Climate

June 18, 2018 - 3:20 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — On June 23, 1988, a top NASA scientist told Congress and the world that global warming had arrived. NASA scientist James Hansen predicted that 1988 would be the world's hottest year on record, thanks to the burning of fossil fuels that released heat-trapping gases. The Associated...
Read More
James Hansen sits for a portrait in his home in New York on April 12, 2018. NASA’s top climate scientist in 1988, Hansen warned the world on a record hot June day 30 years ago that global warming was here and worsening. In a scientific study that came out a couple months later, he even forecast how warm it would get, depending on emissions of heat-trapping gases. (AP Photo/Marshall Ritzel)
June 18, 2018 - 3:19 am
NEW YORK (AP) — James Hansen wishes he was wrong. He wasn't. NASA's top climate scientist in 1988, Hansen warned the world on a record hot June day 30 years ago that global warming was here and worsening. In a scientific study that came out a couple months later, he even forecast how warm it would...
Read More
FILE - In this Tuesday, May 1, 2018 file photo, the Richmond city skyline is seen on the horizon behind the coal ash ponds near Dominion Energy's Chesterfield Power Station in Chester, Va. On June 7, 2018, scientists reported the amount of heat-trapping carbon dioxide in the air peaked again this year at record levels. Carbon dioxide is a major greenhouse gas and comes from the burning of coal, gas and oil. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
June 07, 2018 - 2:59 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The amount of heat-trapping carbon dioxide in the air peaked again this year at record levels, scientists reported Thursday. The National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration said Thursday that carbon dioxide levels averaged 411.25 parts per million in May at the federal Mauna Loa...
Read More
First lady Melania Trump, center, accompanied by Vice President Mike Pence, left, applauds as President Donald Trump speaks to employees at the Federal Emergency Management Agency Headquarters, Wednesday, June 6, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
June 06, 2018 - 8:00 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Melania Trump has reappeared. The first lady showed herself in public Wednesday for the first time in nearly a month, seated alongside her husband, President Donald Trump, for a briefing on the federal government's preparedness for the hurricane season that began June 1. The...
Read More
FILE - In this Tuesday, May 15, 2018 file photo, Rick Stewart sits in the sunshine with the New York City skyline in the background, in a park in Weehawken, N.J. According to weather records released on Wednesday, June 6, 2018, May reached a record 65.4 degrees in the continental United States, which is 5.2 degrees above the 20th century average. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
June 06, 2018 - 5:16 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Record heat returned to the United States with a vengeance in May. May warmed to a record average 65.4 degrees in the Lower 48 states, breaking the high of 64.7 set in 1934, according to federal weather figures released Wednesday. May was 5.2 degrees above the 20th century's...
Read More
Beachgoers walk on Okaloosa Island in Fort Walton Beach, Fla., Monday, May 28, 2018, as Subtropical Storm Alberto approaches the Gulf Coast. The storm's gusty rain and brisk winds roiled the seas near the U.S. Gulf Coast on Monday, keeping white sandy beaches emptied of their usual Memorial Day crowds. (Nick Tomecek/Northwest Florida Daily News via AP)
May 30, 2018 - 6:54 am
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — Mudslides triggered by the soggy remnants of Alberto forced evacuations below a dam and closed an interstate highway in the western mountains of North Carolina on Wednesday. Forecasters warned that the leftovers of the Atlantic hurricane season's first named storm are still...
Read More
A surfer makes his way out into the water as a subtropical approaches on Monday, May 28, 2018, in Pensacola, Fla. The storm gained the early jump on the 2018 hurricane season as it headed toward anticipated landfall sometime Monday on the northern Gulf Coast, where white sandy beaches emptied of their usual Memorial Day crowds. (AP Photo/Dan Anderson)
May 28, 2018 - 9:53 pm
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (AP) — The Latest on Subtropical Storm Alberto (all times local): 9:15 p.m. Authorities so far haven't attributed any deaths or injuries directly to Subtropical Storm Alberto. But in North Carolina, a television news anchor and a photojournalist have died when a tree fell on their...
Read More
American flags placed in honor of Memorial Day are reflected in puddles at the Panama City Marina as Subtropical Storm Alberto approaches Panama City, Fla., Monday, May 28, 2018. (Joshua Boucher/News Herald via AP)
May 28, 2018 - 8:31 pm
Subtropical Storm Alberto rumbled inland Monday after its Memorial Day strike on the U.S. Gulf Coast, driving holiday weekend beachgoers away as heavy rains began pelting wide areas of the Southeast amid a rising flood threat. Forecasters warned that downpours from the vast system of swirling storm...
Read More
Empty beaches and low-hanging clouds are shown, Friday, May 25, 2018, at Fort Lauderdale Beach in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. A storm kicking up in the Caribbean Sea is threatening to bring heavy rainfall and flash floods to parts of Mexico, Cuba, Florida and the eastern U.S. Gulf Coast this weekend and possibly beyond. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)
May 26, 2018 - 9:26 am
MIAMI (AP) — A storm moving slowly through the Gulf of Mexico is threatening to bring heavy rainfall, storm surges, high winds, and flash floods to the U.S. Gulf Coast this holiday weekend. Subtropical Storm Alberto - the first named storm of the 2018 hurricane season - roiled parts of coastal...
Read More
FILE - In this May 16, 2018, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt testifies before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee on the Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies on budget on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
May 26, 2018 - 8:05 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Newly released emails show senior Environmental Protection Agency officials working closely with a conservative group that dismisses climate change to rally like-minded people for public hearings on science and global warming, counter negative news coverage and promote...
Read More

Pages