Addiction and substance abuse

June 27, 2017 - 12:49 am
NEW YORK (AP) — U2 bassist Adam Clayton thanked his bandmates for their support during his treatment and recovery from alcohol abuse years ago, before joining them for a rollicking rendition of a few hits. Clayton received an award Monday night at a Manhattan theater from MusiCares, a foundation...
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Stephanie Woodward, of Rochester, NY, who has spina bifida and uses a wheelchair, is removed from a sit-in at Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's office as she and other disability rights advocates protest proposed funding caps to Medicaid, Thursday, June 22, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
June 22, 2017 - 10:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on Senate Republicans' health care bill (all times local): 10 p.m. Medical organizations and other interest groups are weighing in on the Senate Republican health care bill, and they have problems with the proposal. The American Academy of Pediatrics says the bill would...
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Police Gen. Oscar Albayalde holds a copy of an image of a gunman who stormed the Resorts World Manila complex whom he identified as Jessie Carlos during a news conference Sunday, June 4, 2017 in suburban Pasay city, southeast of Manila, Philippines. The lone suspect behind a deadly attack on the casino and shopping complex in Manila was a heavily indebted Filipino who was hooked on gambling, police said Sunday, bolstering their claim the assault was not terror-related. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)
June 04, 2017 - 5:41 am
MANILA, Philippines (AP) — The lone suspect behind a deadly attack on a casino and shopping complex in Manila was a heavily indebted Filipino gambling addict, police said Sunday, bolstering their claim that the assault was not terrorism-related. The man's immediate family confirmed his identity as...
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June 01, 2017 - 1:44 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Ohio's lieutenant governor revealed Thursday that her two sons have struggled with opioid addiction, adding her family to the thousands known to be affected by the nation's prescription painkiller and heroin epidemic. "Like many Ohioans, my family is struggling with addiction...
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FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2010 file photo, a pharmacy tech poses for a picture with hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets, the generic version of Vicodin in Edmond, Okla. A report released Wednesday, May 31, 2017 traces how a short letter in a medical journal in 1980 helped sow the seeds of today's opioid epidemic by helping to convince doctors that these powerful painkillers carried less risk of addiction than they actually do. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)
May 31, 2017 - 5:37 pm
Nearly 40 years ago, a respected doctor wrote a letter to the New England Journal of Medicine with some very good news: Out of nearly 40,000 patients given powerful pain drugs in a Boston hospital, only four addictions were documented. Doctors had been wary of opioids, fearing patients would get...
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FILE- This undated file image released by Profiles in History shows the first chapter of a manuscript that would become the Alcoholics Anonymous "Big Book," which includes stories and strategies for controlling addiction. The manuscript is scheduled to be sold at auction on June 8, 2017, but Alcoholics Anonymous World Services Inc., has filed suit in New York seeking its return. (Broad Highway Publishing Co. via AP, File)
May 23, 2017 - 8:23 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Alcoholics Anonymous is demanding the return of its 1939 original manuscript describing the "Twelve Step" program of recovery from alcoholism. Alcoholics Anonymous World Services Inc. in New York state court last Thursday sued an Alabama man, Ken Roberts, who owns the manuscript, a...
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FILE - In this Thursday, May 4, 2017, file photo, Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, after the House pushed through a health care bill. On May 9, 2017, Price said, “If we just simply substitute buprenorphine or methadone or some other opioid-type medication for the opioid addiction, then we haven't moved the dial much.” But in an opinion piece published May 17 in the Charleston Gazette-Mail, he twice mentioned his agency’s support for medication-assisted treatment. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
May 22, 2017 - 1:26 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Remarks by a top U.S. health official have reignited a quarrel in the world of addiction and recovery: Does treating opioid addiction with medication save lives? Or does it trade one addiction for another? Health Secretary Tom Price's recent comments — one replying to a reporter's...
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May 13, 2017 - 2:11 am
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — In Appalachian states hit hardest by the opioid epidemic, the tough-on-crime policy announced Friday by U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions runs counter to a recent emphasis on treatment and less prison time for low-level drug offenders. Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul strongly...
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California Highway Patrol Sgt. Jaimi Kenyon, swabs the inside of her mouth to collect saliva during a demonstration of drug testing device Wednesday, May 10, 2017, in Sacramento, Calif. Three of California's largest counties are testing a device that can detect the presence of drugs in saliva within five minutes. Some officers and lawmakers want the devices used statewide after voters passed Proposition 64 in November, legalizing the recreational use of marijuana. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
May 10, 2017 - 8:20 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Police in three California counties are testing what amounts to a breathalyzer for drug users — a device that some authorities and lawmakers said Wednesday is desperately needed now that voters have legalized recreational marijuana in the state. When legalization takes...
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In this Jan. 19, 2017, handout photo from the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center, nurse Amanda Fritsch checks the catheter delivering a drug that kept Stuart Anders’ injured leg numb for three days. Called a nerve block, the non-addictive numbing treatment substantially cut the amount of opioid painkillers that Anders otherwise would have been prescribed for his shattered femur. (University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center via AP)
May 02, 2017 - 5:18 am
BALTIMORE (AP) — A car crash shattered Stuart Anders' thigh, leaving pieces of bone sticking through his skin. Yet Anders begged emergency room doctors not to give him powerful opioid painkillers — he'd been addicted once before and panicked at the thought of relapsing. "I can't lose what I worked...
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