FILE - In this Dec. 19, 2016, file photo, Iowa Secretary of State Paul Pate collects ballots during Iowa's Electoral College vote at the Statehouse in Des Moines, Iowa. Nearly 1 percent of voters in Iowa's largest counties did not show identifications during the June 5 primary, an early sign that the new voter ID law could have some impact when it takes full effect next year. As part of a gradual rollout of the ID requirements, voters without them in 2018 are being allowed to sign an "Oath of Identification" attesting that they are who they say they are. Pate has argued that the identification requirements will improve the integrity of elections. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall, File)

At least 1,198 Iowa primary voters didn't show IDs

June 28, 2018 - 2:37 pm

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Nearly 1 percent of the electorate in Iowa's largest counties did not show identifications during the June 5 primary, prompting critics to warn that the requirement could disenfranchise some voters in elections beginning next year.

Figures provided by the 10 counties with the highest turnout show that 1,198 voters signed oaths attesting to their identities of 144,000 ballots cast.

Those voters either didn't have one of the IDs required or chose not to show one in protest. It won't affect the November election, when there are competitive statewide and congressional races, because the oath will still be allowed.

A spokesman for Iowa Secretary of State Paul Pate says the numbers aren't an indicator of future problems and the oath educates voters so they are familiar with requirements next year.

.

Comments ()