President Donald Trump arrives to speak at an event called "Kids First: Getting America's Children Safely Back to School" in the State Dining room of the White House, Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The Latest: Trump says he's hopeful for fall football season

August 12, 2020 - 4:23 pm

WASHINGTON — At a White House event on reopening schools, President Donald Trump said he has spoken with Clemson quarterback Trevor Lawrence and Louisiana State University coach Ed Orgeron about moving forward with the football season.

Lawrence has helped spearhead the #WeWantToPlay movement, a coalition of players calling on colleges not to cancel the upcoming season because of coronavirus concerns and give student-athletes greater say as it considers safety issues.

Trump said Wednesday he’s hopeful that both college and high school football would be played in the fall. The Big Ten and Pac-12 this week announced plans to postpone the football season.

Trump said Orgeron “feels his players just want to be out there.”

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HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

— 1,200 Alabama students home after positive test

— Companies test antibody drugs to treat, prevent COVID-19

— Science and politics tied up in global race for a vaccine

— A top official at the Federal Reserve criticized the decision by many states to reopen businesses this spring before getting the virus fully under control, saying those choices have hindered an economic recovery in the U.S.

— More than half of participating Milan fashion houses are preparing to present in-person previews for Spring-Summer 2021. Fashion houses next month will have social distancing and mask requirements.

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Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at http://apnews.com/VirusOutbreak and https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

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HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING:

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Ohio Secretary of State Frank LaRose is seeking to reassure voters that nothing — including the coronavirus and skepticism about mail-in voting that’s been stoked by President Donald Trump — will stop the election and that it will be safe and secure.

The Republican issued on Wednesday a 48-point voting safety plan based on CDC guidelines to Ohio’s 88 county election boards that strongly recommends, but does not mandate, mask-wearing on Election Day.

He characterized the failure to wear a mask as rude and, like nose-picking, “just gross,” but said that his protocol makes accommodations to all voters. Those in-person voters who choose not to wear a face covering will be given options, including voting outside or using the curbside option, but they will not be stopped from voting inside if that’s their choice.

LaRose said requiring masks to be worn would step on people’s right to vote and place an unfair enforcement burden on poll workers.

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NEW ORLEANS — New Orleans’ health director says the city is seeing improvement in its COVID-19 infection rate but it’s too early to say how soon its public school students will be able to return to classrooms.

Dr. Jennifer Avegno told reporters Wednesday that the city’s infection rate has hit an important milestone of 50 or fewer new cases a day. But the positive trend will have to be sustained before it would be advisable for children to return to classes.

New Orleans schools began reopening last week — with online-only orientation and instruction. School officials have said they hope to begin more in-school classes at some point after Labor Day.

She added that other restrictions in the city — where bars have been shut down, restaurants are open at limited capacity and numerous other restrictions on gatherings are in place — would have to stay in place for several weeks after children are back.

Louisiana was an early COVID-19 hotspot and New Orleans was its epicenter in the spring. After successfully bringing numbers down, the state saw a major resurgence that led to the re-imposition of restrictions.

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ATLANTA — Georgia’s largest school district struggled Wednesday to launch online learning for its 180,000 students, with parents complaining students couldn’t log in to Gwinnett County’s system.

Meanwhile, Cherokee County has quarantined 1,156 students after trying in-school learning, adding about 330 students to yesterday’s total. They are home because of possible coronavirus exposure since classes resumed last week.

About 70 students and staff members in the 40,000-student Cherokee County district have tested positive for the coronavirus, according to data posted Wednesday on the district’s website. It’s unclear whether any were infected at school.

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JACKSON, Miss. — The American Civil Liberties Union of Mississippi and the Mississippi Center for Justice filed a lawsuit over concerns about the state’s absentee voting law.

They filed suit against Secretary of State Michael Watson, who is the state’s top elections officer, and against circuit clerks in Hinds and Rankin counties.

The lawsuit asks a judge to issue a statewide declaration to allow absentee voting by people with health conditions that could put them in extra danger because of the virus. Mississippi only allows absentee voting for a few reasons. Plaintiffs include people who have had cancer or have other conditions, including lupus and asthma. The groups say the law is confusing and could be applied inconsistently during the coronavirus pandemic.

