Bullying

In this spring 2017 photo provided by Matthew Leach, his son, Andy Leach, poses at an auto race near Southaven, Miss. More than a month has passed since the 12-year-old boy hanged himself in his father’s garage after being bullied at school in Mississippi. While Andy Leach’s family waits for answers, experts say his school’s bullying policy lacks some key elements, such as written consequences for bullies and detailed support for victims. Matthew Leach said the bullying escalated after his sixth-grader said he might be bisexual.(Matthew Leach via AP)
April 13, 2018 - 11:53 am
SOUTHAVEN, Miss. (AP) — Andy Leach was a silly 12-year-old boy with a contagious smile before relentless bullying pushed him to kill himself, his father says. "Everybody really enjoyed to be around Andy," and he had much to look forward to — he loved being a Boy Scout and hoped to play saxophone in...
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Jeff Richmond, left, and Tina Fey participate in the curtain call for the "Mean Girls" opening night on Broadway at the August Wilson Theatre on Sunday, April 8, 2018, in New York. (Photo by Greg Allen/Invision/AP)
April 09, 2018 - 10:39 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Tina Fey had no idea "Mean Girls" would be timelier today than it was 14 years ago. And that makes her a little uneasy. "It's just sort of unfortunate that it does," the Emmy-winning actress and writer said Sunday at the opening night party for her Broadway adaptation of the 2004...
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March 13, 2018 - 2:17 am
HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — A Pennsylvania lawmaker has introduced legislation that could have parents footing the bill if their child bullies another kid at school. State Rep. Frank Burns' bill gives parents three strikes. The first time a child bullies someone, the school is required to inform his or...
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March 06, 2018 - 1:16 pm
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — In a story March 5 about school bullying, The Associated Press erroneously reported the details of a boy's suicide. Jacobe Taras killed himself with a hunting rifle when he was 13, not a shotgun when he was 12. A corrected version of the story is below: Should schools be...
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January 30, 2018 - 10:57 pm
LEBANON, Tenn. (AP) — A Tennessee high school student's anti-bullying video has drawn nearly 600,000 views on YouTube and netted a two-day suspension for its 16-year-old creator. Emily Gipson tells news outlets school that administrators accused her of "trying to incite violence" and handed her the...
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May 27, 2017 - 6:08 pm
DANVILLE, Calif. (AP) — The parents of a 16-year-old girl who was filmed urinating in a bathroom stall say officials at a California high school aren't doing enough to punish the perpetrator who received a three-day suspension after she admitted to posting the video on social media. The 17-year-old...
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FILE - This Feb. 3, 2015, file photo, Eagle Mountain Republican Rep. David Lifferth appears on the house floor at the Utah State Capitol, in Salt Lake City. Utah lawmakers say they hope a new, unique law cuts down on the expanding and increasingly troubling forms of cyber harassment by giving authorities the ability to send the online bullies to jail. Last year, Utah legislators considered a similar bill, but stripped out the personally identifiable information portion because some committee members were concerned with how broad some terms in that section were, said than Republican Rep. Lifferth, who sponsored the 2016 bill. Lifferth's bill was never passed because lawmakers say they ran out of time. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
May 25, 2017 - 9:28 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Utah lawmakers hope a new, unusual law cuts down on increasingly troubling forms of cyber harassment by giving authorities the ability to send online bullies to jail for a year. Law enforcement, school officials and support groups back the effort, but some lawyers and a...
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FILE - This Feb. 3, 2015, file photo, Eagle Mountain Republican Rep. David Lifferth appears on the house floor at the Utah State Capitol, in Salt Lake City. Utah lawmakers say they hope a new, unique law cuts down on the expanding and increasingly troubling forms of cyber harassment by giving authorities the ability to send the online bullies to jail. Last year, Utah legislators considered a similar bill, but stripped out the personally identifiable information portion because some committee members were concerned with how broad some terms in that section were, said than Republican Rep. Lifferth, who sponsored the 2016 bill. Lifferth's bill was never passed because lawmakers say they ran out of time. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
May 25, 2017 - 8:36 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Utah lawmakers hope a new, unusual law cuts down on increasingly troubling forms of cyber harassment by giving authorities the ability to send online bullies to jail for a year. Law enforcement, school officials and support groups back the effort, but some lawyers and a...
Read More
FILE - This Feb. 3, 2015, file photo, Eagle Mountain Republican Rep. David Lifferth appears on the house floor at the Utah State Capitol, in Salt Lake City. Utah lawmakers say they hope a new, unique law cuts down on the expanding and increasingly troubling forms of cyber harassment by giving authorities the ability to send the online bullies to jail. Last year, Utah legislators considered a similar bill, but stripped out the personally identifiable information portion because some committee members were concerned with how broad some terms in that section were, said than Republican Rep. Lifferth, who sponsored the 2016 bill. Lifferth's bill was never passed because lawmakers say they ran out of time. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
May 25, 2017 - 8:29 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Utah lawmakers hope a new, unusual law cuts down on increasingly troubling forms of cyber harassment by giving authorities the ability to send online bullies to jail for a year. Law enforcement, school officials and support groups back the effort, but some lawyers and a...
Read More
FILE - In this Feb. 29, 2016 file photo, teacher Kelly Gasior, left, and students, from left, Olivia Mashtaire, Ryan Lysek, Christian Vazquez and Tyler Lysek stand with a statue of a Buffalo that's been emblazoned with anti-bullying messages outside Lorraine Academy, Public School No. 72, in Buffalo, N.Y. One in every 5 middle and high school students has complained of being bullied at school and the number of reports of sexual assault on college campuses has more than tripled over the past decade, according to a federal study released Tuesday, May 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Thompson, File)
May 16, 2017 - 4:29 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — One in every 5 middle and high school students has complained of being bullied at school and the number of reports of sexual assault on college campuses has more than tripled over the past decade, according to a federal study released Tuesday. "There are areas of concern in terms...
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