipeline in federal court on Thursday against environmentalists and Native American groups that want to derail the project. President Barack Obama rejected the 1,179-mile (1,800-kilometer) line...
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FILE - This Tuesday, May 24, 2016 file photo shows the former Oakland Army Base pier with the Port of Oakland in the background in Oakland, Calif. A federal judge in California on Tuesday, May 15, 2018, struck down the city of Oakland's ban on coal shipments at a proposed cargo terminal, siding with a developer who wants to use the site to transport Utah coal to Asia. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)
May 15, 2018 - 6:59 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A federal judge in California on Tuesday struck down the city of Oakland's ban on coal shipments at a proposed cargo terminal, siding with a developer who wants to use the site to transport Utah coal to Asia. In a scathing ruling, U.S. District Judge Vince Chhabria in San...
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Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke testifies at a Senate Appropriations subcommittee hearing on the FY19 budget, Thursday, May 10, 2018, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
May 15, 2018 - 4:34 pm
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Environmental groups and three Montana landowners sued Tuesday to cancel hundreds of recent oil and gas lease sales, saying the U.S. government's leasing of public lands is skyrocketing without understanding how all that drilling will affect water quality and climate change...
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FILE - In this Dec. 12, 2017 file photo, Special envoy to the United Nations for climate change Michael Bloomberg addresses the media at the One Planet Summit, in Boulogne-Billancourt, near Paris, France. Americans are facing an "epidemic of dishonesty" in Washington that's more dangerous than terrorism or communism. That's according to former the New York City Mayor who warned in a commencement speech on Saturday, May 12, 2018 at Texas' Rice University that "an endless barrage of lies" and a trend toward "alternate realities" in national politics pose a dire threat to U.S. democracy. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)
May 12, 2018 - 11:19 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Americans are facing an "epidemic of dishonesty" in Washington that's more dangerous than terrorism or communism. That's according to former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who warned in a commencement speech on Saturday at Texas' Rice University that "an endless barrage of...
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