Legislators made a change that allows absentee voting by people quarantined with COVID-19 or caring for someone with the virus. The lawsuit says election officials could interpret the law differently in different places.

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ATHENS, Greece — Health authorities in Greece have announced 262 new coronavirus infections, the highest daily number since the outbreak began.

Two more deaths were announced, bringing the total death toll to 216. The total number of confirmed cases is 6,177.

Greece imposed an early lockdown that kept the number of infections and deaths low. But there’s been significant increase in the number of confirmed cases since restrictions were lifted and the country reopened to international visitors.

Authorities have imposed new restrictions in some areas, including ordering bars, restaurants and cafes in some of the country’s top tourist spots to shut between midnight and 7 a.m.

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MOULTON, Ala. — More than 1,200 students at two Alabama schools will begin the year at home after a person connected with both schools tested positive for COVID-19.

While 12 other Lawrence County schools planned to begin traditional classes Wednesday, Superintendent Jon Bret Smith told the Decatur Daily that students from the elementary and middle schools in Moulton, located in north Alabama, would start the academic year taking classes online.

Education officials learned Monday that a person linked to both schools had tested positive for the disease caused by the coronavirus. State health officials recommended delaying the reopening by two weeks. Combined, the schools have more than 105 workers.

School officials notified 10 people who were in contact with the person. Computers are being distributed for online classes.

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ROME — Italy added another 481 coronavirus cases and authorities are weighing whether to impose tests or quarantines on Italian vacationers returning from coronavirus hotspots.

Some regional governors have announced plans or proposals to use rapid tests at airports or quarantines after Italians returning from vacation in Malta, Croatia, Spain and Greece tested positive once home. Other clusters have been traced to newly arrived migrants and migrant centers.

Italian news reports said the regional affairs minister, Francesco Boccia, was meeting with regional governors Wednesday.

France and Germany have announced tests-on-arrival after their daily cases topped 1,000. In Italy, where the virus first erupted in Europe in February, new cases are hovering around 300-500 per day.

Italy has 251,713 confirmed infections. With 10 more deaths, the total confirmed death toll stands at 35,225.

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BRASILIA, Brasil — The grandmother of Brazil’s first lady died Wednesday after more than a month fighting COVID-19 in a public hospital on the outskirts of Brasilia.

Maria Aparecida Firmo Ferreira, 80, was the grandmother of Michelle Bolsonaro, who is married to Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro. She had been hospitalized since July 1, having tested positive for the coronavirus.

The health secretariat of Brazil’s federal district confirmed her death.

President Bolsonaro and Michelle Bolsonaro were diagnosed with COVID-19 last month. The president, who has recovered, has consistently downplayed the severity of the virus.

Brazil has more than 3.1 million confirmed cases of coronavirus and more than 103,000 deaths, ranking second highest in the world.

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BERLIN — Switzerland plans to permit public gatherings of more than 1,000 people at sports events and concerts starting Oct. 1.

Organizers will have to apply for permission and meet social distancing requirements.

Switzerland was one of the first countries in Europe to ban large scale events on Feb. 28 to combat the coronavirus.

The Swiss government says any decision on whether to allow individual events will be up to Switzerland’s 26 cantons (states) and depend on the local virus situation.

In a statement following its weekly Cabinet meeting, the Swiss government says, “this careful reopening step takes into account the needs of society and the economic interests of sports clubs and cultural venues.”

Government officials also decided to make wearing of masks compulsory on all scheduled and charter flights taking off from or landing in Switzerland, starting Saturday.

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COPENHAGEN, Denmark — Norwegian Prime Minister Erna Solberg advised against traveling abroad, adding countries to its list of European nations where non-essential travels is not recommended.

Norway’s red list of countries included the Netherlands, Poland, Cyprus, Iceland, Malta, and parts of Sweden and Denmark including the Faeroe Islands.

Norway had earlier listed as red: France, Spain, Portugal, Belgium, Switzerland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Romania and Bulgaria.

People from those countries must quarantine for 10 days.

Last week, the Norwegian Institute of Public Health said nearly half the cases in Norway come from abroad.

Norway has 9,750 confirmed cases and 256 deaths.

