Agriculture

FILE- In this Friday, Oct. 14, 2016, file photo, an Indian fisherman pulls back his fishing net with his early morning catches at a beach in Goa, India. Two years after switching nets, Indian fishermen say local fish stocks are recovering since they adopted a square-shaped mesh that allows small fish to escape to maintain a breeding population. The project is one of many being showcased at a major conference on oceans beginning Monday, June 5, 2017, at U.N. headquarters, where the United Nations will plead with nations to help halt a global assault on marine life and ecosystems that is threatening jobs, economies and even human lives. (AP Photo/Anupam Nath, File)
June 02, 2017 - 9:52 pm
SINDHUDURG, India (AP) — The fishermen were dubious when ocean experts suggested they could save their dwindling marine stocks just by switching to new nets. It took years for the U.N. Development Program to convince the fishing communities along India's tropical western coast that the diamond-mesh...
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FILE - This March 29, 2012, file photo, shows the beef product that critics call "pink slime" during a plant tour of Beef Products Inc. in South Sioux City, Neb. Jury selection is set to start Wednesday, May 31, 2017, in a defamation case over ABC news reports on a South Dakota meat producer's lean, finely textured beef product, which critics dubbed "pink slime." Dakota Dunes-based Beef Products Inc. sued the TV network in 2012. It says ABC misled consumers into believing the product is unsafe, leading to layoffs and plant closures. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)
May 30, 2017 - 6:23 pm
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — Jury selection starts Wednesday in a more than $1 billion defamation case over ABC news reports on a South Dakota meat producer's lean, finely textured beef product, which critics have dubbed "pink slime." The trial in state court is scheduled to last until late July. A...
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Zimbabwes tobacco farmers sleep in an auction house at the Tobacco Sales Floor in Harare in this Wednesday, May, 17, 2017 photo. Many Zimbabwean tobacco farmers are making big sales this season, but they don't feel they're benefiting from the crop, the nation's second biggest earner after gold. A cash shortage that underlines this southern African country's deepening economic woes has left farmers who travel long distances to auctions unpaid, stranded and desperate. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)
May 30, 2017 - 6:59 am
HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — Farmer Simon Kahari recently sold tobacco worth more than $6,000 at an auction in Zimbabwe, a small fortune reflecting the golden leaf's resurgence in this southern African country. Yet because of Zimbabwe's dire economic problems he ended up sleeping in an auction house...
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FILE - In this Sunday, July 1, 2012, file photo, cows which are considered holy by Hindus stray around as a Hindu devotee, center, offers prayers to the Sun after bathing at Sangam in Allahabad, India. The Indian government has banned the sale of cows and buffaloes for slaughter in a move to protect animals considered holy by many Hindus. State governments and industry bodies have criticized the ban as a blow to beef and leather exports that will also leave hundreds of thousands jobless and deprive millions of Christians, Muslims and poor Hindus of a cheap source of protein. (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh, File)
May 29, 2017 - 5:13 am
NEW DELHI (AP) — A new ban imposed by India's government on the sale of cows and buffaloes for slaughter to protect animals considered holy by many Hindus is drawing widespread protests from state governments and animal-related industries. Many state governments criticized the ban as a blow to beef...
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May 29, 2017 - 2:52 am
NEW DELHI (AP) — The Indian government has banned the sale of cows and buffaloes for slaughter in a move to protect animals considered holy by many Hindus. State governments and industry bodies have criticized the ban as a blow to beef and leather exports that will also leave hundreds of thousands...
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May 26, 2017 - 1:52 pm
TIRANA, Albania (AP) — Food authorities in Albania say they are returning a poultry shipment to Brazil after tests found high levels of salmonella. The National Food Authority statement said Friday that the 26 metric tons (28.6 tons) of frozen poultry imported by a local Albanian company was...
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May 24, 2017 - 8:29 pm
FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — A renowned strawberry researcher in California broke patent law and violated a loyalty pledge to his former university by taking his work with him to profit from it in a private company, a jury in San Francisco decided Wednesday. Professor Douglas Shaw formed his own research...
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In this photo taken July 9, 2014, humpback whales feed at the Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary off Cape Cod near Provincetown, Mass. A new study explains how the baleen whale family, which includes humpback whales, grew seemingly suddenly only a few million years ago from smaller creatures to the ocean giants they are now. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
May 23, 2017 - 9:52 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists think they have answered a whale of a mystery: How the ocean creatures got so huge so quickly. A few million years ago, the largest whales, averaged maybe 15 feet long. That's big, but you could still hold a fossil skull in two hands. Then seemingly overnight, one type...
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May 23, 2017 - 7:01 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists think they have answered a whale of a mystery: How the ocean creatures got so huge so quickly. A few million years ago, the largest whales, averaged maybe 15 feet long. That's big, but you could still hold a fossil skull in two hands. Then seemingly overnight, one type...
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FILE -- In this Sunday, June 27, 2010 file photo two men compete in an ostrich race at Highgate ostrich farm in Oudtshoorn, South Africa. Clambering onto an ostrich for a ride used to be popular among tourists in a South African town of Oudtshoorn known of as the “ostrich capital of the world.” Not so much anymore. Two major ostrich farms in Oudtshoorn have stopped offering ostrich rides to tourists, responding to concerns about the birds’ welfare. A third farm is sticking with the feature, saying it is regulated and that ostriches do not experience discomfort.. The Highgate farm, however, continues to offer ostrich rides.(AP Photo/Shuji Kajiyama, File)
May 22, 2017 - 11:11 am
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Clambering onto an ostrich for a ride used to be popular among tourists in a South African town known as the "ostrich capital of the world." Not so much anymore. Two major ostrich farms in the Oudtshoorn area have stopped offering ostrich rides to tourists, responding to...
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