Botany

FILE - In this June 7, 2017, file photo, two wild elephants, part of a herd that arrived at a wetland near the Thakurkuchi railway station engage in a tussle on the outskirts of Gauhati, Assam, India. Development that’s led to loss of habitat, climate change, overfishing, pollution and invasive species is causing a biodiversity crisis, scientists say in a new United Nations science report released Monday, May 6, 2019. (AP Photo/ Anupam Nath, File)
May 06, 2019 - 6:41 am
Nature is in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, with extinction looming over 1 million species of plants and animals, scientists said Monday in the United Nations' first comprehensive report on biodiversity. It's all because of humans, but it's not too late to fix the problem...
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This Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019 photo shows male mosquitos at the the Vosshall Laboratory at Rockefeller University in New York. In 2018, researchers at the lab published a much-improved description of the DNA code for a particularly dangerous species of mosquito: Aedes aegypti, notorious for spreading Zika, dengue and yellow fever. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
March 29, 2019 - 11:25 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Just about every week, it seems, scientists publish the unique DNA code of some creature or plant. Just in February, they published the genome for the strawberry, the paper mulberry tree, the great white shark and the Antarctic blackfin icefish. They also announced that, thanks to a...
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In this June 8, 2018 image taken from video, dairy cows eat feed mixed with seaweed in a dairy farm at the University of California, Davis, in Davis, Calif. UC Davis is studying whether adding small amounts of seaweed to cattle feed can help reduce their emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas that's released when cattle burp, pass gas or make manure. Dairy farms and other livestock operations are major sources of methane. (AP Photo/Terry Chea)
August 31, 2018 - 1:39 pm
DAVIS, Calif. (AP) — University of California researchers are feeding seaweed to dairy cows in an attempt to make cattle more climate-friendly. UC Davis is studying whether adding small amounts of seaweed to cattle feed can help reduce their emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas that's...
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July 19, 2018 - 2:26 pm
DENVER (AP) — The Trump administration on Thursday proposed ending automatic protections for threatened animal and plant species and limiting habitat safeguards that are meant to shield recovering species from harm. Administration officials said the new rules would advance conservation by...
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July 18, 2018 - 11:19 am
ESSEX, Vt. (AP) — A woman was left with severe burns and blisters on her legs after encountering an invasive species of plant in Vermont. Charlotte Murphy says she developed painful blisters overnight after brushing against poison parsnip. Murphy says the blisters got so bad she had to go to the...
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Save The Redwoods League board member John Montague, left, is joined by Todd McMahon, vice president of NCRM Inc., an environmental consulting firm that helps manage League projects and writer Glen Martin as they stand among the mature redwoods of Harold Richardson Redwoods Reserve in Stewarts Point, Calif., March 28, 2018. The grove in Northern California with hundreds of ancient redwood trees, some taller than the Statue of Liberty, is being acquired by environmental group Save the Redwoods League that plans to preserve it and open a new public park, the group announced Tuesday, June 26, 2018. (Mike Shoys/Save the Redwoods League via AP)
June 26, 2018 - 8:32 pm
STEWARTS POINT, Calif. (AP) — An environmental group said Tuesday that it is acquiring a grove in Northern California with hundreds of ancient redwood trees, some taller than the Statue of Liberty, and is planning to preserve it and open a public park. Save the Redwoods League said it is purchasing...
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This undated photo provided by Rich Hatfield shows a western bumble bee (Bombus occidentalis) lands on Canada goldenrod. The Pacific Northwest Bumble Bee Atlas for Idaho, Oregon and Washington that started this month aims to accumulate detailed information about bumblebees with the help of hundreds of citizen scientists spreading out across the three states. (Rich Hatfield/The Xerces Society via AP)
June 17, 2018 - 1:20 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Hundreds of citizen scientists have begun buzzing through locations across the Pacific Northwest seeking a better understanding about nearly 30 bumblebee species. Bumblebees, experts say, are important pollinators for both wild and agricultural plants, but some species have...
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FILE- In this October 2017 file photo, a black bear walks in Granite Basin, amid low-lying blueberry thickets, in Juneau, Alaska. A study of bears and berries has determined that the big animals are the main dispersers of fruit seeds in southeast Alaska. The study by Oregon State University researchers says it's the first instance of a temperate plant being primarily dispersed by mammals through their excrement rather than by birds. (AP Photo/Becky Bohrer)
February 17, 2018 - 1:20 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Does a bear leave scat in the woods? The answer is obvious but the effects on an ecosystem may not be. A study by Oregon State University researchers concludes that brown and black bears, and not birds, as commonly thought, are primary distributers of small fruit seeds in...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, April 5, 2016 file photo, snowflakes stick to a car window in Brookfield, Wis. To form ice that creates snowflakes, moisture high in the atmosphere clings to particles that may include dust specks and or pollen. Add germs to that list. University of Florida microbiologist Brent Christner has found that bacteria from plants are surprisingly common ice "nucleators" _ in populated areas, barren mountain peaks and even Antarctica. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)
December 20, 2017 - 1:34 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Are poinsettias really poisonous? Are snowflakes really pure as the driven snow? Does feasting really put on the pounds? Sure as sugarplums, myths and misconceptions pop up every holiday season. Here's what science says about some of them: FLOWER POWER Poinsettias, those showy...
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This 2011 photo provided by Edwige Moyroud shows an Ursinia speciosa flower. The region at the base of the petals contains a dark pigment but appears blue at certain angles due to an optical effect on the surface of the cells. The color makes flowers more visible to the bees. (Edwige Moyroud via AP)
October 18, 2017 - 5:16 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Some flowers have found a nifty way to get the blues. They create a blue halo, apparently to attract the bees they need for pollination, scientists reported Wednesday. Bees are drawn to the color blue, but it's hard for flowers to make that color in their petals. Instead, some...
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