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MADRID — Spain’s army is setting up a field hospital in Zaragoza as the northern city struggles to stop a new spike in coronavirus cases.

The region of Aragón, home to Zaragoza, has led Spain over the past seven days with 242 hospitalizations and 32 deaths from COVID-19.

The army says it responded to a request by Aragón’s government to set up the field hospital in the parking lot of one of its hospitals in Zaragoza. The army says it should be ready for use if needed by Friday.

Regional health authorities say the field hospital is a precaution in case the hospitals reach capacity as they did in many parts of Spain during the months of March and April when the pandemic first hit.

During that first wave of the virus, the army put up several field hospitals in Spanish cities.

Spain had managed to reign in the virus until a steady uptick in cases in the northeast and central areas in recent weeks.

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ATHENS, Greece — Greece’s health minister is warning young people about the ease of transmission of the coronavirus.

New daily cases have been in the triple digits for several days. Vassilis Kikilias tweeted the average age of those sickened by the virus in Greece in August had fallen to 36.

The government has imposed new restrictions on some areas, ordering bars and restaurants to shut between midnight and 7 a.m. in some of the country’s top tourist destinations.

Greece initially was credited with handling the coronavirus outbreak well, imposing an early lockdown that kept infections and deaths at low levels. But it has seen a resurgence of the virus after lifting restrictions and opening to visitors as it tries to bolster tourism.

On Wednesday, Greece reported 196 new coronavirus cases and one new death, bringing the total number of confirmed infections to 5,942 and the death toll to 214.

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ANNAPOLIS, Md. — A municipal government in China has donated 40,000 medical-grade face masks to Maryland’s capital city amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The donations from Changsha, China, were first offered to Annapolis city officials in April, when the need for the masks among public safety workers was high in the beginning of the pandemic, Annapolis City Manager David Jarrell said Tuesday.

Annapolis’ relationship with Changsha began under a former city administrator. The two municipalities are now sister cities.

The masks arrived this month, with one of the boxes featuring American and Chinese flags with a message that read: “Go, City of Annapolis! Best Wishes from Changsha! True unity inspires people to work as one to overcome adversity,” The Capital Gazette reported.

Another note from Yani Xia, a representative in the Chinese city’s Foreign Affairs Office, accompanied the shipments. “We sincerely wish you and everyone in Annapolis continued good health, and the fortitude to persevere during this challenging period,” Xia’s note read.

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VATICAN CITY — Pope Francis has denounced a culture of individuality revealed by the pandemic, which has sacrificed the care of the weakest members of society.

Francis, speaking at his Wednesday audience called on the faithful to “overcome our personal and collective individualism” as experts work to find a cure for the coronavirus, “which hit us all indiscriminately.”

The pontiff says ‘’the pandemic has revealed how vulnerable and interconnected we all are,” while also making us “more aware of the spread within our societies of a false, individualistic way of thinking, one that rejects human dignity and relationships, views persons as consumer goods and creates a ‘throw-away’ culture.”

He called on people to “look with care at our brothers and sisters, especially those who suffer,’’ and recognize “human dignity in every person, whatever their race, language or condition.”

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TAIPEI, Taiwan — U.S. Health Secretary Alex Azar says the push to develop a COVID-19 vaccine is “not a race to be first.”

Azar’s comments during a visit to Taiwan on Wednesday follow Russian President Vladimir Putin’s announcement that his country was the first to approve a coronavirus vaccine, prompting doubts about the science and safety behind that purported achievement.

Azar says the U.S. is combining the powers of its government, economy and biopharmaceutical industry to “deliver as quickly as we can for the benefit of the United States’ citizens, but also for the people of the world, safe and effective vaccines.”

He says the U.S. has secured an advanced manufacturing contract for a vaccine being developed by the company Moderna and has supply agreements with five other firms who have vaccines in the works.

He says four of the six companies under contract have reported testing results showing they produce more antibodies for the virus than people who have survived COVID-19, without severe side effects.

Azar says two companies’ vaccine candidates have entered the third phase of trials while the Russian vaccine is just now embarking on that stage with no information having been disclosed.

He says the U.S. process should allow the production of a “gold-standard, safe and effective vaccine” available in the tens of millions of doses by the end of the year.

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