The Latest: Governor OKs school safety hotline, grants bill

June 22, 2018 - 9:24 pm

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — The Latest on xxxxxxx (all times local):

9 p.m.

A brand new school safety law in Pennsylvania is designed to set up state-administered programs to distribute grants and take anonymous reports of dangerous activities or threats of violence in schools.

Gov. Tom Wolf signed the bill in the hours after the House and Senate overwhelmingly approved it Friday as part of a budget package that's seeding the grant program with $60 million.

The bill was spurred by February's Parkland, Florida school shooting that killed 17 people.

School districts can apply for a grant for a wide range of purposes, including safety and security assessments, security-related technology, training, counselors, police officers and anti-violence programs.

The anonymous reports program would be called "Safe 2 Say" and relay reports to police. It's modeled on one Colorado created after 1999's Columbine school shooting.

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6:30 p.m.

Gov. Tom Wolf plans to sign school safety legislation that's designed to set up state-administered programs to distribute grants and take anonymous reports of dangerous activities or threats of violence in schools.

The House and Senate overwhelmingly approved the bill Friday as part of an advancing budget package that's seeding the grant program with $60 million.

Lawmakers' exploration of improvements to school safety was spurred by February's Parkland, Florida school shooting that killed 17 people.

Under the bill, school districts could apply for a grant for a wide range of purposes, including safety and security assessments, security-related technology, training, counselors, police officers and anti-violence programs.

The anonymous reports program would be called "Safe 2 Say" and relay reports to police. It's modeled on one Colorado created after 1999's Columbine school shooting.

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3 p.m.

School safety legislation is advancing in Pennsylvania's Legislature to set up state-administered programs to distribute grants and take anonymous reports of dangerous activities or threats of violence in schools.

The House unanimously approved the bill Friday, and sent it to the Senate as part of an advancing budget package that's seeding the grant program with $60 million.

Lawmakers are exploring improvements to school safety spurred by February's Parkland, Florida school shooting that killed 17 people.

Under the bill, school districts could apply for a grant for a wide range of purposes, including safety and security assessments, security-related technology, training, counselors, police officers and anti-violence programs.

The anonymous reports program would be called "Safe 2 Say" and relay reports to police. It's modeled on one Colorado created after 1999's Columbine school shooting.

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