National

In this May 5, 2014 photo, the casket of Endia Martin is carried by pallbearers following funeral services for 14-year-old at St. Andrew Temple Baptist Church in Chicago. Martin was killed by another 14-year-old in what started as a Facebook feud over a boy. Sentencing is scheduled on Wednesday, June 20, 2018, in juvenile court for the teen who pleaded guilty in the death of Martin in January. Under the law she faces a mandatory sentence of five years in custody, or until the age of 21. The teen, who is now 18, can be paroled when she turns 19 next month. (Jessica Koscielniak/Chicago Sun-Times via AP)
June 20, 2018 - 12:50 am
CHICAGO (AP) — A Chicago teenager will be sentenced Wednesday for using a gun given to her by an uncle to kill another girl in what started as a Facebook feud over a boy, ending a chapter in a case that came to symbolize how the gun violence that plagues parts of the city passes from one generation...
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FILE - In this July 18, 2016 file photo, actor Scott Baio speaks during the opening day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. Prosecutors have declined to file charges against Baio stemming from allegations by his former “Charles in Charge” co-star that he sexually assaulted her. The Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office decided Monday, June 18, 2018, not to file charges, saying in an evaluation that the statute of limitations had expired. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
June 19, 2018 - 11:57 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Prosecutors have declined to file charges against Scott Baio stemming from allegations by his former "Charles in Charge" co-star that he sexually assaulted her. The Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office decided Monday not to file charges, saying in an evaluation that the...
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FILE - In this June 1, 2018, file photo, members of the the Culinary Union carry signs at a union hall in Las Vegas. Thousands of unionized workers at Las Vegas casino-resorts operated by MGM Resorts International are set to approve their newly negotiated five-year contract. The agreement up for a vote Tuesday, June 19, 2018, includes wage increases and stronger protections against sexual harassment for 24,000 bartenders, housekeepers and other members of the Culinary Union.(AP Photo/John Locher, File)
June 19, 2018 - 11:55 pm
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Thousands of unionized workers at Las Vegas casino-resorts operated by MGM Resorts International, including Bellagio, Aria and Mandalay Bay, approved a new five-year contract Tuesday. The contract includes wage increases, new paid bereavement leave and stronger protections against...
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This 2018 photo provided by Beata Mariana de Jesus Mejia-Mejia shows herself with her son Darwin Micheal Mejia in Quetzaltenango, Guatemala, before they left for the United States and crossed the border near San Luis, Arizona. On Tuesday, June 19, Mejia-Mejia, who hasn't seen her 7-year-old son since he was taken from her a month ago, sued the Trump administration. She was released from custody while her asylum case is pending and thinks her son, Darwin, might be in a shelter in Arizona. (Beata Mariana de Jesus Mejia-Mejia via AP)
June 19, 2018 - 9:45 pm
Trump administration officials have been sending babies and other young children forcibly separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border to at least three "tender age" shelters in South Texas, The Associated Press has learned. Lawyers and medical providers who have visited the Rio Grande...
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FILE- In this Tuesday, May 2, 2017, file photo, Verizon corporate signage is captured on a store in Manhattan's Midtown area, in New York. Verizon is pledging to stop selling data to outsiders through middlemen that can pinpoint the location of mobile phones, the Associated Press has learned. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)
June 19, 2018 - 9:03 pm
Verizon, AT&T, Sprint and T-Mobile have pledged to stop providing information on U.S. phone owners' locations to data brokers, stepping back from a business practice that has drawn criticism for endangering privacy. The data has apparently allowed outside companies to pinpoint the location of...
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In this image tweeted by David Caltabiano of KABB/WOAI, a heavily damaged SUV is seen on Texas Highway 85 in Big Wells, Texas, after crashing while carrying more than a dozen people fleeing from Border Patrol agents, Sunday, June 17, 2018. (David Caltabiano/KABB/WOAI via AP)
June 19, 2018 - 9:02 pm
DALLAS (AP) — Federal prosecutors charged five people Tuesday in a scheme to smuggle immigrants illegally after an SUV driven by one of them crashed in Texas while fleeing Border Patrol agents, killing five passengers. The crash happened Sunday after Border Patrol became suspicious of three...
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U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, center and congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz, right, were denied entry by security into the Homestead Temporary Shelter for Unaccompanied Children on Tuesday, June 19, 2018, in Homestead, Fla. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)
June 19, 2018 - 8:59 pm
HOMESTEAD, Fla. (AP) — U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson accused the Trump administration of a "cover-up" after officials denied him entry Tuesday to a detention center for migrant children in South Florida where he had hoped to survey living conditions. Nelson and U.S. Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, both...
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Pearl Harbor survivor Ray Emory, center, salutes sailors who stood in an honor cordon, Tuesday, June 19, 2018, in Honolulu. Emory, who served aboard the USS Honolulu during the 1941 attack, is moving back the the mainland and wanted to visit the site where his former ship was moored one last time. (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)
June 19, 2018 - 8:08 pm
PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii (AP) — Nearly eight decades ago, Ray Emory, then a young sailor, watched in disbelief as Japanese torpedoes tore into American ships in Pearl Harbor. Emory survived the devastating attack but didn't forget his fellow sailors and Marines who died and were buried there without...
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June 19, 2018 - 8:08 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — An Idaho couple has sued the U.S. government, saying their teenage son still suffers headaches after a predator-killing trap that federal workers mistakenly placed near their home doused him with cyanide. Mark and Theresa Mansfield of Pocatello filed the lawsuit Monday in U.S...
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Assemblywoman Shirley Weber, D-San Diego, is congratulated by Pastor Les Simmons after her bill to limit police use of deadly force was approved by the Senate Public Safety Committee, Tuesday, June 19, 2018, in Sacramento, Calif. California senators are advancing a first-in-the-nation bill to significantly change the standards for when police can open fire, acting after an emotion-charged debate over killings that have recently roiled the country. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
June 19, 2018 - 8:06 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California would lead the U.S. in significantly changing the standard for when police can fire their weapons under legislation that cleared its first hurdle Tuesday after an emotionally charged debate over deadly shootings that have roiled the country. It's time to change...
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