Food and drink

This Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018 photo shows part of an ingredient label, which lists "artificial flavoring," on a packet of candy in New York. In November 2018, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has decided to give companies two years to purge their products of the six ingredients, described only as “artificial flavors” on packages. The words “artificial flavor” or “natural flavor” refer to any of thousands of ingredients. (AP Photo/Patrick Sison)
November 13, 2018 - 11:28 am
NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. regulators are giving food companies two years to remove six artificial flavors from their products, even though they say the ingredients are safe in the trace amounts used. The move highlights tension between consumer advocates, who want to know more about what exactly is in...
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FILE - In this Sept. 2, 2016, file photo, a friend's basket of clams sit in the water as Mike Suprin, of Rollinsford, N.H., calls it a day after filling his basket with softshell clams at Cape Porpoise in Kennebunkport, Maine. A study by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientists released in 2018 concluded that valuable species of shellfish, including softshell clams, have become harder to find on the East Coast because of degraded habitats caused by a warming environment. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
November 11, 2018 - 2:44 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Valuable species of shellfish have become harder to find on the East Coast because of degraded habitat caused by a warming environment, according to a pair of scientists that sought to find out whether environmental factors or overfishing was the source of the decline. The...
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October 30, 2018 - 2:59 pm
CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — A judge has ruled that two Wyoming laws barring people from trespassing to collect environmental data run afoul of the U.S. Constitution. U.S. District Judge Scott Skavdahl in Casper ruled Monday that the laws violate free-speech rights. The laws are an example of so-called "...
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FILE- This Jan. 22, 2018, file photo shows the Dunkin' Donuts logo on a shop in Mount Lebanon, Pa. First, Dunkin’ dropped the “Donuts” from its name. Now, it’s adding espresso drinks to its menu. Dunkin’ says most of its 9,200 U.S. stores will offer lattes, cappuccinos and other espresso-based hot and cold drinks by the holiday season. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)
October 24, 2018 - 2:32 pm
First, Dunkin' dropped the "Donuts" from its name. Now it's adding espresso drinks to its menu. Dunkin' says U.S. customers will be able to buy lattes, cappuccinos and other espresso-based hot and cold drinks at most of its 9,200 U.S. stores by the holiday season. It's part of an effort by Canton,...
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October 18, 2018 - 4:33 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Authorities say StarKist has agreed to plead guilty to price fixing as part of a broad collusion investigation of the canned tuna industry. Federal prosecutors announced the plea agreement Thursday and said the company faces a fine up to $100 million. Bumble Bee Foods last year...
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FILE - In this July 1, 2010 file photo, chickens poke their heads out of cages in Turner, Maine. President Donald Trump’s tariffs on steel, aluminum and other imported goods are threatening a trade deal with South Africa that gives U.S. chicken producers duty-free access to a market that had effectively been shut to them for years. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
October 16, 2018 - 10:38 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Which came first, the chicken or the trade war? Well before President Donald Trump began slapping tariffs on steel, aluminum and other imported goods, there was a deal with South Africa that gave U.S. chicken producers duty-free access to a market that had effectively been shut to...
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FILE - In this Sept. 10, 2008, file photo, chickens huddle in their cages at an egg processing plant at the Dwight Bell Farm in Atwater, Calif. Proposition 12 on California's November ballot would require that egg-laying hens be cage free by 2022. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
October 06, 2018 - 12:14 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — California voters are right to think they already weighed in on how big cages should be for egg-laying hens. In 2008, voters ushered in Proposition 2, which sought to free egg-laying hens from tiny cages. It didn't outlaw cages but barred California farmers from keeping hens —...
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This 2013 photo provided by the Boyce Thompson Institute shows corn leaf aphids used in a study to modify crop plants through engineered viruses. In an opinion paper published Thursday, Oct. 4, 2018, in the journal Science, the authors say the U.S. needs to provide greater justification for the peace-time purpose of its Insect Allies project to avoid being perceived as hostile to other countries. Other experts expressed ethical and security concerns with the research, which seeks to transmit protective traits to crops already growing in the field. (Meena Haribal/Boyce Thompson Institute via AP)
October 04, 2018 - 4:14 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — A research arm of the U.S. military is exploring the possibility of deploying insects to make plants more resilient by altering their genes. Some experts say the work may be seen as a potential biological weapon. In an opinion paper published Thursday in the journal Science, the...
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FILE - This July 11, 2018, file photo shows yogurt on display at a grocery store in River Ridge, La. The Food and Drug Administration established a standard for yogurt in 1981 that limited the ingredients. The industry swiftly objected, and the following year the agency suspended enforcement on various provisions, and allowed the addition of preservatives. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)
September 25, 2018 - 9:59 am
NEW YORK (AP) — If low-fat yogurt is blended with fatty ingredients like coconut or chocolate, is it still low-fat? Is it even yogurt? The U.S. government has rules about what can be called "yogurt," and the dairy industry says it's not clear what the answers are. Now it's hopeful it will finally...
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Jack Maloney poses in front of the grain bins on his Little Ireland Farms in Brownsburg, Ind., Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018. Maloney, who farms about 2,000 acres in Hendricks Count, said the aid for farmers is "a nice gesture" but what farmers really want is free trade, not government handouts. American farmers will soon begin getting checks from the government as part of a billion-dollar bailout to help those experiencing financial strain from President Donald Trump’s trade disputes with China(AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
September 23, 2018 - 8:28 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Farmers across the United States will soon begin receiving checks from the federal government as part of a billion-dollar bailout to help those experiencing financial strain from President Donald Trump's trade disputes with China. But even farmers poised for big payouts worry it...
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